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3

Retype (or use OCR) if the meaning of text is the important thing. You have your formatting rules, your publication may need to be formatted, maybe made readable for mobile devices or devices for handicapped people. If the manuscript is in graphical form, e.g. illustration with descriptions of its parts or some very special formatting, e.g. alchemical ...


1

There are several good approaches to this problem: Cite the actual author. This works if the story is set in a world that is descended from the world of the actual author, and if it is plausible that the provenance of the quote would have been passed down until the time of the story. Cite the actual author, but only give the author's initials. This can ...


0

Sorry, but a summary of the others' answers is: You don't. You may cite your source, but it's up to your readers to know you're quoting, although the best way to make them realize he/she is quoting certain literature or media is to develop him/her to seem the kind of person who would quote it.


1

In real life, you will not know if what someone says is a quote from a book or his own words, if you don't know the text that person is quoting from. For example, if you are familiar with the Terminator movies and someone says "hasta la vista, baby," you might realize that they are quoting Arnold Schwarzenegger, but if you have never seen those movies you ...


5

There are two issues here: legal and literary. Legally, if the quote has fallen into public domain, there's no problem. If not, you're into the whole nebulous area of "fair use". Someone could conceivably sue you for copyright violation for stealing his quote. As we're presumably talking about quotes that are a sentence or two and not dozens of pages, I ...


1

You could, but it is very disrespectful towards the one you steal the quote from. When the person is still alive or not dead for long, it might also be considered plagiarism to use something they said without an attribution. But Friedrich Nietzsche is dead for 115 years now, so in this case it is very unlikely to get you into copyright trouble.


1

I know that John Green uses a real life quote in his book, Looking for Alaska and does not sight the quote in the text so, I'd say it is perfectly fine to have a fictional charter say a real life quote.


0

Agree with "cut the Gordian knot" answers recommending you change your lead-in to the quote so you don't have to change the quote. The problem with that solution is that you can't always do it. So we're back to your original question. If this is a scholarly essay/paper for a class/journal, then AFAIK you should use [], regardless of how ugly or ...


1

In this example, just move the word in question outside the quotation marks: It is possible for God to desire "all people to be saved." It's more difficult in the case that the word in question is buried in the quote. In that case, you would probably just put the entire word itself in brackets.



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