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9

Having read parts of your writing(s) I must say: your writings are bad. Not pleased to be rude, but your writings is worse than the worst vulgar propaganda. I have no problem with Christians, Jews, Muslims and most religious people. But your book deserves to be utterly reworked. Although declared that you were writing on religion, in fact, the book is ...


9

If your work is appealing, it should work. Have you ever asked for a book to a friend, read it, fell in love with it, and started buying everything by that author? It happened to me with the Wheel of Time series, and with Jules Verne's works. So, by giving away the books, you're doing what a friend would do: give you the chance to know the author, the ...


8

Tread with caution. A lot of caution. Free stories to promote the author is a marketing strategy. As such, there are situations where it can be wonderful; situations it can be disastrous; situations it can be utterly harmless and entirely insignificant. I think these are the central questions you've got to ask yourself when considering writing freebies ...


7

Plainly speaking: your book is one amongst millions. People won't find it by sheer serendipity. And they won't bother picking it up unless something persuades them they should. To sell a book, you've pretty much got two options: you either need to succeed on strength of your writing, by selling the book to a publisher who'll do the marketing for you; or ...


6

Start marketing to atheists?  


5

Religious books tend to have an extremely small market. They very rarely hit the best-seller charts. But you're not going to hit the best seller charts by self-publishing with CreateSpace no matter what. Bestsellers take amazing plot/writing, a lot of marketing, and luck. People aren't going to magically find your book - you need to advertise it, get ...


4

I can offer no evidence, but speaking as a reader, it would make me more likely to purchase a book if I had read and enjoyed the writer's freebies. Because I've already seen the writer's skill, style, and characters, and decided whether the writer was appealing to me After a coupla freebies I start to feel like I owe the person something, and should ...


3

You're assuming that the choice is between "sell a book through a channel where I make $1 per copy" versus "sell a book through a channel where I make $5 per copy" (or whatever the numbers are). But unless you are a very famous author, the choice is almost ALWAYS between, "sell a book for $1 per copy" versus "not sell a book to that potential customer". ...


3

One of the most difficult challenges of being a self-published writer is having to do the self-promoting and the self-distributing that comes along with it. There are so many different options to consider and so many different factors to take into consideration, and I can guarantee these questions have been asked at least a thousand times on a thousand ...


3

If the store gets 40% of the sale price, with a guaranteed minimum of $35 over 6 months, then that sounds reasonable. After all, it costs them money to provide you with shelf space, whether your book sells or not. But 40% PLUS the $35 seems unfair. To me. It seems like they don't want to run any risk of your book being a flop, but they also want to ...


2

I think the important part about any kind of giveaway is to make it part of a marketing plan. I know the words "marketing plan" are rife with tedium and the apprehension associated with the buzz word but that's just because marketing has become something done by people with no connection to the products they're trying to get people to buy. For the artist or ...


2

Keep in mind, an agent has more functions than just to sell your book. Having sold a book to a major publisher without an agent, I can certainly attest that it is possible. However, in hindsight, I would have been better off getting one. Unless you want to become an expert in the business of books, and you have time and opportunity to hobnob with ...


1

You need to negotiate when publishing the cases in which the rights revert to you if the book goes out of print. (I suppose today one would also have to negotiate whether a POD book is considered out of print or how long it remains POD only for it to be considered out of print.) Do you want to make digital editions of your work be free of DRM? Do you want ...


1

I'm not an expert in the subject, but I've recently done a lot of research into this myself. From what I can gather, nowadays publishers are almost entirely likely to dismiss a piece of writing (whether it's a novel or a children's book) if it is not sent to them from an agency. This is because they get thousands of submissions weekly, so it is their first ...


1

My guess is that the average reader does not know Lulu and CreateSpace from any other online store. But some people would recognize those as POD companies. And some of those would guess that you are a small publisher. And some of those would assume that your book is less professional than a traditional publisher's book. Here's the reason I don't link to my ...


1

If you sell through CreateSpace, you can link to the work on Amazon. Since like every book known to man is on Amazon, you should be fine. What I have done is made the eBook separately and put on Amazon and then published the print version and then through the Amazon Author program I linked the two together. As long as you aren't using KDP Select ...


1

By "narrow keywords" do you mean long tail keywords or highly niche-specific keywords? Long tail keywords are much more descriptive/qualified (think "shoes" versus "red satin dancing shoes for children") and as such may target leads further along the sales funnel. A study published in Search Engine Watch did find long tail keywords to be associated with ...


1

I found this interview with the president of the Young Adult Library Services (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). She mentions that there are very few male readers of YA fiction, but that boys tend to read nonfiction on subjects that interest them. I've attended YA writing panels at SF conventions, and almost all of the published ...


1

In this link from Jun 2013, they say that in the UK, the total of ebooks sold are 12%. However, Sci-Fi has about 20% of ebook sales. It provides some links in English, but I couldn't find more info for free. Only some research to buy (and I'm not going to pay for it).



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