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Consider writing the local character's story as a separate scene (and perhaps a separate chapter), with clear transitions between the two timeframes: "So, how did you end up here?" Hero said. "Make yourself comfortable, youngster," Local Character said. "This is going to take a while." # <scene break> It was 1953, and my mother had just ...


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While through your description i assume your story is a serious one, i think your best point of reference would come from comedy. It is a common trope in comedy, specially british comedy, to have characters who don't like anyone else, or that aren't particularly interested in anyone else. Like for example Jim, from Yahtzee Croshaw comedy novel "Mogworld". "...


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and welcome to the site. I do not know of any novels that follow the format you are describing, but that is a good thing. I believe one of the reasons World War Z stood out from the mass of zombie fiction out there is because it had a different format: letters. That format made it stand out from the crowd, and I think a novel made primarily out of Q&A ...


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Sounds like you want to write a philosophical novel. Two examples that I can think of are Walker Percey's Lost in the Cosmos and Robert Persig's Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Both of the above are interesting reads, but interesting as philosophical texts, and as approaches to doing philosophy. You would probably not read them for the story alone....



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