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3

Synthesising the ideas above, you could consider leaving the framework of a strict dialogue for this kind of scene. Instead of merely fleshing out the dialogue with "stage action" as suggested by Lauren Ipsum, you could start the scene as a dialogue and lead the reader into the short story of Simon White by means of a transition phrase such as "He told him ...


3

An infodump is when the author has to get a whole bunch of important information to the reader, but it's not integral to the plot at that moment. If Character 2 is ranting and finally getting something off his chest, it's not an infodump. It is the plot. It's the culmination of the plot. To keep it from being a wall of text, break it up with stage business ...


3

No, a character telling a long story is not by default an info dump. The key to making sure it's not just clunky exposition is to make sure it is not a case of 'as you know, Bob' by which I mean one character should not be telling another character something they already know. An example of this would be experienced police officers explaining procedures to ...


5

No it should not be an info dump. The story continues. The only thing that should change is you switch to the character’s voice instead of using your own. You might think of it as though your reader is going to put down your book, pick up a short story written by a character in your book and read that, and then pick up your book again. As a writer, you can ...


0

I'd suggest creating the connections as you go. I know it seems like it would make good sense to plot out the grand story first, but this approach can make the actual writing a soul-destroying experience, and tends to produce a predictable narrative. Inventing the big story on the fly is much more fun and not difficult. Just look at what's gone by and bring ...


2

J K Rowling said that she imagined her entire story nearly all at once in one sitting. That means that while the readers were doled out a single book at a time, she basically had one giant story, broken up into seven parts. If you think about it that way, connecting all of the stories together is not much more complicated than connecting elements between ...


4

There isn't a one-fits-all answer here. Generally speaking, your personal talent/skills in seeing and imagining connections will allow you less effort (and "work"/"formula"/"method") in devising them. It doesn't make you a better or worse writer to have that gift, but it certainly makes your job easier. If you want a couple of tips on how to be able to ...


1

I'm currently working on a new project, what I doing is that I'm working with an outline and think of stuff that will happen in broad strokes and how it relates to other things. Personally, I found that it helps a lot if you plan backwards that way you'll have an easier time to weave different plots and helps you in foreshadowing as well, this is what works ...


2

If you keep the reader engaged, and provide them enough interesting aspects of the story and a strong hook, then the II occurring at 10K probably won't be a problem. One thing I would recommend, though, is allowing yourself the luxury of writing the story to the story's requirement, rather than a word count. If the movement of the story goes longer than ...


1

I don't think it's necessarily what's common. It's more about what you want to do. As long as your bridging conflicts are engaging and your characters are given goals and pre-arcs, and are characterized in an engaging way during the setup, you should have no problem with this. I know that in Jaws (even though it isn't a fantasy), the author gives us the ...


1

The other answers are quite good and very detailed. I would just like to add an issue of perspective. TL;DR: Show, don't tell. A good work - especially fiction - doesn't judge its contents/subjects. It doesn't tell the readers what to think or feel. It presents situations and actions in a way that impacts the reader and causes them to form their own ...


1

I think it certainly is not true that "if you write a good story, people won't care whose feet get stepped on". If, say, you paint the Catholic Church as totally evil, I think you're going to offend a lot of Catholics. Etc for any group. If your goal is to paint some group as evil, if the purpose of your book is to expose how evil the Masons or the French ...


4

In addition to the answer by Mela Eckenfels: Do not lay blame unless it is actually warranted. The following is not something you can generally write in a book that gets published. It comes pretty close to moral relativism and that makes some people deeply uncomfortable. It is however something that anyone writing historical fiction should understand. What ...


10

Make the even the people you are blaming, likeable. People are doing bad things out of good reasons and good things out of bad reasons. And even if they do bad things out of bad reasons, the reasons might not be bad because they are bad people. They might have been misinformed. They might have been tricked. They might have been stupid. They might have ...


2

In his novel The Broken God, author David Zindell features a race of Neanderthals on a non-Earth planet who were originally Homo Sapiens, but whose forebears genetically engineered themselves into Homo Neanderthalensis bodies (apparently retaining Sapiens brains and their own identities). "How" was advanced genetic engineering, and "Why" was never as far as ...



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