Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

If you're looking for stories that you can safely publish online, there are a few good resources for you. @Vivek is right that you definitely cannot publish works to which someone else holds the copyright. It's always safer to try and find a reliable source where those works are already published and simply link to them. That way, if it turns out there are ...


4

You cannot post any material for which you do not have copyright. But, you can provide links to those materials from your blog. If you really need to publish, then better ask for a written permission from the original author or the person who holds the copyright. Just because something is available in multiple places on internet does not imply that ...


2

I agree with what the commenters have already said (and think some of them should be turned into answers), so assume this is building upon their replies. As they said, you usually only have one ISBN per book, only changing ISBNs if something substantial changes about the book. If the publisher changes, if the size changes, or if it changes from hardcover to ...


1

Most publishers use InDesign for the text block and Photoshop for the cover, and there are a variety of these files stored on the relevant staff members' computers. The closest you get to the "master copy" would be the most recent version of the work provided by the writer that has been through the editing process and contains the most up-to-date edits ...


1

Despite being flooded with manuscripts, agents and publishers are constantly on the lookout for new talent. German SF writer Andreas Eschbach writes on his website that he once had the chance to look at the one and a half metre pile that constituted the last two weeks of submitted manuscripts beside the desk of an editor. Unsure of the competitive quality ...


0

Is there none that can supply some "trade" information regarding the methods, file formats etc - of modern books / manuscripts? I expect, if the graphics was ever available as such - or designed so by the publisher - they would be stored as vector graphics, unrendered or uncompressed original formats. Complex images though, aren't impossible to do by vector ...


6

Your contract should spell out what, if any, rights you have to use the cover art and/or book excerpts for promotional purposes. Typically, smaller or independent presses will be more than happy to add in those rights during negotiation since they will typically have a much smaller budget for promotion and will rely on the author to do much of the ...


2

Typically, "no". Not unless there's a contract or license that allows it. The cover was commissioned and paid for by the publisher. However, non-deceptive use for the purpose of selling more books would probably be happily approved by the publisher.


4

For some writers, ONLY their first book was popular. (Some only write one book. Success can be as crippling as failure.) Here's a list: http://www.goodreads.com/list/show/5477.Authors_With_Only_One_Whole_Novel Although that list isn't counting plays and short stories, which is certainly unfair, I find it telling how many famous writers only wrote one ...


5

J.K. Rowling's debut novel was Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone. It was pretty successful.


3

of course debuts can do well if they're good. Some of it will also depend on marketing and genre, but there's nothing stopping a first novel from being a smash.


4

You can publish them yourself. If you do that, you retain all of the rights to the stories and the book. That way, nobody can get the rights to the book and throw them away. To publish an ebook, you can make an epub file and distribute it through Kindle, Apple iBooks, Kobo, Nook, Smashwords, and other places. They won't steal it. They want to sell it for ...



Top 50 recent answers are included