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20

Please, don't. I have often encountered this in Fantasy and Science Fiction, and it breaks my make-believe. I am immediately thrown out of my beautiful escapist reverie and back on my sofa. I hate when authors do that. I expect a fiction to be consistent, and the narrator has to be part of the fiction if this is to work. The only setup where a quote like ...


10

I like the italics. No justification of that, just - a vote. It seems clearest to me.


9

In these days of googling, it's sloppy to not find the source of a quotation. That said, there are quotes that have unclear origins, and for those, I guess you have some wiggle room. I think the "as someone once said," formulation is less than ideal because it feels casual and suggests that you just haven't bothered to investigate the origins of the ...


9

No, it would not be appropriate. It's quite possible that nobody would check you up on this, but quote attributions are expected to be, you know, correct. Mis-attributing a quote might be an honest error, but it's more likely to be a case of insufficient research, or even intentionally lending weight to your work by leaning on an existing respected ...


9

Roughly speaking, it means if you have to pay alimony, you have to earn money. Writing is not a way to earn money (for most of us). He's suggesting that it's insufficient income for an alimony payment, so a writer would have to take on some other work to earn enough money to make the payment, thus cutting into writing time. Of course, you do have to suffer ...


7

Quotes from real people and books are generally considered fair use so they can be used without paying anyone. Song lyrics and poems are a gray area. Some people will tell you you can use portions of song lyrics - a line or two - but others will say you can't use any without permission. If you're not using the whole song, you'd probably be able to get ...


6

As someone who is opposed to using punctuation in non-standard ways to emphasize quotes and who prefers using words to explain what's going on, I say you should skip the italics. Let the story clearly indicate that what the reader is reading is written communication. Breathing heavily she plunked leaned over her desk and grabbed a pen from the wicker ...


6

Personally, and without any reference to support it, I've always believed the quote meant that those dedicated to a writing career often cannot also effectively support a long-term, committed relationship. Which leads to divorce. And alimony. Hence the curse. And Kris' reference from TJ Smith citing Mailer's six wives seems to confirm he suffered from it.


6

You could use empty brackets with a space between them. Brackets are generally used to alter a quote inline, such as fixing grammar or to add information like a name so the quoted material will work within the context of the piece quoting it. "desire[ ] all people to be saved" or don't quote that word: It is possible for God to want "all people to ...


6

For your "Houston" example, definitely not if Apollo 13 is not culturally relevant to the person saying it. You can use some sayings from this universe in your universe, for example Keep your friends close and your enemies closer. Because this could come about without someone having seen The Godfather Part II. It's just advice. But any quote or ...


5

CMOS says periods and commas go inside. It doesn't make sense, to me, but that's the rule. Bear in mind that this does not apply to question or exclamation marks, which only go inside the quotation marks if they belong to the words being quoted. There's a fairly interesting discussion on this, here.


5

There are two issues here: legal and literary. Legally, if the quote has fallen into public domain, there's no problem. If not, you're into the whole nebulous area of "fair use". Someone could conceivably sue you for copyright violation for stealing his quote. As we're presumably talking about quotes that are a sentence or two and not dozens of pages, I ...


5

The answer will depend on the laws of your country. In general, the rights of the sender for privacy etc. have to be weighed against the public's need to know. Private communication is private and in most cases must not be published, because otherwise the personality rights of the sender are being violated. But if that letter contains information that ...


4

The easy part: According to MLA Handbook, you cite a movie as: title underlined (we often use italics instead of underlining), director, distributor, and year released. You may mention writers, actors, and/or producer. Example: It's a Wonderful Life. Dir. Frank Capra. Perf. James Stewart, Donna Reed. RKO, 1946. For a TV series, they say title of the ...


4

Knowing nothing about APA formatting, I would say that the material in quotes should stay quoted — use "our," since it's a direct quote which you immediately cite. I don't see a reason to change the actual quote, and your summary in the previous sentence uses "their" correctly in context. There are contexts where you'd change our to [their] with the ...


