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10

There are plotters, and discovery writers. You sound like a plotter. There's nothing wrong with that. Take the time you need to outline your story so you feel comfortable with it, and additionally accept that things will change as you go. There are many different methods to creating a plot, and none of them are wrong; you just have to figure out what works ...


8

The "first draft" and extensive re-writing you alluded to is often what "pantsers" - people who write by the seat of their pants, without outlines, produce. Those aren't what I would really call a first draft, since they can be unstructured messes or streams of consciousness (though they can sometiems be good). They then take that material and structure it, ...


7

I think we need to make a distinction between a stereotype and an archetype here. The two are often confused, as illustrated by Wikipedia's unhelpful definition of a stock character: A stock character is a stereotypical person whom audiences readily recognize from frequent recurrences in a particular literary tradition. Stock characters are archetypal ...


5

There isn't a one-fits-all answer here. Generally speaking, your personal talent/skills in seeing and imagining connections will allow you less effort (and "work"/"formula"/"method") in devising them. It doesn't make you a better or worse writer to have that gift, but it certainly makes your job easier. If you want a couple of tips on how to be able to ...


4

You could, but having separate stories is a good idea as well. Knowing the outcome can actually make the story more interesting; think of Anakin Skywalker, who everyone knew from the beginning was going to become Darth Vader. The interesting part here is how he became evil, rather than the discovery of it. You could also, as you mentioned, fuse the two ...


4

There are two kinds of series: (a) What is really one very long story that is broken into pieces for convenience or marketing purposes. That is, if a story takes 1000 pages, rather than try to sell one 1000-page book, we instead make a trilogy and sell three 330-page books. This makes each book more manageable and makes pricing more realistic. Etc. (b) A ...


4

This related answer may help you, but I'll expand more here: I think it was J. Michael Straczynski, writer of Bablyon 5, who wrote that one could sum up "conflict" in three questions: What does the character want? What will the character do to get it? What will someone do to stop the character? As noted in some of the other excellent answers here, the ...


3

J K Rowling said that she imagined her entire story nearly all at once in one sitting. That means that while the readers were doled out a single book at a time, she basically had one giant story, broken up into seven parts. If you think about it that way, connecting all of the stories together is not much more complicated than connecting elements between ...


3

Print Edition If you want to publish a paperback edition, you can use CreateSpace or other print-on-demand (POD) service. CreateSpace (and maybe the others) take no money up front. They take a cut of each sale. And the retailer takes a cut of each sale. You set the retail price, and your royalty is whatever is left over after CreateSpace and the retailer ...


3

I think that the greatest factor you have to consider is the length of your story. Would combining the stories make your book into a 150,000 word epic? Or if they were separate would there not be enough substance that you would have to invent a lot of filler just to get the word count up? There is precedent for having the stories separate or combined, so ...


3

Well, this is a tough question. You've provided a lot of background and it's still a tough question to answer. I'm tempted to say yes and no, at the same time. In fact, I'm gonna stick my neck out there and just say it: yes and no. Yes, your highly detailed outline is essentially a first draft. But it's also not. Many authors craft extensive, highly-...


3

Are you writing for fun and to relax after your job? Then follow your inspiration as David Roberts suggests. But do not expext to ever finish a book, because very likely what you perceive as inspiration is the joy in dreaming up stories coupled with an unwillingness to do the less pleasant parts of a writer's job. Or are you writing to publish? Then finish ...


2

We can't tell you what should happen in your story. (In fact, questions asking what to write are off-topic here.) But perhaps you can ask yourself a few questions: If the scene is described graphically, in gory detail, what effect will that have on the reader? Will it help to further the story, or will it cause the reader to put the book down in disgust? (...


2

I think you would be better off writing some of the story and discovering along the way where this story fits into the grand scheme of things, or even if it does. I also have a vague plot and some momentum going in the first few chapters that I'm very excited about, but while there is likely potential for a number of stories to be extrapolated from the ...


2

Start writing. Don't be so afraid to get it wrong. A writer can get a long way by emphasizing quantity over quality.


