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Your font doesn't matter. Publishing industry standard is 250 words per page. From the Editorial Freelancers Association: The industry standard for a manuscript page, however, is a firm 250 words. This Google Answers thread has some other citations (almost all of which are 404 links, sadly), but I think Google Answers is like Stack Exchange, so take ...


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Apart from a book being re-published by different publishers, a book can also be published by two or more co-publishers. Here is an example, showing different citation styles: APA Martínez, F. G., & Tigchelaar, E. J. C. (Eds.). (1997-1998). The dead sea scrolls: Study edition (Vols. 1-2). Leiden: Brill. MLA Martínez, F. G., and Eibert J. C. ...


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It's okay to publish a book at any age. If it is a good book (or at least "good enough.) Worse come to worse, if you can't publish at age 13, you can try again at age 18 or age 23. A famous writer, Pearl S. Buck published her first book at age 10, I believe.


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Well, this has a lot of answers, so i'll keep it simple. Most people don't publish their first book, regardless of age. You could be forty, writing a book, and still wouldn't be able to publish it. If it's a good book, obviously you can get it published, no big deal. It's actually pretty impressive. But good writing comes with practice, not with age. Write ...


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Nancy Yi Fan started writing her first book at age seven. At 10, she got it published. It was called, "Sword Bird". I never read it myself, but it got good reviews and was fairly popular. Now she has two more Sword Books published. Three books published before you're twenty is a pretty sweet accomplishment.


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"Romance" vs. "fantasy" are significantly different genres. You can absolutely have romance in a fantasy and fantasy in a romance, and you can absolutely write a romantic story in a fantasy setting without the book being a "romance." The differences are in the plot and characters. While I'm not familiar with the subgenre of YA Romance vs. adult Romance, a "...


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Genre is a marketing tool. Publishers are marketers of books. That is why you seek out a publisher rather than publishing yourself -- because you want the services of someone who knows how to market books. So if a publisher says your book is in a particular genre, chances are they are right.


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I am not a lawyer but here's my "take." The writer will get sued for doing the actual infringing. The publisher will also get sued, for aiding and abetting, and because it has the deeper pockets. The publisher may have a defense if it took steps to prevent infringement such as questioning the author about the antecedents of his work, and/or doing a ...


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There are two possibilities that I can see: The book is republished. Either of both publications can be part of a series or a standalone. Many classics fall into this category. The book is co-published by different publishers in different countries. Here is an example. This typically happens with scientific handbooks or textbooks. Sometimes these are part ...


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My rule of thumb: Publish when the paperback is thick enough to put a readable title on the spine. I use CreateSpace for my paperbacks. For CreateSpace, you need a minimum of 110 pages to put text on the spine. That gives 1/8" of room for the title. That's maybe an 11 or 12 point font (assuming all caps or small caps with no descenders), which is pretty ...


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The best approach is to query the agent first and ask them what their preference is. It is unlikely that they all have the same policy. Asking them first shows them that you are aware of the issue and willing to adjust if required. That shows professionalism, which counts for a lot with agents.



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