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This is a question with no one right answer, but if I were doing this, I might consider starting the second season with Character B and continuing up to the point where he meets Character A, and then backtracking to fill in on Character A. The advantage is that Character B gets a strong solid uninterrupted block of narrative to establish himself. The ...


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I keep a second word processing document open where I scribble down ideas and thoughts which don't fit into the current point in the story. This document is a grammar-free, style-free zone. I record the ideas as quick as I can type them, then jump back to the main document and dive back into its tempo and style. I make no promises to the ideas in ...


1

The writers Margaret Mitchell, John Irving, Graham Greene, Mickey Spillane, Richard Peck, Edgar Allan Poe, J.K. Rowling, and Agatha Christie all famously write/wrote their endings first, according to this website. So, you might want to reverse your thinking. Concoct the previous scene from the bones of what you've just finished writing. This ensures that ...


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It depends on what kind of writer you are. NaNoWriMo doesn't have anything to do with it. Some people are "pants" or "discovery" writers. Whether they write the whole thing in a month or a year or a decade, they sit and type to see what happens. Some people are plotters. Again, the amount of time they spend to get a word count is irrelevant; they have to ...


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When you ramble a lot you will be inconsistent in delivering and imagine the kind of comprehensive emotions you will create for the reader. But in all what matters is how well it may go with the plot in context. Thank you.


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They do it for know entities, they would NEVER trust an outsider to do it. 99% of the reject pile, most of it un-read, is from spin-offs of pre-existing movies or shows. They are taking a big financial risk with newcomers; they don’t want what their average trusted minions can produce. In other words If you ARE IN you can as mediocre as you want, but ...


1

Marks can indicate that the hero is "special" - chosen, if you will - and because the reader identifies with the hero, they too can feel like they're special. Is it a necessary device? That depends on the discretion of the author. Sure, there are "everyman" heroes who happen to be at the wrong place at the wrong time, and are brought along for the ride by ...


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Is this a sign of bad writing? No. You don't even have to have a 'main' plot. See these plot summaries of Pulp Fiction for a good example - different viewers have different ideas as to which is the most important plot line.


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Heroes are different because readers are different. Some readers are lonely people that feel excluded from the social life of their peers. They feel ugly, abominable, as if they carry a stigma that repulses everyone. They feel marked by a cruel god. These readers can identify with a hero who is an outsider in his society because of a mark he carries. And ...


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It's often struck me that there are two very different kinds of heroes in fiction in this sense. Some are heroes because they trained and practiced and studied or did some sort of hard work to get where they are. Others are heroes because they were born with some special status or destiny. Superman is a hero because he was born with "powers and abilities far ...


1

Writers love their heroes. Look, my first male hero in my first story was actually me, myself. And I obviously wanted my hero to be my better self, more muscles, more manly, more outgoing... So, I obviously gave such treats to my hero Lots of people like to pimp their ride You already bought the best phone on the market. And after few days you realized, ...


3

You're right that it's a cliche and they don't "need to". it is quite silly and one would expect it only from mediocre or lazy writters I agree. See TV Tropes: Birthmark of Destiny See also scars, beards and hairstyles. Villains also sometimes come with convenient labels, e.g. The Omen's Damien: See TV Tropes: Mark of the Beast. Frodo is one ...


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I'll bet you can learn a lot from what you've already done... Write down the plots of the very short stories that you've already written. Notice how "long" they are. Compare your short stories' plots to the plots you're planning for your longer stories. How do the longer plots differ from the shorter ones? Sketch a few plots that seem more like the shorter ...


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Short stories are great because they concentrate on a single moment: the moment after which something in the character's life has changed and they can no longer ignore it. You can keep the story short by concentrating only on how the character reacts to this change, and you know that the story is done when they arrive at a decision. You can look to Raymond ...


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I don't believe there really are long ideas or short ideas. Instead, there are just ideas. Even if you say that your plot is very detailed, it doesn't really matter. Instead, it all depends upon how you write the scenes. Here's the entire Wizard Of Oz (by Frank Baum) story. The year is 1935. The place, a dirt road, somewhere in Kansas. Dorothy, ...


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Write down the ideas that are too long for later use (and to free your mind) and just keep developing new ideas until you hit on something that has the right length. Generating ideas works best if you don't censor your thoughts, and trying to limit your ideas to the right length will only impede your idea generator. So let it flow. Eventually something will ...



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