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I don't believe there really are long ideas or short ideas. Instead, there are just ideas. Even if you say that your plot is very detailed, it doesn't really matter. Instead, it all depends upon how you write the scenes. Here's the entire Wizard Of Oz (by Frank Baum) story. The year is 1935. The place, a dirt road, somewhere in Kansas. Dorothy, ...


4

I keep a second word processing document open where I scribble down ideas and thoughts which don't fit into the current point in the story. This document is a grammar-free, style-free zone. I record the ideas as quick as I can type them, then jump back to the main document and dive back into its tempo and style. I make no promises to the ideas in ...


3

You're right that it's a cliche and they don't "need to". it is quite silly and one would expect it only from mediocre or lazy writters I agree. See TV Tropes: Birthmark of Destiny See also scars, beards and hairstyles. Villains also sometimes come with convenient labels, e.g. The Omen's Damien: See TV Tropes: Mark of the Beast. Frodo is one ...


2

It depends on what kind of writer you are. NaNoWriMo doesn't have anything to do with it. Some people are "pants" or "discovery" writers. Whether they write the whole thing in a month or a year or a decade, they sit and type to see what happens. Some people are plotters. Again, the amount of time they spend to get a word count is irrelevant; they have to ...


1

The writers Margaret Mitchell, John Irving, Graham Greene, Mickey Spillane, Richard Peck, Edgar Allan Poe, J.K. Rowling, and Agatha Christie all famously write/wrote their endings first, according to this website. So, you might want to reverse your thinking. Concoct the previous scene from the bones of what you've just finished writing. This ensures that ...


1

I'll bet you can learn a lot from what you've already done... Write down the plots of the very short stories that you've already written. Notice how "long" they are. Compare your short stories' plots to the plots you're planning for your longer stories. How do the longer plots differ from the shorter ones? Sketch a few plots that seem more like the shorter ...


1

This is a question with no one right answer, but if I were doing this, I might consider starting the second season with Character B and continuing up to the point where he meets Character A, and then backtracking to fill in on Character A. The advantage is that Character B gets a strong solid uninterrupted block of narrative to establish himself. The ...


1

Marks can indicate that the hero is "special" - chosen, if you will - and because the reader identifies with the hero, they too can feel like they're special. Is it a necessary device? That depends on the discretion of the author. Sure, there are "everyman" heroes who happen to be at the wrong place at the wrong time, and are brought along for the ride by ...


1

Writers love their heroes. Look, my first male hero in my first story was actually me, myself. And I obviously wanted my hero to be my better self, more muscles, more manly, more outgoing... So, I obviously gave such treats to my hero Lots of people like to pimp their ride You already bought the best phone on the market. And after few days you realized, ...



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