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1

Since permissions let you use a quote for publishing, the permission needs to be granted before the book actually goes to market. That being said, the process you go through with an agent happens before the publishing process, so I think it's fine for you to have some "pending" permissions, as long as you're clear with your agent/editor about which ones are ...


4

Publishers are always looking for a reason to reject submissions, because it is easy to reject (takes a few seconds), and much more work to accept. I was once on an elevator with an editor and the elevator got stuck. The editor got out his phone and said "I can use this time to reject some submissions." The trick is to know the editor and what they usually ...


3

Every author and book is different. I've sold about 50,000 books in 3 years, so I'm a solid mid-list author. I use my blog, Facebook, and Twitter the most. Facebook is where I tend to get the most intimate engagement. I'll throw out plot questions or title brainstorming for my work-in-progress, and fans and friends and family will chime in with ideas. Lots ...


2

Wattpad is a really good place to start. Almost everyone there is an aspiring writer and hence encourage other writers immensely. You can update status and post messages to your audience. There are many clubs within Wattpad to promote your works. https://www.wattpad.com


2

GOOGLE+. If you're targeting a specific niche I recommend Goodreads, just go to the forums of the authors/genre that inspired you and post your work there. Same for Facebook and Google+ (post on their respective pages/communities).


6

The examples of Paolini and Rowling are not useful as blueprint for a different reason than that stated in the comments: they are exceptions. Overwhelming success is rare, not the rule. It happens to a small percentage of published works only, and you cannot plan it. What you can plan, though, is a more moderate, general success. And this depends largely on ...


12

Really simple answer is this: Write one book. Tie up all the loose ends. Make it one complete story. But imagine it as book one of a series. Don't let we the reader know that -- it should be undetectable to us, but you will know there's potential for a series. When sending to agents and publishers ensure you include the golden words: "Stand-alone novel ...


3

Yes, it constitutes a lie, technically speaking. Yes, it is legal. The use of pseudonyms is an established practice in publishing. There's a wide range of reasons where writing under a pseudonym might be obviously beneficial to the author: The author's real name is similar to the name of a more-popular author; readers might confuse the two. The author is ...


1

Note: I am not a lawyer In Czech, we have saying: "When there is no lawsuit, there is no damage" In other words. Someone lied to you. So what? What can you accuse them from? What is the damage caused to you? The question is not about legality but more over about morality because the only damage caused can be, that you are not going to buy a book ...


7

The public image of public figures is largely made up or manipulated. Politicians hold doctorate degrees by questionable foreign universities or are being convicted of plagiarism. Degrees signify expertise to the voters, but take time and effort. George Clooney and other stars supposedly pay young women to play their spouses for some time so as to appear ...


2

"This book is a work of fiction..."



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