2

Writing and World building are different. It sounds to me that, even though you like the world building part, you could be postponing the writing part. If you ever want to finish a book, it is critical that you like writing. So let's test it. Just write a small story. It could be a side story, it could be the main plot of your book, it could be a story ...


2

Excellent question, to which you have partially provided your own answer, though you don't seem to realize it. You said: The goal is to catch whoever did the crime, or maybe prove he's guilty. There's nothing really standing in the way of that, unless you count the detectives' simple ignorance of all the facts. And that hardly seems like it could ...


2

My two cents! Which cost me significantly more after this morning's referendum result, mind you... What's conflict? Conflict exists when one desire is opposed to another. The opposing desires can belong to two different characters: Batman wants to punch Joker in the face But Joker wants to not be punched in the face Or the opposing desires ...


1

There is nothing wrong here it just feels you don't like your conflict to be nerve gripping and mind boggling. I understand your concern and find it very genuine cause as long as you don't satisfy your own nerve you won't be happy about what outcome will be. I know you never asked about probable conflicts but I wrote them cause I feel you are not happy ...


1

AFAIK from casual encounters to comic writing advice (I read stuff that sometimes has them) the actual workflow is more like: Write a summary of the story, with the sequence of events you want to have in it, and the characters, props and places relevant to events described to degree sufficient for yourself. Split the sequence of events to pages. Each page ...


1

I applaud your ambition to develop the habit of writing every day. I now understand why you want exercises. The WritingExercises.co.uk has a number of writing prompts and exercises. Rather than worrying just about writing, you might want to think about spending some time editing every day in order to improve your writing.


1

I heard a really great interview... by someone... somewhere... can't remember though - I'm only saying this because I don't want to take credit for the answer. The essence of what he said is that whenever you ask an author what they do when they write, they're always going to tell you the things that came hard for them, or the things they really had to work ...


1

Focus on the highlights. Whenever you watch a game recap on television, they don't replay the entire game. Instead, they just show you the highlights. You need to do the same with your writing. Identify three or four crucial elements within the game itself: someone scoring, someone getting hurt, or someone making an important save. If you focus on those ...


1

I'm currently working on a new project, what I doing is that I'm working with an outline and think of stuff that will happen in broad strokes and how it relates to other things. Personally, I found that it helps a lot if you plan backwards that way you'll have an easier time to weave different plots and helps you in foreshadowing as well, this is what works ...


1

I started out refusing to write a trilogy. I enjoy reading series, but I sometimes think writers like Christopher Paolini just needs a better editor who was willing to trim his series down into one book. I finally had to admit I was writing a trilogy because I had three very distinct stories. At the end of the first story , the characters succeed in their ...


1

The theme (I think that's what you're talking about) is something that is often part of a novel, but it's not part of the plot at all, if that makes sense. The theme is also not the concept (a vague, 7-ish word plot summary) or the premise (which is a one or two sentence description of your novel with specifics). I think that's where you're getting messed ...


1

I've found that the best time to write is when the inspiration is active and flowing on its own. If you've got thoughts and images pressing to the front of your brain and the words and outlines are presenting themselves - write them down! Don't put it off. Then, when the urgency to work on your 8 book series begins to wane, switch gears back to the novel ...


1

In my experience, language that conveys higher social-economic status generally has a wider vocabulary, uses more complex or rare words (and more foreign words), is (at least superficially) more polite, and is more indirect and euphemistic. It tends to be abstract and emotionally removed, and can be poetic in a clever or intellectual way. It's basically an ...


1

To answer the questions as simply as possible: Yes it is too similar. No you won't be sued, with what you're worried about is a cease & desist and no that won't happen either. And I assume even though there's a question mark at the end of University that's not a question but to be thorough my answer is 'Okay.'


1

I'm not entirely sure your example demonstrates the lack of public stakes. The world of the novel is the immediate world the character inhabits, a social world that encompasses all the characters whose lives are affected by what happens in the novel. In your Jane Austin example, this would then suggest that the public stakes would be the social standing of, ...



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