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23

Please, don't. I have often encountered this in Fantasy and Science Fiction, and it breaks my make-believe. I am immediately thrown out of my beautiful escapist reverie and back on my sofa. I hate when authors do that. I expect a fiction to be consistent, and the narrator has to be part of the fiction if this is to work. The only setup where a quote like ...


7

Treat fantastic, made-up facts the same as you would treat facts about our own world. Do you describe the physiology of human beings when you write a book about people like you and me? No. Neither should you go into medical detail when you write about aliens – unless your protagonist is a scientist studying them. In that case, give us the same amount of ...


7

Here are some specific ideas to help you get started. First of all and most importantly: You must understand the core challenge you are facing. You are facing the overwhelming challenge at the start of writing a story that many writers face and run from. You have all of this information compiled and in some ways you feel as if it is too much. It ...


7

For your "Houston" example, definitely not if Apollo 13 is not culturally relevant to the person saying it. You can use some sayings from this universe in your universe, for example Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Because this could come about without someone having seen The Godfather Part II. It's just advice. But any quote or ...


6

A different slant on things, but Ayn Rand's Anthem has a non-supernatural hive mind (collectivism gone mad, I guess) and she shows it by using collective pronouns even for individuals. So instead of "I" she uses "we", even when there's only one character involved. I hate the book, but the pronouns were interesting. You might also want to check out Ancillary ...


6

The very first story I ever wrote was written from the perspective of a collective mind. So, as they say on /b/, this question is very relevant to my interests. I would approach the concept of an intergalactic hive mind from the perspective of sociology, neuropsychology, and biology. A hive of bees can be considered as a single organism: only the queen can ...


5

Here's a thought: would the infected members of the population even be aware that there is a hive mind of which they are a part? Sure, they experience extreme empathy and are subconsciously driven to act in ways that benefit the whole, but perhaps there is an individual experience that is largely oblivious to the organizing structure in which it is ...


5

David Brin's Uplift series has the traeki/Jophur, which are physically connected hive minds of stacked rings. Each ring is nominally a separate entity; the distinction between traeki and Jophur is the presence of a so-called 'master ring', basically an overriding personality which controls the other parts of the hive mind. As the species is only one of the ...


5

I've actually seen this used deliberately, to help establish the character of the... err... character in question. In the first chapter of The Tales of Paul Twister, we're introduced to Paul, a thief-for-hire in a magical world who's got a bit of a sour, snarky attitude about the world around him in general and his line of work in particular. He's been ...


5

If the quote is in reference to something that would not exist at all in the world you've created, it is completely inappropriate. Even if it happens to be a quote that would make contextual sense (no references to anything in our world), I would still avoid it. References to things that happen in our world, in a world that is not ours, only serve to ...


4

This is certainly valid in some contexts, e.g., in a parody, or while leaning on the fourth wall, for example ... "And using this device you can communicate if there are any issues." explained Houston. "Oh, great, but what if I have to fix it first, «Houston, we've had a problem?»" However, I would advise you against using it if you are not ...


4

Whatever point you choose on that spectrum you will have some readers who won't like the place that you have chosen. You will never get the balance exactly right for everyone. I am sure some people would enjoy a purely anthropological study of another species, if it was well written and contained interesting insights - myself included. Equally, that would ...


4

(This might get good answers on WorldBuilding SE also.) I think you have to decide, from a storytelling viewpoint, how these people communicate. Does each individual have his/her own thoughts but others pop in and out like everyone is always in the same room and thinking out loud? Do you only hear the thoughts of people within X geographical distance? Or is ...


4

There are no watertight definitions when it comes to fantasy, the Gothic, and science fiction. In my personal opinion (which, though educated, is still only a possible reading), the best way to approach this is through Tzvetan Todorov's definition of the fantastic. In a nutshell: - if the world remains as you know it and everything is explainable within the ...


4

I will answer your first question, as it seems to me like you are asking two questions. How long should a sci-fi Young Adult Novel be? First of all, the number of pages in a book does not matter. Adjusting the margins, font size, or spacing even slightly could alter the page count. What matters is the word count. A novel is classified as any book with ...


3

I once heard an entertaining lecture by the British pulp-SF author Lionel Fanthorpe about how he managed to produce at his peak an average of a 158 page book every 12 days. If Badger Books wanted a rush job, he could do a novel over a long weekend. Taking time off to watch the cricket if there was a Test Match on, obviously.


