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Two authors divide duties, not content One very successful technique was the one used by Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp in their wonderful fantasy romps such as Land of Unreason and The Incomplete Enchanter. Pratt, at the time the much more experienced and accomplished of the two, would rough out a plot. They would bounce it back and forth until it ...


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1. Planning Decide where your editorial calendar will live. Possible options include Google Calendar, Podio, Trello, and Asana. Each of these systems is great for multi-user management, and all of them have free versions. 2. Start building Start with a calendar that marks important dates. For instance, if I'm a romance writer, I'll be sure to include ...


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At least part of why we read is to learn something --that doesn't mean the characters in the story need to learn something, and it doesn't necessarily mean a moral lesson. You might simply learn what it feels like to be put in an extreme situation, for instance. Having a theme enhances this sense of learning, and without it, one may feel somehow cheated. ...


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I don't think the power or weight of a message, if well-written, is lost or changed by being camouflaged or not. Some premises are made very obvious early on (think His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman), but that explicit theme doesn't detract from the book; unless you do not like the message. If someone is not aligned with your message, it will be ...


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Why are people willing to die in a revolution? Why do they sacrifice their lives to charitable work? Why do they protest against injustice even if it's not their own cause? This is the inner desire, our inner will to make a change for the better, to cause a memorable impact. If a book is immersive and the cause presented synergizes with beliefs of the ...


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The power comes from the fact that the premise (as it is called) is a commonly accepted truth, something that everyone wants to be true (e.g. in the end, evil gets punished), or something that you manage to show to be true. The latter is the most difficult, but the most powerful. Search for the book "The Moral Premise" by Stanley D. Williams.


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This is a cool question. I think in the case you speak of, the author may not have been writing with a specific theme in mind. The author could have just been telling a story, throwing characters into hell and seeing how the characters react so to speak. Some authors don't write with a theme in mind, but let the readers interpret the work how they see fit. ...


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In the case of a story I am toying with, the theme (or more accurately, the idea) I am trying to bring across has a bearing on the structure of the story, the plot and the different details I bring out or emphasise in different parts of the story. Since these elements are determined in part by the theme, they should, in theory, cohere well together. Since ...


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A few guidelines I learned from Dean Wesley Smith and Kristine Kathryn Rusch: Describe whatever the character has an opinion about. This guideline helps me figure out what to describe. If it matters to the character in the moment, it goes in. Describing through the character's five senses makes the descriptions rich and vivid. Whatever you describe, ...


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I have the same problem --plot is my strength and description is my weakness. I think it corresponds with being a "big picture" person rather than detail-oriented. Something that helps me is to remember that description isn't just decoration, it can do a lot of substantive work. It can foreshadow, echo, or recall plot elements. It can develop a subtext, ...



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