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1

I am a young writer too! :) I've been creating a series with my best friend we are both young and I we found an author that have invested in us and has taken the time to really get to know us <3 What I've learned so far is to not fall down when people think your too young ;) one of my favorite Bible verses is: "Don't let anyone look down on you because ...


0

It's better to use D2D as they won't charge you anything, so in case you just want to distribute your books and/or won't to upload them for free - D2D it's much, much better than Smashwords.


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One of the first things you should consider is whether or not you are going to have to pay anything to this local printer in order to get your book "published". If so, then you may want to consider a different approach. Just being able to get your book printed doesn't guarantee that it is going to get sold to anyone, especially book stores or libraries, ...


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Technically, you shouldn't need to purchase an ISBN at all, unless you are planning to publish the book yourself, including the printing. If the only reason you are even considering it is in the hopes of protecting your title, then an ISBN won't even do that for you. In that instance, the only benefit of an ISBN would be in helping libraries or other sources ...


1

If the novel is good enough to get published, it won't matter how old you are. You'll just be that much cooler. I've been trying to get published since 12, like you—well actually 11—and I'm 17 now, still sans dice, as they say. I hope you have more luck. Don't ever give up. And maybe brush up on your homonyms ("too" vs "to"—though that's minutiae).


1

Yes, you can write a book even though you're young. No, there is no guarantee that it will become widely read, or that it will sell a lot of copies. There are two ways to learn something: 1) Learn from someone who has done it before (and achieved the result you want to have). Usually you end of with similar results to your mentor. 2) Do it ...


2

Yes, it's perhaps borderline possible to publish, but keep in mind that your market will become tangible if it includes people who are intrigued by foreign cultures and interaction between them, but not specifically multilingual, or perhaps multilingual but not necessarily in your specific languages. People are rarely as multilingual as their region. ...


1

I thought I would throw my two cents into the mix. I wrote my first book(non-fiction) when I was about 16-17 (I am 20 now.) and decided to self-publish it with the help of a few friends and family members. Short answer: Yes. You can publish your book. Long answer: Take your first book as the biggest experience of your writing career. It's unlikely that ...


1

There are many books out there that have become best-sellers because their authors were young! Early genius as well as an "authentic voice" (instead of having adults speak for the young) are two of the strongest selling arguments in the media today. If your book is as well written as that of an adult author, yours will be the one the publisher buys. But it ...


8

Don't discount yourself because you're young. That's great that you're starting off so early. Keep at it! Though I don't believe anyone will have a problem with it, there are different scenarios depending on how you want to be published (self-pub vs traditional pub). For traditional, no one is going to ask your age when you're submitting queries, so if ...


25

There are no age restrictions on publishing - you may need to get someone else to sign contracts for you, but that's a minor detail. That said, it's pretty hard to get a book published, even for adults who've been working at writing for a long time. It's probably best if you focus on writing because it's fun, and give yourself a chance to explore without ...


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You HAVE to get an ISBN before you publish. The ISBN is printed on the cover of the book. The printer has to know what it is before they can print copies. The only question is HOW LONG before you publish. In practice, you probably will spend at least a few weeks, and maybe months, getting the layout and cover design nailed down, reviewing proof copies and ...


4

The fiction you buy yourself is probably the most reliable way to discover who's publishing fiction. All that fine print on the first couple pages of most books? It's actually pretty useful information! And by going on to actually read the story, you'll get a good idea of at least one type of story they've bought in the past. For digital versions, you may ...


2

Here are some resources for finding publishers, magazines, and other fiction markets: Writer's Market book or web site Duotrope.com Ralan.com (see the "markets" links near the top of the page)


2

Check out Author Earnings. There are lots of debates about the collection, meaning, and significance of the data, but there's plenty of data.


2

It's very difficult to have hard answers for questions like this because there are way too many variables. "Traditional" publishing is not a monolith - there's a lot of difference between publishing with the Big 5 and publishing with a small e-publisher, and a lot of difference between publishing with a reputable, established e-publisher and a fly-by-night ...


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This Anwer was originally part of "I am an unestablished author with a decent book. Should I publish online, or try to find a 'real' publisher?", then was asked as a Q and was shut down till re- editing it as a Q and A. These following numbers are broadly inaccurate; they are here to get a general idea. Some SE members strongly disagree of ...


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If you have a printer who is handling print-on-demand, what would you need an additional service for? Lay out the book yourself, or hire a designer to do it, and send the end files to your POD printer. To declare yourself the publisher you just put it in your colophon information: Published by Final Frontier Enterprises Excelsior, CO 74656 You ...


2

If you've already got a printer for the book, and a distribution plan, what else are you looking for? Do you know how to format an e-book? It's a bit finicky, but not that difficult - I really like Guido Henkels' guide (http://guidohenkel.com/2010/12/take-pride-in-your-ebook-formatting/) but it gives you way more information than you need, really. You can ...


5

I agree with most of the points made in other answers here. But I would add this, having come from a conference where numerous, published authors shared their thoughts on this question. First, you need to examine one big assumption: "If I have a decent product..." I won't say you don't, however, it was pointed out, human nature being what it is: 1) ...



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