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IANAL, but ... You say you have no written contract. Do you have any correspondence? Letters, emails, etc? Anything in writing to say who agreed to what? If not, if all you have is a verbal agreement, then legally that is still a binding contract. But the problem with verbal contracts is that there's no way to prove what was agreed to, and the parties may ...


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I am writing as a published author. The "standard" contract term is the so-called "next work" right. That is, the author needs to offer the publisher the rights to the "next work" s/he produces. If the two parties, bargaining under good faith, can come to an accord on the work, the "next work" clause applies to the following product. If there is no ...


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You do have a verbal contract. You have an agreement that your publisher would publish your work and that you would get royalties. That is a contract. The fact that there are no further details is irrelevant to the question wether or not you have a contract. In many jurisdictions, a verbal contract is as good as a written one. In fact, historically the ...


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There are two issues, the copyright registration, and the contract. First Make sure the copyright is registered to you. Right away, before you finish reading the answer. Now! The second is the contract, if verbal is still there. In writing notify your publisher that you are terminating all rights to future publication of your works and that you are ...



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