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In addition to all the other excellent advice that was already given, I would like to point out that in our society (Western culture) violence towards children is a very strong taboo, so much so that in some countries it is even forbidden by law for parents to physically punish their children. While children do become the victims of all kinds of violence in ...


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The moment after the boy begins to fall, he might realize the inevitability of his imminent death. That point, while he is still in mid-air and has only begun to fall, might be a logical place to break off. In most modernist novels, as well as in contemporary commercial fiction, nothing is included that does not somehow advance the story. Corollaries ...


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So first of all, don't know what your story is about, writing style, etc. That said: I dunno if you've read Lord of the Flies, but there is an excellently handled scene there where someone falls to their death. It does describe the outcome - brains on a rock - but it's a quick, short description. However, because we have grown to know the character, the ...


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Not knowing what your "purpose" of the story is, it's hard to give any solid advice. You could ask yourself: How can I best describe the death such that it supports my purpose? You can always scratch it later. It might be a chance to discuss something seemingly unrelated. For example, when you fall, your entire life flashes by. This is an opportunity to ...


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The thing with novels is that they're really squishy in form/shape until you decide what you want to do with yours. So as for "should I show the death"...what do you like to read? Are you turned off by explicit scenes? Or do you feel that without showing the scene, something important to your story is lost? As others have said, often the shape your book ...


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It'll depend on what impression you wish to convey; If it's the horror of the boy's death, don't. It'll have more impact, and you won't distract the reader with details he might not want to know, or can perfectly imagine himself. On the other hand, if you're writing on the boy's point of view, you might want to convey his last moments to the reader. In ...


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We can't tell you what should happen in your story. (In fact, questions asking what to write are off-topic here.) But perhaps you can ask yourself a few questions: If the scene is described graphically, in gory detail, what effect will that have on the reader? Will it help to further the story, or will it cause the reader to put the book down in disgust? ...



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