Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

This article shows an example breakdown of the costs involved in making a hardcover book: Based on a list price of $27.95 $3.55 - Pre-preduction - This amount covers editors, graphic designers, and the like $2.83 - Printing - Ink, glue, paper, etc $2.00 - Marketing - Book tour, NYT Book Review ad, printing and shipping galleys to journalists ...


13

TL;DR: Pick a lightweight, off-white, acid-free opaque paper (preferably book paper if it’s available). Then pick a binding to suit your budget: 3-ring and a nice binder if you’re cheap, plastic comb if you’re slightly less cheap, perfect binding if you’ve got a couple of bucks or professional bookbinding if money is no object. From just printing it off and ...


7

If you use one Lulu or Infinity Publishing, you'll have self-published your book and lost your first publication rights. Definitely not a plus if you're planning on selling it to a publisher. If you just wanted a couple copies printed, you can go to Kinkos or something like that to have it printed. Most online places I know of are self-publishers, not ...


7

Are there standardized sizes? The mass market paperback appears to be standardized in North America at 4.25" x 6.75". Some of the other economical standard North American sizes: Trade Paperback 5.5" x 8.5" 6.0" x 9.0" Textbook 7.0" x 10.0" Large 8.5" x 11.0" Reference There does seem to be some evidence that a larger mass market ...


6

Since many books are written based on an advance to the author from the publisher, I imagine there's also a component of them trying to regain that advance earlier in the sales cycle.


6

I can't speak to any small companies that might be popping up out there, but I can bring my experience with CreateSpace, which is the Amazon POD service. I recently used CreateSpace to provide a print version of one of my books, and when I received the proof copy to review I was truly quite impressed. I compared it side-by-side with a trade paperback that I ...


5

In the tech book world, I know O'Reilly is moving towards a POD model for many of their books, including a new series that is completely POD. Has to do with the anticipated number of sales, I imagine.


4

If you are willing to do the grunt work, check out Lightning Source (http://www.lightningsource.com/) and/or CreateSpace (http://www.createspace.com/) by Amazon. Lightning Source is one of the cheapest I have found online when I was searching for such a solution about a year ago, and I believe Amazon's CreateSpace actually uses them for their printing ...


3

Most traditional publishers now use POD for their backlists. It's a controversial practice, because some authors and publishers disagree about whether a POD title should be considered "in print" for purposes of determining whether rights revert to the author or not.


3

First of all, you appear to have established the ways in which yours differs from the others. Then, also look at other POD providers - I take it you're also concerned with the matter of print costs, but that's difficult to avoid with a massive tome. POD / CreateSpace may not be the right answer, however appealing it may sound. You could also talk to ...


3

I've used Lulu Press in the past. You can order one book at a time if you want from them. And if you are willing to go ebook, then look at Amazon and Barnes & Noble too. Wikipedia's article on self-publishing is a good general place to start searching.


3

When I was publishing my first book, I found that the best pricing I could find to self-publish a hard-cover book was from Lulu. I wasn't doing a picture book, but if they were good on other types of books, they're probably good on other types of books, too. So here's their pricing page for picture books: http://picture.com/pricing You might also look at ...


3

There is no hard-and-fast size, but it costs publishers more to produce a larger book, and you're going to have to convince an editor that the extra text is worth it. You'll often see an authors books expand in size as they get to be more successful, and more capable of overriding their editors. Sometimes this can be good, but there are notable instances ...


3

You should ask this question to the CreatSpace community. Besides that, you can add your own barcode as the help stated.


3

When my daughter wrote a book, I used http://www.48hrbooks.com/ to print 25 copies. They looked just like books you'd buy in a store. She was thrilled and gave them out to her friends and family. They were fast and professional. And, if you buy a large order their prices are quite competitive. You retain all rights to the book. They have an online ...


3

Yes, some of them use POD for their back-catalogue. Bloomsbury Publishing has launched a digital global publisher, called Bloomsbury Reader, that will sell a back-catalogue of titles in e-book and print-on-demand format. Bloomsbury Reader will sell books that have either never been printed before or haven't been available in print for many years. ...


3

I would imagine because they're bigger, heavier, of higher quality, etc. edit: i stated this because production costs would be higher, the shipping/transportation costs are higher, the storage and shelving cost is higher. also hard backs seem, to me, to last longer.


2

epub (as well as kindle) are subsets of HTML. So, in essence, there's no difference between reading an e-book on a tablet and reading a webpage on a computer -- and you get some of the same problems. Color shifts between different computers has been plaguing web developers since the start. I don't have inDesign, so I can't tell you where to go exactly, but ...


2

You don't need a publishing house for that (and anyway your intended distribution is too low for such companies to be interested). You just want to self-publish your work. When I self-published a book (making, ultimately, about 300 copies), I went to a commercial duplication place that could do production and binding. I was producing a manual, so 8.5x11 ...


2

I'd recommend going to PODW and walking through their instant quote wizard. It will give you an excellent appreciation of the sorts of decisions that you have to make, and an idea of the costs. If you went for some traditional book printer you'd probably get a better price, but the effort of dealing with them would make you wish for an early and painless ...


2

With your first book, you have no idea (honestly...) how it will sell. So, your 500 copies may well take a long time to sell, and in the meantime, you have to keep them in a damp proof storage location, preferably not on metal shelving (winter cold creates damp that way), and other factors apply, too. Nowadays, it's much easier and cheaper to use POD (Print ...


2

Typically when you self-publish, you retain all rights to your manuscript. The printer is just performing a service for you, there is no contract, so you should be able to take everything with you, no questions asked. The only exception would be if --as you seem to indicate --you used an Xlibris template for your cover art, in which case, that would stay ...


2

Xlibris is not a publisher. They do not consider themselves publishers, but publishing services providers. They do not select manuscripts, but offer publishing services for any author who pays them, indepenent of the quality of their work. They do not make money through sales (as a publisher would, who selects marketable manuscripts and rejects those they ...


2

Definitely check out www.createspace.com That is Amazon's selfpublishing hardcopy arm. They have the sizes you are looking for and you can get your printed items done very inexpensively. You can calculate your cost before you ever try the service if you go to: ...


1

PODW http://www.printondemand-worldwide.com/ will give you an instant quote on it through their website, and that walks you through all of the choices you can make.


1

Yes, small-press publishers use print-on-demand. It's hard to do a print run of less than 500 books more economically than print-on-demand, and many new books sell less than that. In fact, by the time you factor in printing, shipping from printer to distributor, cost of warehousing, and shipping to retailer, it's sometimes really hard to do better than ...


1

I know a couple of people who have encountered this problem as well, and the way they addressed it was to convert all their charts to images. They generally had better luck in seeing the colors rendered properly when they did this. However, that introduced another issue in that the screen sizes for different e-readers, from Smartphones to Tablets to ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible