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5

If it's your first draft, just write it as it comes. You can't edit a blank page. After your first draft, go back through and clean up the polyglossolalia. If you're writing in third person, pick one language and make it all that. (Obviously if your characters speak multiple languages, you can decide what to keep and what to translate.) If you're writing ...


4

Elric of Melniboné by Michael Moorcock involved an elvish emperor who sacrificed his own people, and was frequently in conflict with human warriors. Elric's motivations and observations were described well by the author, such that the reader could relate. Heaven's Reach by David Brin involved two non-human protagonists, one being a chimpanzee, the other ...


3

I doubt that there's a definitive answer to this. Different writers have different styles and different things that work for them. Personally, my approach is that for the first draft, I just throw words on paper. Whatever comes to my mind I type into the computer. Once I have a whole bunch of words down, then I go back and clean it up. I rewrite sentences ...


2

A book has a moral premise. A character has a goal. You can have as many protagonists and parallel storylines as you want, but your book (or series) still only illustrates one single moral premise. The moral premise is what bundles a bunch of otherwise unrelated narrative strands that would better have been presented as separate publications into a ...


2

An interesting option I have noticed used, in mostly older movies, is the late introduction of, ultimately, the most important character. For instance, there might be a multi-character story set on a moving train in which various characters act out their specific issues (one's nervous about seeing family, another's heading to a new job, etc.) and they each ...


2

Originally, in folk belief, elves where dangerous and mysterious beings, whose motifs where unfathomable to man and like forces of nature beyond the categories of good or evil: if you put your hand in the fire it will burn you, without any evil intent on the fire's part; if you dealt with elves they were just as likely to help as to hurt you as the wind or ...


2

Up to the writing. If you create characters with whom your audience can identify in some fashion, someone to root for, then their species doesn't matter. Diane Duane has many non-human protagonists and hero characters in her various books: sentient fish and trees in her Young Wizards series, Romulans and Vulcans in her Star Trek books, a series about ...


2

One way of approaching this may be to commit to the linguistic styles of your characters and let the story develop a "slang" that you introduce to your readers through annotation provided by the narrator. Exact, literal translation is not as important as conveying meaning. Consider providing frequent, explicit crutches early in the text before settling on ...


2

Focusing on the theme can help immensely. You described it as: (The main point of the story is how each person sees the world differently and interprets the objective reality through subjective lenses) All prior stories I am familiar with that explore this theme use overlapping timelines, e.g. the same event told from 4 different characters' POVs. You ...


1

I like the characters and I think it would make a really engaging story. What you have running there is a pretty good style and if done right, the readers won't put down the book. But then again, having just a style is usually not sufficient if you want the novel to be commercially hit. Most commercial novels have a generic structure - those three acts- the ...


1

The problem is that the complexity increases exponentially with additional points of view. Ideally, you'd have only one point of view, the teen. At most, you should have two, the teen and his mentor, who increases the complexity by two squared or four. The people on the train should not be "point of view" characters, but rather minor characters. To use ...


1

Either I'm misunderstanding what you have said or I think you need something to tie various people together. I was just thinking of the disaster movie 'Towering Inferno' and obviously what tied really diverse people together was a fire. However, all the individual reactions to it, including the many deaths, were eventually subsumed by the putting out of fire ...


1

Consider that there may be no central character premise, and that the story does not conclude by delivering a moral. (Typo'd as "amoral".) Perhaps the central premise is the train crash. Within that context, how are the characters changed, individually? If they interact, is their world-view challenged? Is their sense of certainty and self worth ...



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