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22

This article shows an example breakdown of the costs involved in making a hardcover book: Based on a list price of $27.95 $3.55 - Pre-preduction - This amount covers editors, graphic designers, and the like $2.83 - Printing - Ink, glue, paper, etc $2.00 - Marketing - Book tour, NYT Book Review ad, printing and shipping galleys to journalists ...


13

TL;DR: Pick a lightweight, off-white, acid-free opaque paper (preferably book paper if it’s available). Then pick a binding to suit your budget: 3-ring and a nice binder if you’re cheap, plastic comb if you’re slightly less cheap, perfect binding if you’ve got a couple of bucks or professional bookbinding if money is no object. From just printing it off and ...


7

If you use one Lulu or Infinity Publishing, you'll have self-published your book and lost your first publication rights. Definitely not a plus if you're planning on selling it to a publisher. If you just wanted a couple copies printed, you can go to Kinkos or something like that to have it printed. Most online places I know of are self-publishers, not ...


6

I can't speak to any small companies that might be popping up out there, but I can bring my experience with CreateSpace, which is the Amazon POD service. I recently used CreateSpace to provide a print version of one of my books, and when I received the proof copy to review I was truly quite impressed. I compared it side-by-side with a trade paperback that I ...


6

Are there standardized sizes? The mass market paperback appears to be standardized in North America at 4.25" x 6.75". Some of the other economical standard North American sizes: Trade Paperback 5.5" x 8.5" 6.0" x 9.0" Textbook 7.0" x 10.0" Large 8.5" x 11.0" Reference There does seem to be some evidence that a larger mass market ...


3

When I was publishing my first book, I found that the best pricing I could find to self-publish a hard-cover book was from Lulu. I wasn't doing a picture book, but if they were good on other types of books, they're probably good on other types of books, too. So here's their pricing page for picture books: http://picture.com/pricing You might also look at ...


3

If you are willing to do the grunt work, check out Lightning Source (http://www.lightningsource.com/) and/or CreateSpace (http://www.createspace.com/) by Amazon. Lightning Source is one of the cheapest I have found online when I was searching for such a solution about a year ago, and I believe Amazon's CreateSpace actually uses them for their printing ...


3

There is no hard-and-fast size, but it costs publishers more to produce a larger book, and you're going to have to convince an editor that the extra text is worth it. You'll often see an authors books expand in size as they get to be more successful, and more capable of overriding their editors. Sometimes this can be good, but there are notable instances ...


3

You should ask this question to the CreatSpace community. Besides that, you can add your own barcode as the help stated.


3

I've used Lulu Press in the past. You can order one book at a time if you want from them. And if you are willing to go ebook, then look at Amazon and Barnes & Noble too. Wikipedia's article on self-publishing is a good general place to start searching.


2

I'd recommend going to PODW and walking through their instant quote wizard. It will give you an excellent appreciation of the sorts of decisions that you have to make, and an idea of the costs. If you went for some traditional book printer you'd probably get a better price, but the effort of dealing with them would make you wish for an early and painless ...


2

When my daughter wrote a book, I used http://www.48hrbooks.com/ to print 25 copies. They looked just like books you'd buy in a store. She was thrilled and gave them out to her friends and family. They were fast and professional. And, if you buy a large order their prices are quite competitive. You retain all rights to the book. They have an online ...


2

epub (as well as kindle) are subsets of HTML. So, in essence, there's no difference between reading an e-book on a tablet and reading a webpage on a computer -- and you get some of the same problems. Color shifts between different computers has been plaguing web developers since the start. I don't have inDesign, so I can't tell you where to go exactly, but ...


1

I know a couple of people who have encountered this problem as well, and the way they addressed it was to convert all their charts to images. They generally had better luck in seeing the colors rendered properly when they did this. However, that introduced another issue in that the screen sizes for different e-readers, from Smartphones to Tablets to ...


1

They certainly don't do it traditionally, but Random House recently got some press for launching a POD service, so maybe it's on the way. They do say that it's more of a service for consumers than an expected money-maker. Publishers may also use POD for production purposes (ARCs, etc.) - I'm not sure about this.


1

A local Border's affiliate in my town actually has a book-printing machine which they will assist you in using to the extent you need it...remember, writing is writing, but there's design and typesetting work to be done which is not at all trivial (someone close to me works as a graphic designer and is presently wrangling with an author--who is intending to ...


1

Not sure how best to address Mr. Gallagher's comments as I can't seem to reply. However, it is my understanding that First Publication Rights refer to the first time your book is brought to market. Simply setting the plate at a press does not qualify, nor does making a hundred copies of your story and handing it out to friends and family. In the case of ...



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