3

Check out Dean Wesley Smith's blog posts on "Pulp Speed" writing, and the number of words possible for some people. A million words a year? Wow. Heck, Michael Moorcock can write a 60K word novel in three days. The use of Lester Dent's Master Plot is blown out from 1500 words per section to 15K words per section, IIRC, and planning is key. NaNoWriMo says to ...


3

Yes. Here are some NaNoWriMo success stories: http://www.tor.com/2014/11/06/nanowrimo-success-stories-published-novels/ Edit, Additional: I personally know someone who's finished the NaNo sprint, and it's tough, but definitely possible. At the very least, NaNoWriMo may not be the novel you want, but it can serve as a first draft that you can later ...


3

It seems you have a lot of information that you've gathered, you have a strong idea of how your world works and the people it contains. Maybe it is time to start compiling some stories around the data that you've got. It doesn't need to be your primary novel, just some short stories to help you get the feel for who your characters are and how they react to ...


3

Describe the effects, particularly where the effects in space without the presence of air resistance/friction differ from the familiar effects in an atmosphere where friction slows things down. Thucydides' answer to your question in Worldbuilding SE gave several possibilities, e.g. "Kinetic energy weapons will go until they run into something." Since your ...


3

Tell more stories. If you've built a world, put sentient beings in it and put conflicts in front of them. Let the world unfold in front of your characters, and let the characters talk about the other parts of the world, and the history of it, which haven't been discussed before. Write stories set long before or shortly after your existing series. Link it ...


3

It depends. If it's being described from the POV of a human, then it should be ok, the person is merely describing the look in terms they are familiar with, which in turn, the reader redefines to terms they are familiar with. If it's not a necessary detail in the story, though, do you need to include it? Is there a plot reason for a pony tail, or could you ...


3

I agree with Lauren Ipsum, byt read from a variety of authors, not just one. In addition, read The Art of war. I know I just gave you more homework, but if you know what each side's strategies are, you could establish that for the reader, then twist things up. I'd also recommend reading the Illiad (or at least the battle scenes). Homer does what you ...


2

Character is in trouble situation on a planet and danger is closing in. He is in a good mood and he is speaking over a com with his mates, quoting: "Houston, we got a problem." But in this universe for example Earth does not exist. I'm going to edge away from the opinion part and try to focus on the when and why it may be appropriate. As with so many ...


2

Also check out And Then We Came to the End, by Joshua Ferris. It's second-person, and it works. Where you seek an effective hive-mind, Ferris sought an effective Office — the collective murmurings of a bunch of coworkers. The use of second-person enables an omniscient narration — all of the events are well-known gossip, water-cooler talk — while still ...


2

Before trying to expend it into more than a quadrilogy, publish the first one. Make sure the book is a success and the world appreciated before spending more time on it. Even great authors sometimes create universes that do not resonate with the reader. Sometimes it is a game of try-and-miss. Better fail with one book and spend time developing another ...


1

In your mind the barrier is. Hmm? Bad Yoda jokes aside, aside from hard core rigid genre-ists (think Tolkein fan fiction) everything is a continuum. You could call Peter Pan a space opera in a way. It's an epic with space travel, but generally it's more of a fantasy. Similarly the Cameron movie Avatar is a clash of a science fiction Earth culture and a ...


1

In simplest terms, the narrative of a space opera must occur primarily in space, and it must contain some concept of events that affect a multitude of planets. Fantasy (again, in simplest terms) just means containing elements of the fantastic (what most people would consider magic or the supernatural). The line between the two is blurry (as most things ...


1

Here is what I hope is a sufficient short answer: Science Fiction and Fantasy both change or add some aspect to our world. The general difference is that, in Science Fiction, the new aspect (like interstellar space travel or aliens) could exist, following the laws of the world we live in. It also usually has a technological theme/tone. Fantasy usually ...


1

Is the raccoon's brother also a raccoon? Like, are these just anthropomorphic animals? Because there's a pretty long tradition of that in children's books, so if you're writing a children's book, I don't think it's a problem at all. If you're writing an adult book? I have trouble seeing how the anthropomorphism would feel real, but I certainly don't think ...



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