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7

It depends on the genre and what you're trying to achieve, but it's certainly an accepted literary tool. The good ol' Man vs Self conflict. It'll almost certainly result in a character-driven novel, but there's nothing wrong with character-driven novels!


6

It's totally okay, and makes for a nice vehicle of the theme (the plot itself is the deepest, subtlest and thus most effective means of making argument, as opposed to say the dialogue/opinions of your characters). But you shouldn't worry about whether or not it's arbitrarily "okay". Hesitation holds new writers back, and one of the quickest ways to develop ...


4

Near the end of the book, have a character comment on it, and perhaps express some kind of emotion about the mystery. If I remember right, Stephen King did that in The Colorado Kid. This trick—have a character comment on it—is useful whenever you want to make it clear that you are aware of something that may bother the reader. Not only unresolved story ...


3

It's a nice irony, that's all. But to give it depth you have to elaborate on the memory wipe. Are the memories gone forever? In which case the whole ordeal has much less importance to the plot than if they could regain their memories back, possibly generating further conflict. Sure they can find out about their past from other people, but since they can't ...


3

You might need to clarify your question: I'm not sure exactly what you mean. But maybe: (a) As Dale Emery says, have the character's comment on it. If, for example, you never mention what Fred does for a living, the reader may not even notice that you don't bring it up. Or if it's obviously relevant, the reader may wonder if the author made a mistake by ...


3

Just skip to the next plot point and write that. Chances are that later on you'll think of a way to bridge the two, and then you can come back and fill in the details when that happens. I would guess that very few writers proceed sequentially through an entire work. It's good to jump around when you're finding yourself stuck; there's no point in stagnating ...


3

I would say it would depend on whether specifics of the device has any bearing on the plot. In your example the bomb specifications themselves don't seem to be relevant to the story.


2

A good twist fits into the story organically, at least in hindsight. So it doesn't have to be foreshadowed, necessarily, but there should be elements of the former plot that take a new shape after the twist, for sure. A good twist doesn't just change the story, it actually improves it. So Sixth Sense, as the obvious example, was an okay ghost story before ...


2

I think your question is a bit shallow for proper answer, but i will try to discribe: 1) What kind of story are you telling? Is is criminal story about your hero going in pathway of the briefcase bomb maker? If it is, your hero will need some information about that briefcase. Color, weight, maybe small details as locks, material of the briefcase or such ...


2

Several good answers and I don't want to repeat what they said, but let me add: I think you can almost always get away with ONE coincidence that gets the story rolling. Like suppose the story begins with two people who are fierce business rivals just happening to meet in a social setting and becoming romantically involved, only discovering their identity as ...


2

Do you have some other parts of the story worked out? I would just jump ahead for now and write the next scene that you "know". Then, before you know it, you can fill the gap.


2

We can't tell you what should happen in your story. (In fact, questions asking what to write are off-topic here.) But perhaps you can ask yourself a few questions: If the scene is described graphically, in gory detail, what effect will that have on the reader? Will it help to further the story, or will it cause the reader to put the book down in disgust? ...


2

It's called a "braided novel" or "braided narrative", because you have several points of view, or storylines, merging into a whole later on. For example, George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones books are like this.


2

If you want to include a place: Give characters a reason to go there. Have the characters interact with the things that make the place interesting to you (or to the characters, or to readers). Show the characters' sensory experience of the place, and their opinions of what they experience.


1

Let there be important actions and / or information at those places, that are needed for the story. Otherwise the reader may always think you just try to "make pages"... One of the worst books I ever read was that way. Hundreds of pages because the protagonist just wanted to watch animals ... That had nothing to do with the story and was just annoying, ...


1

Typically, I see this being done three different ways in the books I've read: A) The narrative is a journey: This is the simplest reason to visit many different places --the narrative is a trip, and each place is a natural stop along the way. B) There are Important Things located in each place. This can feel a bit cliche, but it's an old standard in ...


1

In combination with "lampshading" the unsolved mystery in dialogue, as mentioned in the answers by Jay and Dale Hartley Emery, you can demonstrate that your unanswered question is intentional by putting it right at the beginning or right at the end of the story, i.e. at the parts of the story where readers know that the writer is most likely to have ...


1

It seems as if you are describing a story like Les Miserables which has various subplots, but it main thread is the story of Jean Valjean, which is like a story within a story Is this the type of story you are going for?


1

So first of all, don't know what your story is about, writing style, etc. That said: I dunno if you've read Lord of the Flies, but there is an excellently handled scene there where someone falls to their death. It does describe the outcome - brains on a rock - but it's a quick, short description. However, because we have grown to know the character, the ...


1

It'll depend on what impression you wish to convey; If it's the horror of the boy's death, don't. It'll have more impact, and you won't distract the reader with details he might not want to know, or can perfectly imagine himself. On the other hand, if you're writing on the boy's point of view, you might want to convey his last moments to the reader. In ...



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