New answers tagged

1

"Stock characters" are shortcuts to creating characters. As such, you want to limit their use to secondary characters that nevertheless play important parts in one or more scenes. Doctors are examples of stock characters. They may play an important role in saving the life of the hero or heroine, for instance. But they do this in their roles as physicians, ...


7

I think we need to make a distinction between a stereotype and an archetype here. The two are often confused, as illustrated by Wikipedia's unhelpful definition of a stock character: A stock character is a stereotypical person whom audiences readily recognize from frequent recurrences in a particular literary tradition. Stock characters are archetypal ...


0

"In a nutshell," Romeo and Juliet was the "classic" story along this line. Admittedly, that was a "boy-girl" story, but you could have an "all boy" story along similar lines. The two schools are "rivals" after all. If there was a plot development that made them "hate" each other, that would create the conflict you want.


0

I've always written my History using 3x5 cards and reading what I think are the salient aspects from a Primary Source. My first work concerned the use of lead shot as a contributing factor in the decline of the North American duck population. (Seriously. I was 14 years old when I wrote it.) So I went to "the Library" and read all the articles arguing for and ...


1

To be unoriginal the new friend can have the proverbial "deep dark secret."


1

I think I understand what you're after. Here are a few examples that come to mind: Karl quietly befriends boy, boy is mocked or teased by others, boy is significantly injured or killed as a result of bullying or self-harming, and Karl carries the weight of having done nothing. Karl befriends boy, is jealous of boy because of confidence or other issues, ...


1

Let's start with 2. It's up to you - nobody decides anything about your manuscript except you. Do you want them to be background characters? Then let them be background characters. Do you want them to play a major part? Then don't let them be background characters. As for 1, It would be controversial if you wished it to be so, by assigning certain ...


1

The great thing about writing fiction is that generally you can make it whatever you want. As others have stated, a lot of vampires in fiction are completely different from each other. One of the most successful vampire fiction franchises breaks pretty much all of the old school rules. If you don't like Twilight vampires that's okay. I was just using them as ...


1

Vampires are fictional. You make up their characteristics. Vampires, in fiction, have evolvled over time. Try reading Bram Stocker's Dracula so you can see what the original was.


1

As others have said, the main conflict is what the main character wants and can't get. But I think the point that needs making here is about what plot is. I think it is all to easy to get into the habit of thinking of plot as a kind of history. You can meticulously develop an imaginary history and write it down, including lots of conflicts, without ...


0

Honestly, I think you might be overthinking it and trying to use improper abstraction to understand detective fiction. So instead of explaining conflict in typical detective fiction, I'll use an abstraction I find more convenient, which should be broadly applicable to understanding the conflict if you wish. Hope it helps. thesis The society we live in is ...


4

This related answer may help you, but I'll expand more here: I think it was J. Michael Straczynski, writer of Bablyon 5, who wrote that one could sum up "conflict" in three questions: What does the character want? What will the character do to get it? What will someone do to stop the character? As noted in some of the other excellent answers here, the ...


2

My two cents! Which cost me significantly more after this morning's referendum result, mind you... What's conflict? Conflict exists when one desire is opposed to another. The opposing desires can belong to two different characters: Batman wants to punch Joker in the face But Joker wants to not be punched in the face Or the opposing desires ...


1

There is nothing wrong here it just feels you don't like your conflict to be nerve gripping and mind boggling. I understand your concern and find it very genuine cause as long as you don't satisfy your own nerve you won't be happy about what outcome will be. I know you never asked about probable conflicts but I wrote them cause I feel you are not happy ...


2

Excellent question, to which you have partially provided your own answer, though you don't seem to realize it. You said: The goal is to catch whoever did the crime, or maybe prove he's guilty. There's nothing really standing in the way of that, unless you count the detectives' simple ignorance of all the facts. And that hardly seems like it could ...


1

AFAIK from casual encounters to comic writing advice (I read stuff that sometimes has them) the actual workflow is more like: Write a summary of the story, with the sequence of events you want to have in it, and the characters, props and places relevant to events described to degree sufficient for yourself. Split the sequence of events to pages. Each page ...



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