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You might have a look at the Little Details community on LiveJournal. The administrators describe the purpose of the site as follows: We have a large, diverse membership that can answer questions such as: "If I hit my character on the head like so, what will happen?" "Will this destroy the Earth?" All types of fiction writers--...


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I don't think it's productive to look for one web site that would answer any question you might have as a writer. The expertise required would be too broad. I think it would make more sense to go to web sites specifically targeted to your question. A writer might well have questions ranging from "what are common names that people give to pets in London" to "...


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I can suggest reddit.com/r/[country/city name] - it will get you answers from any half-civilized moderately populated part of the world. Just take the answers with a grain of salt. You're likely to get some regional inside joke answers and the likes among them. You really shouldn't ask the locals for "Wpierdol" when visiting Nowa Huta.


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So I don't actually think anyone could provide you with a useful list of books here, because individuality, different approaches, style, subjectivity, blah blah all that. But an approach that works is this: read what you like, be it sci fi, fantasy, whatever. Harry Potter. Then sift through interviews and wikis of the authors you admire, and find their ...


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Yes, others write microfiction. (I write 100-word stories.) There are several journals (online and print) that publish it. You don't ask about publishing, but you could start with @Tiny_Text and 100WordStory. Cupboard publishes really interesting chapbooks of tiny fiction. I don't know of any online communities, but they might be out there.


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If you are contemplating about mediaeval warfare with longsword type weapons, try reenactors. These people are actually researching what can, cannot be done with the means at the time. This includes fighting in full plate using realistic swords. There are lots of visuals to be found but best would be to seek out a group from a compatible age and go ...


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It is worthwhile also searching for flash-fiction; although this can be up to 1000 words it will often be shorter. Also 'drabble' is another name for works of circa 100 word lengths. I myself write humorous flash-fiction, but don't really belong to any communities.


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yWriter also keeps a timeline for each viewpoint character and keeps track of characters, locations, and objects present on a scene-by-scene basis.


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Other than Scrivener, already noted above, Excel or another spreadsheet program might be what you need here. In your first column you have your scene or other outline notation to identify where your character is in the story, and then your subsequent columns are Food Remaining or Location or whatever. If you want to get real fancy-schmancy, you can even use ...


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Check out the forums at National Novel Writing Month's site. It looks like they've reorganized things since I've participated, but the Reference Desk forum is probably where you can ask stuff like that. Of course, it's most populated during NaNoWriMo (November), but the site's up all year.


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It feels like you're asking for a literary canon, but really, I don't think there is one any more. Things are a lot more wide-open, with a lot less dead-white-male worship. In terms of books that were really important to me (not that I'm a literary writer, but I tend to be a literary reader)... they've changed as time goes on. When I first read The Color ...


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It isn't what you read, but what you write that makes you great. What do you mean by 'literary writer'? Do you mean James Joyce? Also, although we can identify loads of popular fiction that is bad writing, surely agreeing what is good writing and therefore choosing a list of novels is extremely subjective.


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Inferring that reading the right books can save someone from being a bad writer is ludicrous. Only repeatedly writing, and finishing, story after story can save someone from being a bad writer. That said, all writers (all humans, really) should read equal parts fiction and non-fiction. Fiction shows you how to write. As for specific titles, read whatever ...


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Well, I couldn't think of a book, but here is a pretty good web-page: http://www.writersworkshop.co.uk/PointsofViewinFiction.html I'm not the most experienced of writers, of course, but from my limited understanding I would say that POVs are a rather simple concept to grasp. The hard part is choosing which one you prefer to use in your writing style or in ...


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What I do is usually just sit down and write without thinking, then edit it later. I have a basic idea of a story, but it usually just happens as I go along.


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If you're recommending her, it must be that you are certain that she's a good fit. This means you need to understand where she's going to fit, and why. Using buzzwords and superlatives is too easy. It only makes a promise. Why would they believe a person who has a thesaurus? What specific experiences that you had with her make you so confident that you're ...


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If you're looking for a book on writing comics and graphic novels, this is the one to get: The Working Writer's Guide to Comics and Graphic Novels



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