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To find out what publishers are looking for it is best to visit the Submission Guidelines on their website, or visit www.writersmarket.com. There is a list of magazines, book publishers, literary agents, ect. and all state what they are looking for. For those that are looking for poetry, they will tell you what form of poetry they are looking for. You can ...


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Typically, it's difficult to publish in one country using the language of another. Even in the U.S., where there is an ever-growing increase in Spanish-speaking persons, it's difficult to find a publisher for Spanish language books. If you live in Mexico, reach out to U.S. (or even Canadian) publishing houses with your manuscript. You're more likely to ...


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The general trend in poetry over the last hundred years has clearly been towards the increasing dominance of free verse. However, I don't see any point in trend-chasing when it comes to poetry. Most poems that make it into print are either in self-published chapbooks, or from tiny boutique presses that publish for the love of poetry, not for profit. Given ...


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I would talk to them about it. Just be friendly. Let them know that the wrong file was edited. See what they have to say. Were both files sent in the same email / however you sent it? If it wasn't clear which was to be edited, that may be on you. If you were very clear about which was to be edited, they might offer to look at it again. Could just be a simple ...


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As I am not in mexico, I will look at this from a slightly more abstract position. First to note In my hometown I only know of one publisher, but my dad retired from that after publishing only one book. Chances are that you will not find a publisher in your home town. Most of the ones I know of are based in New York. Let's try another question, what are ...


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Do as the agency says. If they wanted you to target a specific agent, they would say so. If they forgot to state this, they are not an agency you want to work with anyway. Think of an agency's submission guidelines as a writer's version of a university admission test. If you cannot follow simple rules, how can they rely on you being able to work with them? ...


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Those are basically two of the most common options, yes. Below are the ones that I know: Fee: This is typical for articles, short stories and poems submitted to magazines (when there is payment offered). You get either a one-time flat fee or a per-word fee for first publication rights in that periodical. Contract Writing: This is typical for large ...


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What kind of book? I have most experience with novels... I think things are a bit different for non-fiction, but I can't say for sure. For novels... Authors don't get paid per word. That applies to some short story markets, and, I think to non-fiction articles, but not novels. For novels, authors are paid royalties based on sales. This can be either net ...


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AFAIK, people usually don't get paid for that sort of thing. It's like a letter to the editor. The reward is getting your story/poem/essay in the paper. The small amount of money that somebody would get paid for a one-time short submission isn't worth the newspaper's bother. But, if it's a weekly contest, then the newspaper might want to increase ...


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Unlike Chris Sunami, I suspect that this task was not given to help the agent or publisher better sell the book. They are professionals and (should) know their field. If they don't, you have chosen the wrong publisher. I rather believe that these professionals want to see if their prospective new author is a professional, too, and knows the context in which ...



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