Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

As many have suggested, there are many ways to do this. I'll ignore the problems with flashbacks and backstories for now, because I think it's going to be the same problem no matter how you choose to structure your work. You can either go for true parallelism, where both heroes are going through the same thing at the same time. So, for example, at the ...


0

My first advice to anyone using parallel-narrative / multiple-1st-POV technique (which by the way is my favorite story-telling style) is this... Make Each POV Character's voice and world-view distinct. Each character should be instantly recognizable from the moment they "pick up the microphone". You, the author, will be switching between time-lines ...


1

Read George RR Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire series. Something like a dozen POV characters per book, cross-continent, secondary/tertiary/quaternary characters. Totally doable. Also, this question might be useful to you, even though your book is not first-person: First person pov with more than one main chars


0

Read the novel "The night circus" by Erin Morngenstern . There are lots of parallel time lines in different chapters . There are no specificic exclusive indicators to the reader as to what timeline it is , but the very narrative makes the reader to quickly figure out which time line it belongs to, by overlapping the ending word pictures of the previous ...


0

Try it and see if it works. Theme-led storytelling might give you direction and conviction. It's not how most people write but I would suggest that makes it all the more interesting to try. It's my go to method and I believe it's vaild. I have made my living writing professionally in film and TV for 25 years. As for the people suggesting you'll be ...


0

I have to disagree with @what. While it's true that nobles are born and raised with many advantages ON THE AVERAGE, there is still a large fluctuation about the mean. And a stupid noble will often not be more successful and happier than a stupid ditch digger, for the obvious reason that the stupid noble is out of place, forced to attempt to perform at a ...


2

If you're after a medieval/renaissance style, there is of course Shakespeare, Marlowe and Bacon to draw from, but bear in mind these guys were writing for stage & so in a heightened style, often employing poetic devices that a person speaking in real life wouldn't use. Project Gutenberg has a collection of the love letters of King Henry VIII, which gives ...


3

If you want to write a noble character, you have to first understand what nobility is about. Your comment – "To convey a more finer upper class breeding." – conveys to me that you don't actually think that nobels are any different from us common folk, but arrogantly believe so themselves. The fact is that individuals from noble families know their lineage a ...



Top 50 recent answers are included