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5

The current fashion in screenwriting is to avoid mentions of camera angles and focus on storytelling, but you can certainly mention POV. Some people do this with a slugline. INT. BEDROOM—DAY BILL'S POV Bill fixes his hair in the mirror. But if you're going to do the trick where a mirror image turns out to be the real one, you don't need to mention POV ...


4

Never put camera angles/shots in your screenplay, it screams amateur. You can however cheat to create visual clues. Example: INT. PRISON - DAY A pair of shackled FEET shuffle down the hallway.


3

Let's ignore the details and and focus on the methods of research and proofreading. You need three gun nuts, and two of them should be antique gun nuts. In the general case you need experts, and you need at least two or better three or four, specifically during the research phase you need someone who knows the subject well enough to answer all your ...


2

I would use the natural evolution of the firearm as the starting point. As a gunsmith he might be tempted to try to engineer a modern rifle. But in an army of flintlocks a springfield rifle would be devastating. So his first area might be to find some brass type material, that could be used to construct a percussion cap. So that a modern esque breech ...


2

One helpful guideline is to think of a scene as being continuous in time and place (and perhaps in POV). So if your characters are in one place and they go to another, and your narrative continues with them, that can be a single scene. But if your characters are in one place, and then you jump (discontinuously) to another time or place, the jump would start ...


2

A scene is defined by the meaning we ascribe to the events. Think of real life and how you tell your friend of something that happened. You usually have a clear idea of which of your lifelong, second-by-second experiences belong to that event (and in the narration), and which don't. If you tell of a visit to the dentist, you wont usually start with how you ...


2

I saw this handled in a movie, (It has been a while, so I can't remember which one) but you can just skip it. You have what went before and what happened afterwards, and the shock of the transition to jar the reader. In the movie the script called for the wife to be killed in a car wreck, but the director just filmed her and her husband chatting in the car ...


2

From a practical production standpoint, it's best to write them as two scenes, because for the newscaster's setting and dialogue, it will need to be shot in a separate studio or building, etc. Aside about style: if you're not going to direct it, eliminate shooting directions except where it's absolutely essential to effectively conveying the story. ...


2

It sounds as if your story progresses in a series of "this happens and then that happens" scenes. I think the key is to focus on cause and effect. This happens, and therefore that happens. Take a closer look at Lauren's awesome "plotting backwards" answer that you cite. Every single one of her prompt questions is about cause and effect. Edited to add: I ...


1

Final draft has a SHOT under the ELEMENTS menu I would format it like this... INT. LIVING ROOM - NIGHT Steven watches a news broadcast on TELEVISION (This is in caps to indicate a prop) ON TV (this is how a shot looks in final draft) MALE NEWS REPORTER Blah, blah, blah! ON STEVEN (Shot to indicate a return to the ...


1

How can I determine the goal of a scene/chapter when the main character is entirely passive? This hugely depends on what kind of a book you're writing: genre, audience, message. And the kind of a character you're trying to create. If becoming active and bold is part of his character arc, his goal in the first scene can just be for the evacuation to go ...


1

I think maybe you need to look at the difference between being "passive" in the sense of not making decisions or "passive" in the case of not caring. The situation you've described seems like your character is the first kind of passive. If he's also the second kind of passive, things will be trickier. But if it's just the first kind of passive... if it's an ...


1

You don't want your character to be passive throughout your novel, but I don't see any issues with him being passive in the first chapter if that sets the scene. A consistently passive or reactive character is hard to make compelling, but even the most proactive person sometimes finds herself in situations beyond her control. I just wouldn't extend it for ...


1

IT will be confusing for some people. But are you going to use indicators to set them apart or just let them figure it out? Also, is that scene order going to be same throughout the entire story or are you just going to keep it that way for a few chapters? Eventually, if the readers really want to understand the book, they'll read rest of it and wouldn't be ...


1

"The openings of my novels seem fine. This may be because they are generally only one scene long. But it may also be because I develop them differently than the rest of the plot." In that case, treat each scene as the "opening" of the rest of the novel. Develop it as you would develop the real opening, rather than the "rest of the plot." That way, your ...


1

You can use Lauren's method to develop your plot, but I wouldn't advise you to write backwards. In my opinion you should always write every text in the order that it will be read. As you progress from one part to the next you will automatically create transitions from one part to the next, because that is how the mind works. If you work backwards, you'll ...


1

Sequence is all and well, but don't forget your character development. And while we are at it remember that in the real world, everyone in the star of their own story. So you have the order of events, but if the story is that simple, it is just a tale. Remember Eddie will put rabbit ears on anybody whenever there is a camera pointed at them, and Bob used to ...



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