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14

A bad metaphor is like your 81-year-old Portuguese grandfather. Really, only close family members and people from that region can even understand him at all, and even then he's talking nonsense half the time, and he talks for far too long about things most people are unfamiliar with. A good metaphor is a lot like a mime - it neatly conveys the essence of ...


10

A special method? No. There surely are guides, but I doubt their value. Poetic translation is one of the most difficult tasks of the writer craft (and probably the most difficult of the more common ones) often topping writing original poetry in means of difficulty. A guide or resource may help, but you need very, very much talent and perform a painstakingly ...


9

It's poetry. So it is totally up to the poet how to indent the poem. It was just plane writing on wall I must have taken it a serious call If he thinks that's the way it should be, then that's the correct indenting.


8

Because a poem is more compact than prose, indentation (and line breaks, spacing, leading, and anything else you can think of) can add additional meaning to the poem. So unlike prose, go ahead and indent however you like... as long as there's a reason for it. In your second example, if the poet likes the idea of pairing the couplets visually, that's the ...


8

The answer, like most things in writing, is that it depends. In my own poetry writing I've found that I am greatly helped by first learning and strictly following all stylistic guidelines. I have often been drawn towards formal verse structures such as the villanelle, Shakespearian-style sonnet, or sestina. By forcing myself to follow these guidelines, I ...


8

There's a saying I heard in a writing workshop: If you don't know what you want to say or how you want to say it, write a novel. If you know what you want to say, but not how you want to say it, write a short story. If you know what you want to say, and exactly how you want to say it, write a poem. This means that whatever your subject, you should find ...


7

You mentioned that German is not your first language, In this case, I suspect that you're modifying the syntax of the sentence in ways that native speakers would not, and thereby violating the rules of German poetics. All languages have different registers, and it is extremely common for a language to allow constructions in poetry which aren't allowed in ...


6

A short answer: The rule is there is no rule. Now, saying some useful stuff: Unless you want to fit some "standard", the indentation, as most of the punctuation, is yours. Emily Dickinson was heavily criticized for her use of punctuation in her time, although she's widely appreciated nowadays. So, a bit on the standards: every now and then a group of ...


6

Sure, what are you waiting for? Go to http://kdp.amazon.com/ and publish it right now. Log in, paste it into the form, fill out the book details and click submit. Amazon deletes you? Try Barnes and Noble. Go to http://pubit.barnesandnoble.com/. Follow the three simple steps. Barnes and Noble deletes you? Try Feedbooks. Go to ...


6

It's writing where the concept of the piece is more important than the form of it. This interview with Kenneth Goldsmith might be enlightening. Or you can read some of his own writing on the subject. This quote, I think, sums the movement up quite well: The best thing about conceptual poetry is that it doesn't need to be read. You don't have to read ...


6

A good metaphor will parallel or easily invoke the idea you're trying to convey, without extraneous or irrelevant details. It resonates with the audience and may add to the core idea. A poor metaphor has baggage of its own, doesn't track with the original concept, is too clunky, too esoteric, needs too much explanation, or becomes absurd.


6

Haiku don't have to have 17 syllables. That "rule" is based on something that makes sense in Japanese, not so much in English. The "syllables" (onji) in Japanese are in a 5 - 7- 5 pattern, but Japanese is primarily polysyllabic...so creating Haiku in English based on the same pattern is likely to result in a poem that is often too long. Haiku is less a ...


6

Abuse grammar all you wish! Leave it dead in a ditch if you must to get the rhythm right. Right now the nice imagery is being let down with by the dragging artificiality of the metre. To see why, just separate all the syllables, and annotate them to show the stresses. There is a formal way to show this, but for the purposes of clarity, I'll just bold-face ...


5

Writer's Market publishes a few different books, including one for poets, which include listings of publishers, agents, magazines, contests, anthologies, etc. You can find them in most major bookstores. They come out once a year, but there are also listings available on their paid-subscription website: http://www.writersmarket.com/ . It's worthwhile noting ...


