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5

Yes, you can ask for feedback at any and all of those stages. The feedback which is helpful at any stage is "This works and here's why" and "This doesn't work and here's why." The "here's why" is the MOST IMPORTANT part of feedback. If your reader can only say "I don't like this," it's a waste of everyone's time. Proofreading should be done at later ...


3

According to Hart's Rules, Section 3.2 Paragraphs has the relevant info: New paragraphs following headings should be ranged full left. New paragraphs not following a heading should be indented one tab. Leave the first line of the story alone, but the dialogue and the paragraphs following should each have a single tab indentation for the first line. ...


3

Ph simply means phonetic. This means the writer had spelled it how it sounded. It is often used in court.


3

A mark consisting of the letters sp enclosed in an oval is commonly used by teachers (and some professors) in the United States to call a misspelling to the student's attention. But as you note, the standard meaning of that mark under U.S. proofreading conventions is "spell out", and it appears in the margin of the same line where the proofreader or copy ...


3

I thought the obvious answer was this: Have someone else proof your work. No matter how many times I go over my story, a reader will still find stuff I've missed. They'll also find sentences that I read as perfectly sensible, but that they can't parse.


2

With self publishing these days, errors are inevitable. I wouldn't mind too much to 3 or 4 errors as long as the flow is there. Anyway that is me. I am an author as well but even after reading my books over and over many times, it was disappointing to find errors.


2

There isn't a mark that means "misspelling" by itself in "standard" proofreading marking. "sp" with a circle is short for to "spell out", which, like you said, means to expand an abbreviation. Misspellings should be struck out with the deletion mark and the correct spelling should be written above it. Or if it's just a small error, like a single missing ...


2

My husband is also a writer, so I'm constantly bouncing ideas off of him throughout my researching and plotting phases. Usually by the time I'm writing, I don't say much about story changes. But once I start writing, no one looks at my work until I've edited it a few times on my own. Then my hubby sees it, I edit it again, and then I send it out to beta ...


2

If you have a WordPress site, you should be able to create various users who have different levels of permission. Give your two or three trusted friends their own usernames with Admin or Editor permissions, and those people should be able to log in and edit your posts.


2

It is theoretically impossible to proof your own prose. To achieve professional quality copy, no less than two sets of eyes must be applied. Writers can't self-proof with 100 percent fidelity. The presence of the "second set of eyes" may not be available or practical. If my prose MUST be self-proofed, then while COPY is a DRAFT: Create (print) a HARD COPY ...


1

You say you are proof-reading, so you are the copy editor? You should concern yourself with the readability of the text, but not the pagination. In any case, if a novel chapter goes 8 lines into the last page, that is fine.


1

I'm not sure there are many (any?) professional editors or proofreaders still working on paper copy. Every publisher I've worked with has expected a digital file from me, and the edits have been done digitally. That said, the principle is the same - if a word is mis-spelled, the editor just changes it. That would be with "track changes" on, so I can see ...


1

Errors abound in everything from Stephen King novels to The LA Times. Daily newpapers get sort-of a pass from me, because they are on tight deadlines, but still it drives me nuts seeing errors in the 'A' section every time I read it. With books, there should be - more editors more time multiple editions This makes prose, style, spelling, grammatical and ...


1

Adding an idea that seemed to work for me. Write in your usual font (by font I mean "times new roman", " Ariel", etc) Change the format of the whole manuscript to a different font preferably with the following properties: A font you never read in, one that is similar to cursive (handwritten). Also change the line spacing if you need. It seems very ...


1

The best proofreader I ever worked with always read everything twice -- once forward and once backwards. The first reading caught punctuation mistakes as well as obvious errors; the backwards reading made every spelling error or unplanned repetition stand out very clearly.



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