4

I agree with Kate Sherwood, you should be able to attribute most quotes these days by simple fact checking. I also like her suggestions for introducing the text, but you can also consider other, formal methods of citation and attribution. In those cases where it's ambiguous as to who said it (for example, there's disagreement or debate over the true ...


4

Avoiding the problem (as per Lauren Ipsum's answer) is probably the best way to deal with this. But let's assume you don't want to change anything about your paragraphs. The answer is unambiguous: no close quotation mark. For two reasons. First reason is simple correctness: you don't want Fowler to turn in his grave. The more important reason is clarity. ...


4

I'm hoping those weren't restaurant reviews! Also, IMHO, your phrase is a nod to Tolkien, a literary allusion. That is not plagiarism, any more than it would be plagiarism to say at the end of a review of a robotics show, "Next year, for sure, I'll be back."


4

Retype (or use OCR) if the meaning of text is the important thing. You have your formatting rules, your publication may need to be formatted, maybe made readable for mobile devices or devices for handicapped people. If the manuscript is in graphical form, e.g. illustration with descriptions of its parts or some very special formatting, e.g. alchemical ...


4

If the quote is in reference to something that would not exist at all in the world you've created, it is completely inappropriate. Even if it happens to be a quote that would make contextual sense (no references to anything in our world), I would still avoid it. References to things that happen in our world, in a world that is not ours, only serve to ...


4

I've actually seen this used deliberately, to help establish the character of the... err... character in question. In the first chapter of The Tales of Paul Twister, we're introduced to Paul, a thief-for-hire in a magical world who's got a bit of a sour, snarky attitude about the world around him in general and his line of work in particular. He's been ...


3

You have broken and punctuated it correctly. But if you're worried about the she continued, then change it up a little: "Well," Antimony began, taking a deep, thoughtful breath, and stepping a little closer. "If you fill the 5 pound sack, and then empty it into a 3 pound sack, you'll have 2 pounds left over. Then you can empty the 3 pound sack back ...


3

Song lyrics and poetry can be a problem. In fiction publishing, most houses will require you to get permission to quote even as little as a single line from a copyrighted popular song or from a well-known poem that's still in copyright, because many copyright owners are extremely litigious and the legal precedents on whether a single line is "fair use" are ...


3

If it effectively summarizes/reflects/prefaces the theme and import of your own paper, then yes.


3

This is certainly valid in some contexts, e.g., in a parody, or while leaning on the fourth wall, for example ... "And using this device you can communicate if there are any issues." explained Houston. "Oh, great, but what if I have to fix it first, «Houston, we've had a problem?»" However, I would advise you against using it if you are not ...


2

I'd write it as: "With all these new personalities floating around, it's a shame we can't find one for you." — Holodoc to Tuvok, "Infinite Regress," Star Trek: Voyager I'd find it weird to have the character name in quotes. They look like scare quotes or "this is fake" quotes. You italicize the name of the show, and the put the episode name in ...


2

A minimalistic approach is to place the character's name in quotes: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur... – “John Sheridan”, Babylon 5 A more-proper method is to mention the character-name in quotes, the work (or series and episode), and the author. Here is an example from a literary quotation ethics webpage: “We are all brothers under the ...


2

Try something like this: This quote is often attributed to Carl Sagan, but I can find little evidence to support that attribution. Regardless, I think this quote is important because...


2

In academic writing, following style guides is particularly important for citations and notes. Are you editing to APA style or another style guide? I'd absolutely check that first and do as the style guide instructs. Your department may also have a style guide for you to follow. (I don't have a copy of APA or I'd check.) Barring any such guidance: If ...


2

I upvoted Greg's answer, because that is what I would do, if for some reason I could not ask the relevant authorities. Your first step should be to get a copy of the thesis formatting guide or manual of your institution. Most universities have one. Your second step, if this guide does not answer your question, should be to ask the examination authority of ...



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