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2

It sounds like you're something of a discovery writer (aka pantser). You wrote lots and lots of material, and now you have to carve away everything which doesn't fit your plot. If you are a discovery writer rather than a planner, then removing all the parts which don't belong there is part of the process of writing your first draft. Keep all the cool bits ...


3

I have been told that the sentence you should cut out is the one you love the most. I have found this true of my own writing: a really interesting section just has to go because it doesn't fit within the whole. Sometimes I have be able to re-cast an idea. Sometimes I have been able to use it in another story or play. Sometimes I have to just throw it away.


2

To me a plot driven story is like real life: you have no idea what goes on in another person's mind and all you know about them you deduce from their actions. If a person sees some event and reacts to this in a particular way, it is completely unnecessary to explain that person's motivation, because it is apparent. That is the basis of "show, don't tell". ...


1

Increase the emotional charge of the main plot. Some possibilities: Increase the intensity of the main story. Make the conflict more conflicty. For example: Maybe some of his allies, horrified at having witnessed what he is capable of, begin to see him as just as evil as the regime they are struggling to destroy. Maybe some of them abandon him, or even ...


1

Try to look at it dispassionately; it sounds like maybe the problem is just that it's had enough of an emotional impact on you that you feel like you need to give it the treatment it deserves, rather than paring it back to what is appropriate for your story. What does the audience really need to know about the character? You could write as little as ...


4

Without knowing your plot its hard to say, but I think you might have already mentioned the word at the heart of a possible solution. Circle. Don't just have his past haunt him, and explain his actions. Make him confront it again in the main plot. Bring him full circle. What you currently think is your main plot, is just the excuse to see him in action. ...


0

By no means is it super intense, but Scapple is a very streamlined graphing/charting/mind mapping application. IMO faster to use than anything similar. As a bonus it's by the developers of Scrivener so there's some compatibility there. http://www.literatureandlatte.com/scapple.php


2

Your readers will substitute either themselves or a standard archetype for the hero unless you tell them otherwise. They only will need to know enough to know why the hero is doing the things he/she does, why he/she is upset or angry at the actions of the antagonist or why the hero doesn't just take the obvious route to the story solution. Even then you only ...


2

That sounds more like a twist ending, the big reveal with "haha! I was acting this entire time!" Having the protagonist act one way the entire time and then pulling the rug out from the audience will leave them feeling a little bit confused and annoyed. If they've rooted for a genuine person all along and then they turn out to be a bitch, they won't feel ...


1

I think you may need to look at the traditional three act structure. Act one is setting up the every day life of your character(s) and ends with the inciting event which leads into act two. Act two is the main bulk of the story, leading up to a large peak and ends with that moment where it looks like your hero(ine) cannot possibly succeed. Act three is ...


6

I think there's a difference between character development and character depth. Development means change. You can have an interesting villain who is only ever a villain, but still has backstory, motivation, relationships, and hobbies. That's a deep character who doesn't change. But if your character acts like a boring, shallow buffoon for two acts and then ...



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