5

Well, first off, it should be a metaphor, not a simile. :) Ahem... A great metaphor recasts the familiar or mundane as something strikingly different yet truly parallel. It gives a startlingly vivid picture or brings a surprising insight. A bad metaphor fails to achieve the parallel, or the fresh insight, or both. The element of surprise is an important ...


5

Let me start by saying that this question has already been answered and the answer is no. I've been writing and publishing haiku for about a decade now, so I wanted to weigh in. Western haiku writers, starting more or less in the early 1900s used the 5-7-5 syllable form in imitation of the Japanese. But because of the way the Japanese language works (it ...


5

At its strictest, iambic pentameter is just as rigid as you've described. "Poetry" is a dactyl (X-/-/), not an iamb (/-X), hence it shouldn't fit anywhere in an iamb-only sequence. Likewise, by the "strictest" definition, each word has a single primary stress, making the use of many polysyllabic words impossible by definition. That said, "stress" seems to ...


5

While technically you could claim a copyright on your collection, you would not have any claim of copyright for any of the individual poems included in that collection. The problem would be in getting any publisher to allow you to actually publish the collection. All of the major e-book publishers have very strict guidelines regarding the republishing of ...


5

It's a poem; you can say anything you want, and you can make the lines however long you'd like. Whether or not the end result will be perceived as inspirational or corny is another matter. While it's true the invitation will need to contain certain information, I disagree with your assertion that you must "use certain keywords, like delivery." There are ...


5

Under no circumstances will you be able to protect textual works. From a technical standpoint. Not on Kindle, not on iBooks, not on Nook, not on your smartphone, not on the web, not in a Word document, not in an encrypted email, not via voice recording. Even if you send a bitmap or some other format, if a human can read it, they can OCR it. Period end of ...


4

From "Gone With the Wind": Melanie: That's not fair. The men naturally flock to her. Scarlett's just high spirited and vivacious. Sue Ellen: Men may flirt with a girl like that but they don't marry them.


4

Are you trying to make the women look good, or bad? Like, are they deliberately hurting the men who fall for them, or have they been honest about their intentions and just can't help it if men don't believe them? If you're looking for a negative metaphor, I think the Greeks could probably help. Helen of Troy springs to mind, but maybe also Pandora, the ...


4

You might want to check out Poets & Writers. It is a bi-monthly magazine. And as it says on their home page: "If you’re looking for writing competitions, or literary magazines and small presses that welcome both new and established writers, begin here."


4

I've always preferred well-executed structured poetry to free verse, and it should be welcomed by open-minded editors. The real question is, are you really willing to change your style in order to capture more of a market that's not very large to begin with?


4

1) Stop fixing everything at once. Write your first round to get it on paper. On your second round, pick one thing to fix: sharpen your rhymes, for example. Next round, work on the meter. Let it sit for a day. Come back with fresher eyes and work on word choice. 2) Kill your darlings. Editing oneself is one of the hardest parts of writing. What this ...


4

It's sort of an anti-enjambment. I have no idea if it has a formal name.


4

I would suggest that this is a hybrid form of refrain, which is a "phrase, line, or group of lines repeated at intervals throughout a poem, generally at the end of the stanza". The usage you demonstrate isn't your typical refrain, since your example repeats a phrase from the previous sentence, and does not repeat it again. A repetend, which is a type of ...


4

I'm not a poet by any stretch of the imagination, but for what it's worth ... Perhaps what you need to do is impose more limits on your poetry to force clearer thinking. For example, I find the limiting syllabic structures of haiku to be paradoxically freeing by forcing me to choose words very carefully to express what I have to say. As a starting point, ...


4

The problem is that "glorified" is a sarcastic term. In means "wannabe" or "dressed up attempting to be something else." If you put a big fancy necklace on a dog, it's a "glorified collar." The thing actually is a collar, but you're dressing it up to try to make it more than that. A novel which has clearly been padded, stuffed, and overextended could be a ...



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