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7

For color-to-name converter, a quick Google search gives me this link: http://chir.ag/projects/name-that-color/#C0C0C0 In which you can just pick a color from the color wheel to see its name. Perhaps the color you want is "Mercury" But, as Phillipp said, you might better explain the color in words more frequently used, instead of using some rather ...


4

The difference between a successful writer and a wannabe writer is that the latter says that "unfortunately I don't know anyone in the field," whereas the successful writer grabs a copy of the yellow pages, finds a doctor, and makes an appointment. A further difference is that the wannabe writer uses Google to find information, and that the successful ...


4

Seek medical advice. Find a medical or health care professional who will answer your questions. If you can't figure it out from a book, find a doctor, nurse, EMT, etc. who is willing to sit down with you for half an hour.


3

There are definitely some great resources out there. If you're into creative nonfiction, I would check out: Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writer's Guide from the Neiman Foundation at Harvard University by Mark Kramer. It's essentially a collection of essays from various nonfiction contributors that contains a lot of great advice that can help you ...


3

In my experience, as a general rule-of-thumb, if you look at the number of reviews a book has on Amazon and multiply by 100, you'll be in the ballpark of their sales on Amazon. Some books might be double or quadruple this, and others might be half or less, but it gives you a general idea of whether you're talking about a book that sold 1,000 copies, 10,000 ...


3

I have found character sheets for online roleplayers in MMOs to be very helpful for fleshing out characters; after all, the main thing that their writing is based off of is their character and the world. Obviously some points have been added to the character sheets to accomodate the peculiarities of the fantasy/game world, but they're easy enough to ...


3

When used sparingly or in the right context, archaic language can be fun. I won't argue any literary position, but to answer the OP's question about services or rules, incase anyone (or a future visitor) is curious, this is what I found. Here are a few automated services : http://whilstr.org/ http://www.oldenglishtranslator.co.uk ...


3

I love the apps linked in the other answers, but I see a basic problem with this whole question. Let's try an experiment. Choose three color names that for you describe a very specific color. Now give these names to a few people and ask them to select all the colors that would fit that color term from this color chart: http://www.pantone-colours.com/ How ...


2

Here are two sites that you might want to check out: http://kodisha.net/color-names/?color=FF91A4 http://www.colorhexa.com/ff91a4


2

I would suggest: Creating Unforgettable Characters by Linda Seger. This is actually listed as recommended reading for applicants to ABC network's writing fellowship. 45 Master Characters and A Writer's Guide to Characterization by Victoria Schmidt. Reviews for these can come off mixed, but I like how Schmidt uses the hero's journey and mythological ...


2

I would recommend you to describe the hair of that character as "white" or "grey". Maybe "silver" when you want to be a bit more lyrical, but that's the furthest I would go into detail about the haircolor. The artist of that image likely decided to put a tiny bit of yellow into the color-shade, because pure shades of grey generally look boring and sterile ...


2

A good visual dictionary has appealing illustrations that clearly communicate the intended meaning. Good illustrations are what sell a visual dictionaly (or attract web site visitors), and quality usually has its price, because most frequently it is caused by a lengthy and expensive education as an illustrator or photographer. There are sites such as ...


2

There are two parts involved in writing - the creative bit, when you're doing it, and then the editing afterwards. If the editing part of your brain is around when you're being creative, then you'll never finish anything, because your internal editor will keep telling you that it's not good enough. And if you've ever taught, you'll know that the best way ...


1

This site, written from the poet-author's POV is pretty good: http://www.writersdigest.com/whats-new/getting-a-poetry-collection-published-from-submission-to-the-next-project (Note that this page is just the link page to the content.) This site is targeted more at people using their service, but it has some good practical advice: ...


1

That kind reference work is called a thesaurus. It's similar to a dictionary of synonyms, but the words grouped together do not mean exactly the same - they just have related meanings by similitude or context. To get words only from a specific domain, you can find a thematic thesaurus that is specialized for words relevant to it. Using your example, here is ...


1

William Zinsser’s “On Writing Well” is the one I would suggest. (I am not an English native.) It provides sections on how to write about people, places, sports, business, the arts, and yourself. One can find many tips and instructions on how to turn an average prose – even in the form of email, personal letter, office notes etc - into a tight, clean and ...


1

For American English, Strunk & White or Garner's MAU. For British English, Fowler (updated edition) or style guides from the Guardian, Economist or BBC. Source: http://xkcd.com/923/ (image licensed CC BY-NC 2.5) See also: 'Style guide' @ Wikipedia (scroll down for a big list)


1

Why not just put a blindfold on and walk around your house for a few hours? Take notes into a recorder or a voice note app about what you're feeling, thinking, smelling, hearing, about whether other senses have sharpened, if you're slowing down, etc. Additionally, the children's book Follow My Leader is quite good about showing how a previously sighted boy ...


1

Looking back at my own writing, my recommendation is: You'll have to find out yourself. There are two main directions writing can take, often called "outline" and "no outline". The no outline approach means that you sit down with the seed of an idea (a scene, a character, a first sentence) and just start writing, letting yourself be surprised by where the ...


1

http://www.rhymedesk.com is quite good. It has more extensive list of near rhymes than on other sites. Also you can conveniently write your texts and search for words on the same page.



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