New answers tagged

0

Yes, use a comma after an introductory phrase. Walking down the stairs, she sighed. But Walking down the stairs was her main form of exercise. The second example is trickier, because the introductory phrase is more complex. When he told her she had missed a form, she sighed. But the main part of the sentence is still "she sighed"—the ...


1

In this case, you use a comma to prevent the sentence from being misread. The sentence reads easier with the comma there than without it, so I believe you're two sentences are correct. However, there is an easier way to write them that would increase their clarity. Instead of putting a phrase before the subject and the verb, put the subject and verb first, ...


3

It depends on what you're doing with the text. In some cases, a double hyphen with surrounding spaces will be automatically converted to a dash, but that might not work with a triple hyphen. If you must enter text in typewriter style, I'd suggest using space and a double-hyphen for a dash. It is much clearer, however, to use the correct characters, and ...


1

A double dash would be most correct. In fact some word processors will automatically change a double dash into an em dash.


3

Use a double. Before I went to writing camp, I never even knew of the different types of dashes. But when I was there, I learned to use a double dash for em dashes. Congrats on knowing this type of stuff! Because not everyone knows... Good luck!



Top 50 recent answers are included