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It depends. If it's being described from the POV of a human, then it should be ok, the person is merely describing the look in terms they are familiar with, which in turn, the reader redefines to terms they are familiar with. If it's not a necessary detail in the story, though, do you need to include it? Is there a plot reason for a pony tail, or could you ...


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I know in Jurassic Park by Michael Creighton, he described code in a way that emphasized what it DID instead of getting into the intricacies of it. He'd be like "Bob sent a command to locate the virus--the command failed." I don't know if this helps you, but the code was described in such a way that it didn't get in the way of the story. Maybe check it out?


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Before trying to expend it into more than a quadrilogy, publish the first one. Make sure the book is a success and the world appreciated before spending more time on it. Even great authors sometimes create universes that do not resonate with the reader. Sometimes it is a game of try-and-miss. Better fail with one book and spend time developing another ...


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Tell more stories. If you've built a world, put sentient beings in it and put conflicts in front of them. Let the world unfold in front of your characters, and let the characters talk about the other parts of the world, and the history of it, which haven't been discussed before. Write stories set long before or shortly after your existing series. Link it ...


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Describe the effects, particularly where the effects in space without the presence of air resistance/friction differ from the familiar effects in an atmosphere where friction slows things down. Thucydides' answer to your question in Worldbuilding SE gave several possibilities, e.g. "Kinetic energy weapons will go until they run into something." Since your ...


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Sci fi and fantasy get shelved together in the bookstore because they are such interchangeable sub-genres of the one umbrella genre: speculative fiction. What would life be like if X happened or existed? You get one cool thing that doesn't exist for free; the rest you have to earn by telling a good story. Around 2003, I discovered D&D. D&D isn't so ...


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In your mind the barrier is. Hmm? Bad Yoda jokes aside, aside from hard core rigid genre-ists (think Tolkein fan fiction) everything is a continuum. You could call Peter Pan a space opera in a way. It's an epic with space travel, but generally it's more of a fantasy. Similarly the Cameron movie Avatar is a clash of a science fiction Earth culture and a ...


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In simplest terms, the narrative of a space opera must occur primarily in space, and it must contain some concept of events that affect a multitude of planets. Fantasy (again, in simplest terms) just means containing elements of the fantastic (what most people would consider magic or the supernatural). The line between the two is blurry (as most things ...


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There are no watertight definitions when it comes to fantasy, the Gothic, and science fiction. In my personal opinion (which, though educated, is still only a possible reading), the best way to approach this is through Tzvetan Todorov's definition of the fantastic. In a nutshell: - if the world remains as you know it and everything is explainable within the ...



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