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As I am not in mexico, I will look at this from a slightly more abstract position. First to note In my hometown I only know of one publisher, but my dad retired from that after publishing only one book. Chances are that you will not find a publisher in your home town. Most of the ones I know of are based in New York. Let's try another question, what are ...


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Do as the agency says. If they wanted you to target a specific agent, they would say so. If they forgot to state this, they are not an agency you want to work with anyway. Think of an agency's submission guidelines as a writer's version of a university admission test. If you cannot follow simple rules, how can they rely on you being able to work with them? ...


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Those are basically two of the most common options, yes. Below are the ones that I know: Fee: This is typical for articles, short stories and poems submitted to magazines (when there is payment offered). You get either a one-time flat fee or a per-word fee for first publication rights in that periodical. Contract Writing: This is typical for large ...


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What kind of book? I have most experience with novels... I think things are a bit different for non-fiction, but I can't say for sure. For novels... Authors don't get paid per word. That applies to some short story markets, and, I think to non-fiction articles, but not novels. For novels, authors are paid royalties based on sales. This can be either net ...


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AFAIK, people usually don't get paid for that sort of thing. It's like a letter to the editor. The reward is getting your story/poem/essay in the paper. The small amount of money that somebody would get paid for a one-time short submission isn't worth the newspaper's bother. But, if it's a weekly contest, then the newspaper might want to increase ...


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Unlike Chris Sunami, I suspect that this task was not given to help the agent or publisher better sell the book. They are professionals and (should) know their field. If they don't, you have chosen the wrong publisher. I rather believe that these professionals want to see if their prospective new author is a professional, too, and knows the context in which ...


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The point of this is to help the person judging the proposal know how to position and sell your book. If there are other books in the same general space, it shows that there is a pre-existing market. This may be harder to demonstrate for a book that is well and truly unique --unfortunately in today's marketplace, no one wants to be a pioneer. On the other ...


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Most traditional publishers now use POD for their backlists. It's a controversial practice, because some authors and publishers disagree about whether a POD title should be considered "in print" for purposes of determining whether rights revert to the author or not.


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No. As others have stated there is no way you can "protect" from copying. But why would anyone bother? I hate to say this but if you're worried about your work being stolen then you are a newbie because only newbies worry about it. And if you're a newbie the chances are your work probably isn't great (sorry but it's true). And as also stated stealing poetry? ...


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Truthfully, there's absolutely no incentive for a publisher to steal poems. Most imprints that do poetry do it as a labor of love, there's very little money in poetry. For any genre --although many people when first starting out worry about work being stolen, I've never heard of it actually happening. The only time I would worry is if I was sending to a ...


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Send your work in the format which is preferred by the publisher. There is no technical method to protect your work against unauthorized copying. When they can read it, they can transcribe it. But you don't need any protection like that, because your work is automatically protected against unauthorized publication by international copyright laws. When ...


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That's a tough one to give a foolproof answer to. However, if I had to give my best possible idea of how one might accomplish this I would suggest checking out the options in Excel. Not sure if that's the answer to your question but it's what I would try. Good luck.



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