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There is a difference between unresolved conflict and unaddressed conflict. Unresolved conflict pushes a story, unaddressed conflict drags the story. Both use energy (both the author's and the reader's). You want the level of total conflict to be high enough to fit the story without dragging the story down. In order to warn you away from the mistake of ...


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I'd like to state at the onset, that it's not always wrong to leave promises unfulfilled and questions unanswered. I'm a big fan of the Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami (and so are millions of others around the world), and unfulfilled promises and unanswered questions are practically his stock-in-trade. With that said, there are two main things missing ...


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Quite simply, it is impossible to kill off the protagonist before the end of the story. Killing off your main character is absolutely possible, but the protagonist you can not. The story is ultimately the protagonists struggle. If you kill him at the beginning then the book is flashbacks, you still killed him at the end of the Story. Your only telling the ...


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It's been done in at least a few books: 20 Master Plots: And How To Build Them by Tobias - amazon link Plots Unlimited (A Creative Source for Generating a Virtually Limitless Number and Variety of Story Plots and Outlines) by Sawyer & Weingarten - amazon link The Writer's Idea Thesaurus by White - amazon link and finally, one of the most terrible ...



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