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14

I can't say if it's reasonable or not, but it's not unheard of. There is also the fact that the editor does like your story. The biggest pro of going through with this is that you get your story published, but is it worth it? As you said, you are changing the timbre of the piece, and if it makes it something you're not happy with it might not be worth doing ...


12

It is always a good idea for readers to provide feedback to the authors. When authors read their work they don't get the same experience as the reader. Most books' authors will have a way for you to contact them about their books. You said it has a forum; you should see if that is an appropriate place for suggestions on the book. If the author has a personal ...


11

It's hard to be too specific without seeing your writing, and I certainly have nothing close to an algorithm for you, but I was caught by your idea of reverse-engineering an outline. Does that mean that you didn't write from an outline to begin with? If so, and if you're having trouble with organization (as I assume you are, since you mention order, topic ...


9

It is almost always worth editing. Even if it's Murder She Wrote / Star Wars crossover fanfiction that there will never be a market to publish, it's still worth practicing the art of editing. You took the time to write the story in the first place. Why not craft the best story you can? I think something that's often overlooked by inexperienced writers is ...


9

There are two concepts in git that can help: branches and tags. Tags. Think of a tag as a name for a specific revision. Any time you want to remember a version, create a tag for it. For example, when you finish a draft, you can tag it like this: git tag first_draft When to use tags. Tags are good for marking any version that you might want to remember ...


8

Sure, go for it. One of my favorite books has two entire chapters where the name of one of the major characters is misspelled in every single reference. This was fixed in later editions. If it was intentional, the author may appreciate a chance to explain it. If it was a mistake, the publishing house would probably like a chance to fix it. In either case, ...


7

Without going back to an outline, you could do the following: Print your draft on paper. Take some fluoresecent colored pens and mark all the words that are specific to your paper. Not words like "the" and "research", but words like "unification algorithm" or "eukaryotic cell". Use different colors for different topics in your paper. If you see the same ...


6

First of all, you should check and see if they have any guidelines posted that will help you to be certain that you stay within their listed range. If they don't have anything listed, then you could send them an inquiry to try to find out. Generally, the word count would not include the title page, if you have one. Words used in tables or graphs, ...


6

I'll throw out the need for some space. I might not go right back to something, so, yes, I'd move on to another story. But that doesn't mean you abandon it completely. There's a balance you must strike. If you get stuck revising something to the point you can't work on something else, I don't see that as helpful. Revisit the story later. You never ...


6

Ryan, you cannot guess what will be interesting to your readers. Viktor Frankl, when he wrote his classic book "Man's search for meaning", didn't want to share his personal story first, as he thought it would look like he wanted sympathy, and distract from his message. Yet because of his personal story, his book became a best seller, and helped expand his ...


5

If you think there is too much exposition, there probably is. Then again, even if you don't think so, the reader may. The fact that you are questioning is the important part. Asking these questions forces you to make choices. Making decisions (and sticking to them) is a crucial part of the process. I would say that pretty much anything can be ...


5

Just speaking for myself, I have found it most helpful and useful to be merciless to eliminate all of the words that I can, including especially those pesky adjectival embellishments; locate and expunge all of the multisyllabic Latinate words, replacing them with their Anglo-Saxon equivalents. To apply those rules to the lines above, I do a first pass to ...


5

The technique that has been most useful to me is to begin each section, paragraph, and sentence with information that readers already know, and move new information to or toward the end. I learned the technique from Joseph M. Williams's terrific book Style, which is chock full of ideas about how write with clarity and grace. Similar is Martha Kolnn's ...


5

This sounds like a job for... Scrivener! :D Building on Kate's question: Create your outline. Write each section of your outline as a separate Scrivener document. Label them appropriately. (II/A/3, III/B/4/i) Once it's all on paper, you can rearrange the sections however you need. If you find yourself writing extra analyses, create new individual ...


5

I kind of doubt that there is a standard for it, at least. You might get away with using some marker that isn't used anywhere else, like ###, to indicate a changed passage, but I'm not sure if that really qualifies as markup. In any case, it would have to be an agreement between the people involved which marker(s) to use and what they mean. Something like ...


5

A "draft" is one complete pass-through of writing a piece (an article, blog post, short story, novella, novel, etc.). Your "first draft" is generally considered the first time you commit the entire thing to paper (or pixels), from beginning to end. After that, you can measure subsequent drafts or rounds however you like. It's reasonable to divide them as ...


4

Because I said so myself, let me answer your question: No, you do not have to. If you look at the answer you linked to or at mine above, you see that they suggest techniques which aren't easy to follow on screen. Both answers suggest to mark your printed text using pens one way or another. Printing out, grabbing pens, start marking is one thing: easy. If ...


4

Personally I'm not interested in this particular feature, but I know people that are. It's obvious why writers haven't used version control systems: until recently, they were all terrible. Svn? CVS? God help you. Mercurial isn't so bad, but it is designed around programming, and it's still pretty arcane for your average user. I think Versions might bring ...


4

This isn't a binary choice. You don't need to view this as a "take it or leave it" decision - this is something you can talk to your editor about. And you don't need to choose between your ending and your editor's proposed ending - you can write a third ending, a fourth, a fifth, a sixteenth if need be. Odds are, both you and your editor have valid ...


4

Based on my 25+ years of academic co-authorship: Your co-author definitely won't feel free to change everything unless you tell him so directly. Don't feel awkward. Some people fall in love with their first draft and only want the co-author to "improve" it but not "change" it. If it's a really good first draft that's not so bad, as it will speed ...


3

You can always shop it to someone else. The bottom line is, are they going to pick up your story without that change? If they are, then you can ignore the request, and if they're not, you have to decide if you need the money more than you want the ending.


3

Is there a good reason for the expository sections to be in the book? If you were to remove them entirely, would the book suffer? If the answers to both of these questions is "no", then I suggest removing these sections entirely, or at the least paring them down. However, things are rarely so simple. Sometimes writers put scenes in a book simply for color, ...


3

Yes, self-doubt is part of the process. Write it, polish it as much as you can bear, and hand it off to some friends who are capable of giving you good feedback. Or find a professional editor. Particularly for an autobiography, you should get an outside opinion (or six) about what in your life might interest others.


3

I edit everything I write. But this is because if I can't bring myself to care enough about sitting and nursing it after the first draft then I don't care enough to write it in the first place.


3

There are some stories that are just there to get thoughts out of your head. For me, if it's a complete story and something that I have the slightest interest in after I have finished a draft, I'll revise it. It may not happen right away, but give it a while and go back for a revision. My reasoning behind this is it helps with the stories you ARE ...


2

Caveat: I assume you have a backup of your work (using a version control software would be also beneficial here). Go through every section/sentence. When you find stuff that could belong to a different chapter, name or number it and put this name into a reference list for this different chapter. E.g. the chapter is about cars from Porsche, then name the ...


2

Celtx offered version control several years ago. I got excited about that, and then I never used it. Version control systems are popular in software because rolling back in time is not uncommon (and, at worst, frequent). Writing, though, usually pushes forward. You almost never roll back to an early version of a file. Draft, perhaps.


2

@Kate The first time around, I have a nice outline with a logical flow, the second time around, the flow has been lost, and I am interested in knowing the steps and order of steps required to put Humpty back together again. – David 14 hours ago For the future: Your problem is that you start editing and fixing your second round with the prose version instead ...


2

Adobe InDesign has Version Cue. And in newer versions there's Adobe Drive.



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