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My experience and the collected anecdotal wisdom of all writing coaches whose books I have read is that it takes you some time to get into the flow (so there is a minimum time you must write each session), you get easier into the writing if you write each day, and – this is your question – that the quality of your writing will deteriorate after some time (so ...


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The best way to revise a manuscript depends on at least three things: firstly, what state the text is in e.g. first draft, rough notes, near publication. Secondly, what type of writer you are e.g. first on paper and then type, only type, organise completely in head before commiting a word to paper. Thirdly, how long do you have e.g. it is due tomorrow, it is ...


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Related question at: 2nd Draft- Fix spelling/grammar or plot first? I would say you should definitely start with the macro-issues, the plot/characterization/structure issues that may lead to you re-writing entire chunks of the story. There's no point polishing writing that you're going to end up deleting. After that? I've never gone through an entire ...


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Where you want to get to is the text to be consistent with itself. Then you want to have a story that works, at least in terms of gripping the reader and creating enough suspension of disbelieve. All the rest is detail, for later rewrites. You had your blast. Main thing done, getting your thoughts on paper end-to-end. Lotta work left. Have fun!


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The comments on your post suggest therapy, and I think it is good advice. This is more than just writer's block or procrastination. It sounds like you have serious anxiety that's triggered by writing. Here are some things you might try if you can't afford a therapist. First, pick a book and copy the text out of it. This will help you get used to the ...


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Gee, I agree with what. You need a specialist. Something that helped me, though (I was a perfectionist, too) is this quote: "Art is never finished, only abandoned." - Leonardo da Vinci Give up perfection. Look at your writing as something that improves incrementally rather than something that is fixed. You can always come back and edit later; something ...


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I don't have any experience with cowriting, so take my advice with a grain of salt. But I have two thoughts: First: If you're relatively new to writing (it sounds like you have yet to write your first novel), then I think there's probably a period of self-discovery and learning ahead of you. If your coauthor says "let's do X", but you don't have the ...



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