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Plato's Dialogues are the paradigmatic example of philosophical arguments in the form of fictionalized conversations, but no one reads them for the plot. More recently, Jostein Gaarder's Sophie's World is a famous attempt to dramatize a general introduction to philosophy in the form of a novel (although opinions are mixed as to how well it succeeds in either ...


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Interesting concept to make a story in dialog only (hopefully with some description and motion by the characters). I'm assuming the tension will come from the different perspectives of the speakers. One thing which you may want to do is have the speakers include stories in what they say and have those stories demonstrate their philosophical stance. In other ...


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While through your description i assume your story is a serious one, i think your best point of reference would come from comedy. It is a common trope in comedy, specially british comedy, to have characters who don't like anyone else, or that aren't particularly interested in anyone else. Like for example Jim, from Yahtzee Croshaw comedy novel "Mogworld". "...


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Consider writing the local character's story as a separate scene (and perhaps a separate chapter), with clear transitions between the two timeframes: "So, how did you end up here?" Hero said. "Make yourself comfortable, youngster," Local Character said. "This is going to take a while." # <scene break> It was 1953, and my mother had just ...


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and welcome to the site. I do not know of any novels that follow the format you are describing, but that is a good thing. I believe one of the reasons World War Z stood out from the mass of zombie fiction out there is because it had a different format: letters. That format made it stand out from the crowd, and I think a novel made primarily out of Q&A ...


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Sounds like you want to write a philosophical novel. Two examples that I can think of are Walker Percey's Lost in the Cosmos and Robert Persig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Both of the above are interesting reads, but interesting as philosophical texts, and as approaches to doing philosophy. You would probably not read them for the story alone....


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I note that Rolazaro Azeveires wrote: Looking at it the opposite way, I'd say that anything that your grandfather saw is "not-that-old". If you met (or may have met) the person that witnessed it, it does not feel that much different than being told of something that happened yesterday. E.g. I knew a person that was just around the corner when a ...


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There are basically 5 stages that worlds go through as they develop (read more here: http://www.bang2write.com/2013/05/top-5-tips-for-writing-science-fiction-by-robert-grant.html) and some the best sci-fi takes place in the period of transition from one stage to the next. By choosing to set your story between two world stages you get to watch both society ...


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Its actually a very subjective and artistic question. I would take tech, emotional attachment and the audience into account. Tech. What tech is there and how forward thinking is your futurist mind? How revolutionary is the tech and how long would you estimate science to get there? Emotional attachment What historical events are woven or known about in your ...


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Looking at it the opposite way, I'd say that anything that your grandfather saw is "not-that-old". If you met (or may have met) the person that witnessed it, it does not feel that much different than being told of something that happened yesterday. E.g. I knew a person that was just around the corner when a Portuguese president was shot back in 1918, so I ...


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Assuming that your characters relationship with the past is similar to your own, look back through historically significant events until you find one that feels old enough but not too old. Also consider which aspects of our society make up the history you are looking at, because different types of memories age at different rates. For example, the days ...


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I don't know. My Sci-fi is about 10 years in the future, but you said you wanted the present to be history. Maybe about 50-100. That should work. Hope this helped!


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I'm thinking around 2300 or 2500, although my reasoning is that I consider the American Revolution to be history, and everything before that to be ancient history. Although, that's just me. Try judging time on technological revolutions, i.e. American, French, industrial, modern technological revolution. All advanced the game quite a bit. Or you could just ...



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