Hot answers tagged

3

Tell more stories. If you've built a world, put sentient beings in it and put conflicts in front of them. Let the world unfold in front of your characters, and let the characters talk about the other parts of the world, and the history of it, which haven't been discussed before. Write stories set long before or shortly after your existing series. Link it ...


3

I agree with Lauren Ipsum, byt read from a variety of authors, not just one. In addition, read The Art of war. I know I just gave you more homework, but if you know what each side's strategies are, you could establish that for the reader, then twist things up. I'd also recommend reading the Illiad (or at least the battle scenes). Homer does what you ...


3

It depends. If it's being described from the POV of a human, then it should be ok, the person is merely describing the look in terms they are familiar with, which in turn, the reader redefines to terms they are familiar with. If it's not a necessary detail in the story, though, do you need to include it? Is there a plot reason for a pony tail, or could you ...


2

Before trying to expend it into more than a quadrilogy, publish the first one. Make sure the book is a success and the world appreciated before spending more time on it. Even great authors sometimes create universes that do not resonate with the reader. Sometimes it is a game of try-and-miss. Better fail with one book and spend time developing another ...


1

You might try Critique Circle, which is a free online critiquing community. (I haven't used it, but others here have.) If you have enough rep, you could ask in our Chat Room, the Overlook Hotel. There are a number of members here who are freelance editors who might be able to work with you.


1

I recommend that you look into military theory and historical examples. The subject is larger than life, so well chosen indeed. Some pointers: The Art of War by Sun Tzu The Project Gutenberg version with commentaries included. May sound outdated but it is still being studied today. Thermopylae Some few battle pundits shaming the biggest army the world ...


1

I know in Jurassic Park by Michael Creighton, he described code in a way that emphasized what it DID instead of getting into the intricacies of it. He'd be like "Bob sent a command to locate the virus--the command failed." I don't know if this helps you, but the code was described in such a way that it didn't get in the way of the story. Maybe check it out?


1

Tolkien wrote a wonderful essay called "On Fairy Stories" in which he essentially rejected the notion of suspension of disbelief as an explanation of what is going on when a reader reads any kind of fantasy (and science fiction is a branch of fantasy). Tolkien argued that a story is an act of sub-creation (under God's creation). The author creates a world ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible