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Middle-grade targeted or not, I think backstory should be exposed gradually. I can remember kids (and not-so-kids) complain about a long piece of text without dialogue. At some age of one's reading career, one realizes that's where many interesting things happen (or else that one doesn't like reading), and then complains about too long descriptions and ...


4

Orson Scott Card has discussed, in several places, how prologues (particularly to fantasy epics) tend to be dull, disembodied history lessons. For example, from an interview: The most common mistakes come in picking where and how to begin their story. Too many people believe that old canard about plunging into the middle of the action: in medias res, the ...


3

You need to start the story with a hook, something to get interest started, the hook can be in the prologue, but seldom is, and once hooked switching on your reader tickes them off. Does the prologue draw people into your narrative? If it does then it is fine, otherwise It should be less than 3/4 page and in a different font so that a bored reader will know ...


1

As I read your question, I couldn't help but think back to the time I first read Harry Potter and the philosopher's stone. I was in grade 2 and I don't remember if there was a prologue or not, however, the introduction to Harry's world felt like a prologue (or it wouldn't have been a problem if it was in this particular book). If your story has an unusual ...


1

I don't know about your prologue, but as a reader I seriously despise prologues that don't feature the protagonists, for two reasons: I read novels, because I am interested what happens to the protagnonists that I identify with and care about. When I alread know what and who the novel is about, I don't care about "what went before" but befell someone else. ...



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