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14

Cover letters are tricky, because if you're writing a CL for a traditional job you're probably competing with somewhere between 50 and 300 other applicants. This means HR has to find a fast way of filtering the wheat from the chaff. Your resume is generally the first thing an HR person looks at. If you make it past the first screening, your cover letter may ...


8

You're focusing on the wrong angle. Think about it this way: why would a potential employer care that you wrote a report? What skill set does it show you have? What does it prove you could do again? So think about the report: Why did you write the report? For whom? Boss, peers, IT, management, accounting? What are they going to do with the report when ...


8

It depends on the purpose of including that URL in the first place. If it is a "here's more info about me" site, I'd say put it with your name, address, and email. If it is an example of work you did for a particular employer, then then that block of your employment section makes sense. If it is for a portfolio site, maybe front and center, under your ...


7

The best date formats are the ones that are (1) clear and (2) familiar to your audience. You want your readers to focus on the content of your resume/CV, and this will be difficult if they have to "translate" dates to a familiar format in their heads while reading. In general, the two extremes - long, unambiguous dates verses shorter, more informal dates - ...


6

There are actually quite a few options, many of which come naturally when you're not forced to consciously write formally. You can change the verb into an –ing: "Having done freelance for 8 years, I..." "Choosing to work from home has..." or in some cases turn the verb into the subject or your sentence. "Experience with Java has helped..." ...


6

Keep the style consistent across the whole document, no matter how short the paragraphs. If you indent any paragraph above a list, keep doing so. There are various guidelines if you should indent or not, but none of them are solid rules. Consistency is an ancient rule of style though. So, no rule, but don't make exceptions for short lines. If you want a ...


6

Evaluating resume stuff in a vacuum is really hard. That being said, a couple of thoughts: In general, I think you're approaching the problem incorrectly. You're trying to write an Objective statement. Everyone knows you're looking for a job, otherwise you wouldn't be submitting your resume, so re-stating this is redundant. Your style is overly stiff; ...


6

My resume has, centered up top in the header: my name | email | phone. If I were going to put in my URL, I would add another pipe and put it in, probably omitting the http:// Alternatively, I sometimes put it in my cover letter/intro email if I feel it's relevant. E.g.: Regards, First Last Phone URL


6

As a former employer I agree that most employers don't care about reports that you might have written. You need to stress knowledge and experience in a resume. If you have no experience (that the company can use) the best you might be able to do is show knowledge in a way that someone might ask you a question in an interview. And unless the company you are ...


4

By "preamble" do you mean "cover letter"? This is too conversational to go on an actual resume. "My name is Korvin Szanto" is a complete sentence and it therefore takes a period afterward. (It is also most likely redundant because your name is probably already at the top of your resume or cover letter, and at the bottom of the latter.) There's not too ...


4

Your question 1 is too long, but where you should break it is not where you broke it. The information about the professor is a sidenote and is a parenthetical remark if ever I saw one. Also, you can't "carry out" a degree, and "I hold a degree that was earned" is verbose; "I earned my degree" would be more concise. So my suggestion is: I earned my ...


4

There are probably about as many ways to write a CV as there are people who have ever read or written at least one. You might want to include at least also an e-mail address in the contact details section. One thing you would put into the Additional section (unless you add a specific section for it) is any (professional) references. I simply wrote a fairly ...


4

I think you're in a bit of a bind here. I think you'll have an easy time getting "does this work for you?" feedback, which is crucial. However, I think you'll find it very difficult to find constructive, "here is how you can make your letter awesome" feedback. Let me explain. You're trying to be attention-grabbing and evocative. Notice that this is ...


3

Bear in mind that a compact numerical date format like 01/02/2013 uses a different convention in the US than in Europe. In the US it's interpreted as month/day/year, while in Europe it's day/month/year. So if you're writing a document that might be read in both hemispheres, I'd avoid the compact form. If it's only one or the other, less of an issue. A form ...


3

If you did it for educational credit, put it with Education. If you did it in a field which happens to be the one in which you got your degree, but your university didn't care one way or the other, put it under Work. Timeframe is always just dates: September 2008–May 2010.


3

Objective statements are generally old school these days. I'd eliminate it altogether. If you think its important, you can simply state the objective title at the top of the resume (i.e. MARKETING ANALYST). After that, I would focus on highlighting what you bring to the table. Its common (though not always used) to start with a summary paragraph that ...


3

If your first language isn't English and you write your CV in English, find a native speaker who can correct your errors. English CVs start listing the previous jobs/education with the newest topic (your last job) and go down to the oldest (where you went to school). In Germany, for example, it's the other way around. But you do not have to follow that ...


2

A sentence fragment is fine, as complete sentences usually aren't necessary on résumés. How about: To use and continue developing my organizational skills, education, and ability to work well with people. This is a résumé. You use it to look for a job. So it's redundant in a way to say you want to "obtain a position." I changed "sharpen" to "continue ...


2

First of all, don't let yourself be intimidated by this effort. You need to be yourself and remain respectful, and you will be fine. I would recommend opening your letter with a standard salutation: "Dear Sir", or simply "Professor Xxxxx". Next, introduce yourself and briefly explain your reason for writing. Follow up with a brief summary of your work ...


2

I agree with Lauren Ipsum's answer. Some additional points: The paragraph you posted for the cover letter talks about what you want to do, but you've actually done this. Call that out; lots of people have aspirations, but you've got solid experience. Consider working in something like the following: My current position allows me to go beyond the ...


2

Been there, done that, designed the T-shirt. Some suggested bullet points, mix and match as needed: Acted as secondary point-of-contact with clients Assisted Account Managers in dealing with client contacts Acted as junior Account Manger. Handled significant direct client contact. Upsold existing clients, generated new leads. Be blunt about what you did. ...


1

Instead of saying, "I have experience with X," consider describing what you did with X. "I created a global meteor defense system using Java and Arduino."


1

I recommend leaving the "objective" off the resume, and saving it for your cover letter. Use the limited space in your resume to summarize your experience and qualities in two or three short paragraphs, then follow the general reverse-chronological format for experience, education and skills. I also concur with Mary Aho, about simply stating your name and ...


1

Your objective is too self-centered - provide benefits to your prospective employer: To use and develop my strong organizational and interpersonal skills for mutual benefit in a challenging and stimulating environment.


1

As usual, simple is better, and this is a bit wordy. Are 'position' and 'work environment' so different that they need to be expressed separately? I'm not sure on that one. But in terms of the rest, I think the same meaning would be conveyed by: To obtain a position and work environment that will enable me to use and sharpen my strong organizational ...


1

I'm thinking about doing it with my name aligned (justified?) to the top left corner my website minus http:// aligned to the top right corner remaining contact information below this aligned to one side or the other in left, right, left sequence. Feel free to upvote or downvote my answer so that I can get a feeling for whether or not this is generally a ...



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