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What I did in one of my stories is to have the character change her mind about "fate," even while believing in "signs." Briefly, my heroine meets a man who echoes something she did before her trauma. But while she continues to believe in fate, she starts to question the premise that her fate is not to meet a kind man. Because she also takes this "echoing as ...


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Stories are the way human being make sense of life. They are an attempt to impose order on the chaotic stream of events that we experience day to day. History is the interpretation of the stream of past events as a set of stories. As such, those stories will overlap each other in the time scale. When telling multiple stories, you need some way to keep them ...


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Thanks to Bookeater for this recommendation: I'd use music to unify an arc. Out there usually human leads are used to tag arcs as people easily identify with them. This also answers another question I hadn't yet crossed yet - how many different soundtrack songs should I use in my show (anything from one for the whole show, to one for every scene). One ...


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I hate to try to divine motive, but are you sure this is a story question? It sounds more like you are trying to make an argument than tell a story, more like you are trying to find a way to convince that reader that their lives are not governed by fate than that you are trying to find a convince the character. The destruction of someone's life view is ...


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I think you need to present an alternative explanation of why things happen, and provide your character reason to believe the alternative. For example: Chaos. Everything happens at random. Have the character get to know one of two men based on the roll of a die. Human Agency: Things happen because we cause them to happen. Have the character do something ...


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I would start by "showing" what the guards are up to in the eyes of one of the plotters...then connect this vision to the eyes of another plotter who sees the same thing...thus "showing" without telling (they simply see the same thing as a pattern which implies a weakness and possible escape.) To build the suspense then have the plotters discover a "code" ...


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The pertinent question here is: what is it you're trying to show? In other words, you need to first understand what the focus and purpose of the planning scene is. Only then do you know what to show, and therefore how to do it. A few simple examples: If the purpose of the scene is to set up a brilliant plan which later fails dramatically, then you ...


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Philipp provides a good answer, but I think there is more to say. First, "show don't tell" has kind of become the touchstone of all advice about storytelling but it is good to remember that it originated as a piece of advice for novelists moving to writing screenplays. What is told in a novel must be shown in a movie. In fact, novels do have to do a fair ...


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That's why the tropes Unspoken Plan Guarantee and Impossible Mission Collapse exist. When you first describe a plan in detail and then describe its flawless execution in detail, the latter is just a retelling of the first, which is boring and redundant. It is often more interesting to have the elaborate plan fail early in some way, which challenges the ...


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Watch any of the reality TV shows in the documentary theme that are currently "popular" like Pawn Stars American Pickers Tiny House Hunters Any of the home renovation/flipping/decorating shows Pay attention to how they summarize and cut between acts. Also some of them like Pawn Stars start a story (say someone wants to sell a stuffed buffalo) but they ...


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I agree with Laura Ipsum on redemption but argue "Coming of Age" stories are more about losing childhood innocence after being exposed to the cruel realities of adult life.


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It could be both. "Coming of Age" describes how a young person puts aside childish wants and needs and accepts adult responsibilities and priorities. "Redemption" can happen at any age, and describes someone who has done bad things, recognizes that they are bad, and wants to make amends and become good (for some values of "bad" and "good"). I should ...


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There's no reason not to include it. It will display the fact that your protagonist does not exist inside a vacuum. Whilst her personal story progresses, so does everyone's, and the effects of this will be seen through the eyes of your protagonist. It will help to flesh out the characters you have created, and make the world more believable. The issue is ...


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The various parts of a novel may be tied together in different ways. They may be connected by the threads of plot. But equally they may be thematically related to each other, or provide thematic counterpoint to each other. The wholeness and integrity of a novel depends on the wholeness and integrity of its effect of the reader. If the subplots intersect ...


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A good story is fundamentally an even "match" between a hero and villain, or a protagonist and antagonist. The hero wins because s/he gets in the last shot, blow, etc. But in order to make it an "even" match, the villain has to get in the next to last shot. A story in which the hero first "scratches," then wounds, then kills the villain without being ...


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Is there any other reason to use this device in a narrative, beyond "to build tension"? Yes. In Story Robert McKee describes the structure of a story as a series of attempts at a goal met my increasingly dire setbacks until the protagonist is forced to the limits of human experience and must make a final decision, a final change of values, that alters the ...


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Sure, no problem at all. Just make sure to let the reader know as fast as possible, as they'd have to do some backtracking in their minds if they thought the chapter started with the same characters from the previous chapter. Start by immediately making the change clear, and you should be fine. In fact, i find it even more interesting to change point of ...


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Yes, you can. You just want it to be clear to the reader, be consistent throughout the chapter. Be careful with how many points of view you use throughout your book, as you can end up overwhelming your readers. I had a few readers bring them up in one of my books once. Having a few points of view, and making them definitive and unique can really add to the ...


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Yes, you can change the character and setting on a different chapter J.K Rowling changed her narratives in the beginning of 'The Goblet Of Fire' and frequently in ,Order Of The Phoenix'. Describe their feelings and sensory thoughts in your third person


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I get the sense that your protagonist is not important enough to the plot. He is instrumental in the development of the two women, but he isn't doing all that much for himself. As such, the hero is clearly a "point of view" character but I'm not convinced that he is a real protagonist. I can think of two ways to fix this. The first is to "make a virtue of ...


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Why people don't consider using a search engine before they ask questions is a mystery to me. Using Google, the first search result is a Wikipedia article for through line, which explaines that Konstantin Stanislavsky suggested the concept in his method of training actors, the "Stanislavski system", at the beginning of the 20th century. Using Google book ...



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