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7

For color-to-name converter, a quick Google search gives me this link: http://chir.ag/projects/name-that-color/#C0C0C0 In which you can just pick a color from the color wheel to see its name. Perhaps the color you want is "Mercury" But, as Phillipp said, you might better explain the color in words more frequently used, instead of using some rather ...


4

I don't know about free ones. Dean Wesley Smith's workshops and lectures have been tremendously helpful for me. Dean's workshops cost $300 each, and run for six weeks. Each week, you get about an hour of video instruction, and a homework assignment that will stretch and challenge you. You get brief, helpful personal response from Dean about your assignment. ...


4

The difference between a successful writer and a wannabe writer is that the latter says that "unfortunately I don't know anyone in the field," whereas the successful writer grabs a copy of the yellow pages, finds a doctor, and makes an appointment. A further difference is that the wannabe writer uses Google to find information, and that the successful ...


4

Seek medical advice. Find a medical or health care professional who will answer your questions. If you can't figure it out from a book, find a doctor, nurse, EMT, etc. who is willing to sit down with you for half an hour.


4

Although not a slave in the sense you're describing, I would recommend reading Nelson Mandela's first volume of his auto biography, Long Walk To Freedom. What is quite interesting in this book is that he starts off not really seeing the injustice of his situation, or that of his people, primarily because of where he is raised, how he is raised, the ...


4

Sounds like from the description, you are writing a "slave narrative." This was a popular literary genre in the US around the Civil War. It can either be fiction or non-fiction. One of the most famous examples and my personal suggestion is the Life of Fredrick Douglas. He was born a slave and later became a leader in the American Abolition Movement. What I ...


3

There are definitely some great resources out there. If you're into creative nonfiction, I would check out: Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writer's Guide from the Neiman Foundation at Harvard University by Mark Kramer. It's essentially a collection of essays from various nonfiction contributors that contains a lot of great advice that can help you ...


3

If you're looking for first-hand accounts, I'd recommend Ten Years a Slave. It's an autobiographical account of a free black man who was forced into slavery, and it's pretty shocking. It was also made into a (wonderful/horrific) film last year, which I'd recommend looking out for. For a short-read, there's A Letter to my Old Master, a letter - believed to ...


3

I have found character sheets for online roleplayers in MMOs to be very helpful for fleshing out characters; after all, the main thing that their writing is based off of is their character and the world. Obviously some points have been added to the character sheets to accomodate the peculiarities of the fantasy/game world, but they're easy enough to ...


3

When used sparingly or in the right context, archaic language can be fun. I won't argue any literary position, but to answer the OP's question about services or rules, incase anyone (or a future visitor) is curious, this is what I found. Here are a few automated services : http://whilstr.org/ http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk ...


3

There is an English language course on The Future of Storytelling on Iversity. The focus, as the course title implies, is on more recent developments in storytelling such as interactive and transmedia storytelling. The course is introductory and provides an overview of storytelling theory, not actual writing training. Its a good starting point, but you will ...


3

The Macquarie Dictionary is usually considered the most reliable source for Australian English words, and Australian usage. There are a range of editions in print, as well as the (paywall) online version. Another option is the Australian National Dictionary, although it focuses on purely "Australian" words and their first usage. Rather than the real ...


3

I love the apps linked in the other answers, but I see a basic problem with this whole question. Let's try an experiment. Choose three color names that for you describe a very specific color. Now give these names to a few people and ask them to select all the colors that would fit that color term from this color chart: http://www.pantone-colours.com/ How ...


2

I would recommend you to describe the hair of that character as "white" or "grey". Maybe "silver" when you want to be a bit more lyrical, but that's the furthest I would go into detail about the haircolor. The artist of that image likely decided to put a tiny bit of yellow into the color-shade, because pure shades of grey generally look boring and sterile ...


2

Here are two sites that you might want to check out: http://kodisha.net/color-names/?color=FF91A4 http://www.colorhexa.com/ff91a4


2

I learned that in APA a reference only refers to the current or preceding sentence, and that you should signify a continued reference through backreference. Here the second sentence refers to the article by Bob and Paul, because the "they" takes up the preceding sencence's subject: In their study, Bob and Paul (1999) found that some boys like girls. ...


