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This wasn't a "death," but a resignation, that had a similar effect. I once had a boss who people expected to go to the top. He left for a better job, and just about everyone in his "sector" was sorry to him go. We all felt that he had very big shoes to fill. That was in fact the case. But his departure created opportunities for no less than five people ...


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Sorry, but I see no real connection between the two plots ! Clarissa appears in the two stories, but that is all ! I don't think you can consider B as a subplot of A. Do you plan to set any interactions between the characters of the two worlds ? Will the actions of Richard have any influence on the plot involving Ophelia (or vice-versa) ?


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I have never heard the term "dual novel" before (do you mean a novel with a dual timeline?) I'm currently using the Snowflake method to outline several books in a series, so perhaps I can be of help! I'm making one "snowflake" per book, but when characters are reappearing, I can reuse steps that deal with their backstory, psychology and the like. The key ...


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I'd guess this isn't a romance novel :) As you've said, the character's death sets events in motion that wouldn't have happened otherwise. You're giving your other characters the opportunity to react to that; you're giving yourself plenty of opportunity for other sudden changes (shifting of allegiances, strong characters giving up, weak characters finding ...


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There is one rule in writing from which everything else stems: you write for the reader. However, from that rule, you can deduce that if you turn out a novel that you know could have been better, you are cheating the reader from reading it. You've examined other possible routes which do not include the character's death, but you've found that none of them ...


2

This is the key: these alternatives don't quite deliver the same effect If the alternatives don't create the effect you want in the reader, they're not good alternatives. If killing the character creates the effect you want in the reader, kill the character. Trust your instincts. You're a storyteller. You know what you are doing.


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Of course! If people don't die, it's rather unrealistic in my opinion.


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My advice (Probably not helpful advice, but still) Make the character relatable You have probably heard this a million times, but it is important. Many readers, including me, are turned off by relatable characters. And I've also learned "relatable" does not mean "average". The character could be the leader of an empire, but they're still human. They have ...


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So basically, the question is, how can she change her mind on fate, given that she takes every event that happens to her as fated? That's a tough one. Well, a turning point here could be an intellectual one. Let's assume, as you mentioned, she believes she's not fates to meet a kind man. Rather than having events prove her wrong by introducing her to a ...


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This seems to be a problem for a lot of writer. My advice is to incorporate as many as you can with the story still making sense. The rest just need to be discarded, or put into another that story. Hope this helped!


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I see three keys to character-driven stories: The character wants something strongly enough to struggle for it. The character has a unique reason for wanting the thing. Something about the character makes the struggle more difficult. The first one is common to all stories. I'm not sure the second one is essential, but it sure helps. Give the character a ...


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Character-Driven Story Is Driven From Self-Concept Self-concept is one of the strongest powers on earth. That's because so many people have self-concepts which put them at odds with the world around them. Self-concept drives the actions a person takes. Because it is so real, it is the essence of what we search for in our stories. Self-Concept Drives ...


2

Some people do. I don't. I prefer to discover who my characters are by just writing them. I'll put them in scene after scene with each other and see what happens. Sometimes the unexpected happens. This requires a lot of exploratory writing that might not make it into the final draft, but I find that this technique creates characters that are more natural, ...


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By definition, character-driven fiction is that where the plot takes a back seat to the characters. What's essential? Everything that's in a plot-driven story, really, just in a different balance. There is usually a plot, but its purpose is to keep the readers engaged while the author digs into the characters. A teacher of mine said plot is the shiny keys ...


3

I see your problem, humans can show striking ingenuity in constructing narratives to support the notion that everything is a divine sign. I can only come up with two solutions: The chaotic one. Rather than trying to destroy her narrative, have her realize that different narratives can be constructed around the same events and take agency as the writer of ...


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Let everything fall apart in your idea of what should happen - I am referring to your 'turning point' since I don't know what it means, and the only person it matters to is you. Then see what happens. After the structure, the rules. After the after.



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