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11

As you say, DOIs are becoming dominate in scientific publishing, so it would be useful to have one in that arena. On the other hand ISBN (And it's cousin, the ISSN) are still the main way to identify a publication. There is also a lot of useful things that the ISBN number is used for. Right now you can put an ISBN number into pretty much any bookseller (or ...


8

There are almost no rules which have "no exceptions." (Which ones are the "no exceptions" is an exercise left to the student.) Your writing tends to be flowy and lyrical. Tightening it up does add some motion and spark to it. I wouldn't tighten everything, because sometimes you want "flowy and lyrical." I think tightening in general is a good thing, but ...


4

There is no answer. "3" (if you can actually count them) side-stories can be too much. Even 1 can... if you want to write (or rather, if the story demands to be) a simple story. 3 can be too many. But 100 can be just right. It depends. Haven't read the Wheel of Time yet, but I've heard it contains lots of side-stories. Too many? Some surely think so, ...


4

This sounds like a very scientific approach to something that's not a science. :-) In any case, Wikipedia's article on Genre Fiction is probably as good a place to start as any. From there, you can click on links for more detailed analyses of genres that look interesting to you. That said, you're not actually going to be able to effectively mix genres ...


3

In a way, the advice to cut out unnecessary words is solid advice. The trouble is working out what is "unnecessary". By the time you can work that out, you probably don't need the advice any more. Too many writers think it means that every word needs to be communicating new information, which is fine if you are just trying to get facts across. But in ...


2

I'm not sure there is a hard and fast number, but there are other ways you can measure if the side story is acceptable. What does having it in your story achieve. If it's just there to fill out the word count is it worth having it there at all? On the other hand, if the story story helps move the plot along or helps develop the characters it might be worth ...


2

Yes, there is a respected rule: Skip the boring stuff! It depends on your story, on your style and what you want to show. If you have a gunslinger and you want to establish how good he is, you may want to describe in detail his fight against five other people which only lasts a few seconds to a minute. If the reader already knows how good he is, just ...


2

There are no rules; there is only what works, and you have to be the judge of that. But there are aids. Whenever you write multiple works using the same characters, you should keep a concordance. This is a set of notes about characters and plot points, which you can refer to later when you forget what color hair a character has or who said or did what to ...


1

No rules. But some guidelines: Try to stay consistent with the layout of the gaps. There are traditionally two allowed "zones of sparsity": Prologue and epilogue. Other than that, progression should be mostly linear. Bigger gaps are allowed but mark them as such. Four months in a coma shouldn't be a three-asterisk break. It should be a start of another ...


1

Time lapses, time advancements are used to move the story forward per plot situation, tempo, and cohesiveness. If your story is going to span several generations of characters...well, then, you are going to move the story forward (skipping the non-pertainent boring crap) by time advancements. If your story is going to stay in the moment, perhaps spanning ...



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