2

Well I am not sure if there is a reference book that will tell you everything but there are quite a few guides around that should cover most of it. Here are a list of few books (not really following any referencing standard here): Handbook for Technical Writing by James H. Shelton The Elements of International English Style: A Guide to Writing ...


2

It depends what you mean by 'archaic'. For a wider cultural reference to Archaic England, see Harold Bayley's Archaic England. Halliwell's dictionary covers 14th century usage, and is particularly good on dialects. It references other works which you may find useful for other periods. Sweet's work is Anglo-Saxon in focus. There are several region-specific ...


2

In my experience, as a general rule-of-thumb, if you look at the number of reviews a book has on Amazon and multiply by 100, you'll be in the ballpark of their sales on Amazon. Some books might be double or quadruple this, and others might be half or less, but it gives you a general idea of whether you're talking about a book that sold 1,000 copies, 10,000 ...


2

A good visual dictionary has appealing illustrations that clearly communicate the intended meaning. Good illustrations are what sell a visual dictionaly (or attract web site visitors), and quality usually has its price, because most frequently it is caused by a lengthy and expensive education as an illustrator or photographer. There are sites such as ...


1

That kind reference work is called a thesaurus. It's similar to a dictionary of synonyms, but the words grouped together do not mean exactly the same - they just have related meanings by similitude or context. To get words only from a specific domain, you can find a thematic thesaurus that is specialized for words relevant to it. Using your example, here is ...


1

William Zinsser’s “On Writing Well” is the one I would suggest. (I am not an English native.) It provides sections on how to write about people, places, sports, business, the arts, and yourself. One can find many tips and instructions on how to turn an average prose – even in the form of email, personal letter, office notes etc - into a tight, clean and ...


1

For American English, Strunk & White or Garner's MAU. For British English, Fowler (updated edition) or style guides from the Guardian, Economist or BBC. Source: http://xkcd.com/923/ (image licensed CC BY-NC 2.5) See also: 'Style guide' @ Wikipedia (scroll down for a big list)


1

I would suggest: Creating Unforgettable Characters by Linda Seger. This is actually listed as recommended reading for applicants to ABC network's writing fellowship. 45 Master Characters and A Writer's Guide to Characterization by Victoria Schmidt. Reviews for these can come off mixed, but I like how Schmidt uses the hero's journey and mythological ...


1

Looking back at my own writing, my recommendation is: You'll have to find out yourself. There are two main directions writing can take, often called "outline" and "no outline". The no outline approach means that you sit down with the seed of an idea (a scene, a character, a first sentence) and just start writing, letting yourself be surprised by where the ...


1

Well, there's the aptly titled "The Blackmail Ring", a 1932 pulp thriller by Walter B. Gibson. Other than that, searching for fiction about blackmail just seems to turn up a lot of romance novels. Actually, the fact that it doesn't seem to be a popular novel topic can be in your favor. It won't be a setting that readers are intimately familiar with (unlike, ...


1

Instead of White's book, you might want to check out Joseph Williams' Style: Towards Clarity and Grace. It's much better. There are several widely differing editions. Use the original Chicago Press, 1990 edition or the Harper Collins, 4th edition 1993. All the other editions have been mangled in various ways.


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I think this may be somewhat what you mean http://www.visuwords.com/ It can be a little difficult to use but sometimes comes up with some great words. I will occasionally check out a word and then look at the synonyms of its synonyms, but always use caution with the thesaurus and make sure the word is used correctly. Also connotations are subject to changes ...


1

Why not just put a blindfold on and walk around your house for a few hours? Take notes into a recorder or a voice note app about what you're feeling, thinking, smelling, hearing, about whether other senses have sharpened, if you're slowing down, etc. Additionally, the children's book Follow My Leader is quite good about showing how a previously sighted boy ...


1

http://www.rhymedesk.com is quite good. It has more extensive list of near rhymes than on other sites. Also you can conveniently write your texts and search for words on the same page.



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