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4

I don't know about free ones. Dean Wesley Smith's workshops and lectures have been tremendously helpful for me. Dean's workshops cost $300 each, and run for six weeks. Each week, you get about an hour of video instruction, and a homework assignment that will stretch and challenge you. You get brief, helpful personal response from Dean about your assignment. ...


4

Although not a slave in the sense you're describing, I would recommend reading Nelson Mandela's first volume of his auto biography, Long Walk To Freedom. What is quite interesting in this book is that he starts off not really seeing the injustice of his situation, or that of his people, primarily because of where he is raised, how he is raised, the ...


4

Sounds like from the description, you are writing a "slave narrative." This was a popular literary genre in the US around the Civil War. It can either be fiction or non-fiction. One of the most famous examples and my personal suggestion is the Life of Fredrick Douglas. He was born a slave and later became a leader in the American Abolition Movement. What I ...


3

There is an English language course on The Future of Storytelling on Iversity. The focus, as the course title implies, is on more recent developments in storytelling such as interactive and transmedia storytelling. The course is introductory and provides an overview of storytelling theory, not actual writing training. Its a good starting point, but you will ...


3

The Macquarie Dictionary is usually considered the most reliable source for Australian English words, and Australian usage. There are a range of editions in print, as well as the (paywall) online version. Another option is the Australian National Dictionary, although it focuses on purely "Australian" words and their first usage. Rather than the real ...


3

If you're looking for first-hand accounts, I'd recommend Ten Years a Slave. It's an autobiographical account of a free black man who was forced into slavery, and it's pretty shocking. It was also made into a (wonderful/horrific) film last year, which I'd recommend looking out for. For a short-read, there's A Letter to my Old Master, a letter - believed to ...


2

In addition to academic knowledge about child development, there's nothing like experiencing real children and seeing how they respond to books. If you don't have young children in your life, I'd suggest "borrowing" some who are within your target age-range and willing to help. See if they understand your story (ask them to explain it-- they may have reached ...


2

Your question relates to the developmental psychology of children more than their capacity to decode text. As such it has very little to do with chronological age because there is so much variation across individuals. Even though publishers (or booksellers) may want to use labels such as 5-7 year-olds, these are essentially meaningless. The issue is not ...


2

It depends what you mean by 'archaic'. For a wider cultural reference to Archaic England, see Harold Bayley's Archaic England. Halliwell's dictionary covers 14th century usage, and is particularly good on dialects. It references other works which you may find useful for other periods. Sweet's work is Anglo-Saxon in focus. There are several region-specific ...


2

I learned that in APA a reference only refers to the current or preceding sentence, and that you should signify a continued reference through backreference. Here the second sentence refers to the article by Bob and Paul, because the "they" takes up the preceding sencence's subject: In their study, Bob and Paul (1999) found that some boys like girls. ...


2

Well I am not sure if there is a reference book that will tell you everything but there are quite a few guides around that should cover most of it. Here are a list of few books (not really following any referencing standard here): Handbook for Technical Writing by James H. Shelton The Elements of International English Style: A Guide to Writing ...


1

I think this may be somewhat what you mean http://www.visuwords.com/ It can be a little difficult to use but sometimes comes up with some great words. I will occasionally check out a word and then look at the synonyms of its synonyms, but always use caution with the thesaurus and make sure the word is used correctly. Also connotations are subject to changes ...


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It's important to keep in mind that children learn to read at slightly different ages and that reading comprehension/ability can vary greatly even among kids the same age. There could be some who are ready to read Harry Potter by themselves starting in first grade (6-7 years old) while their classmates could just be starting to make the shift to easy chapter ...


1

I saw an effective example of this in 1634: The Baltic War (David Weber & Eric Flint) recently. The factors that made it work were: The background speech was in italics (as you've done here). The passages of background speech began and ended in the middle of sentences. There wasn't a lot of back-and-forth; for every speech chunk there were at least a ...


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Some of the websites mentioned here can help you to find one word for a complete sentence or a phrase. Please have a look at them : 1) http://www.vedicaptitude.com/?page_id=87 2) http://targetstudy.com/one-word-substitution/ and more...


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Recently, I made Scribodroid. It is a program for synonyms, collocations, rhymes and definitions. It searches online dictionaries and works as a pop-up tool in any word editing program. It can be very useful sometimes.


1

Instead of White's book, you might want to check out Joseph Williams' Style: Towards Clarity and Grace. It's much better. There are several widely differing editions. Use the original Chicago Press, 1990 edition or the Harper Collins, 4th edition 1993. All the other editions have been mangled in various ways.


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Two resources that have helped me get to know my own characters more deeply: What Would Your Character Do? by Eric and Ann Maisel and The Complete Book of Questions by Garry Poole. (Simply answer the questions as though you are in the character's point of view.)


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Having books to teach you those fundamentals is great. But, perhaps you don't need a book at all if your purpose is to learn the basics. There are a lot of resources online where you can learn the building blocks of the craft of writing. Here are some websites that I find quite informative and useful: DailyWritingTips (http://www.dailywritingtips.com/) ...



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