New answers tagged

0

Plagiarism is an academic violation. If you wrote a scholarly article for a professional journal and did not give proper credit to your sources, you would be guilty of plagiarism. If you were caught you might lose academic standing, maybe even lose your job at the university. But works of fiction are not scholarly articles. We do not normally expect a work ...


0

No, I know of several fantasy authors who not only use citations without the philosopher's name, but attribute the quotes to a fictional author who is part of their world.


1

Ideas are not copyrightable. Having a character follow a philosophy is definitely not a form of plagiarism. Presenting that philosophy as a paraphrase of the original work might be plagiarism, though dubiously illegal (copyright on most of these works has long expired already anyway.) In most cases, if you just follow the idea but express it in your own way, ...


1

No, Dostoyevsky explored religious and existentialists ideas in many of his books--his genius was to add to the discussion by exploring existing ideas through fiction and finding new ground through the exploration.


1

You are worrying about the wrong thing. No one wants to steal your stuff. Unpublished fiction on the web is of zero commercial value. There are far more people writing it than there are reading it. The only people who should worry about being plagiarized are successful authors who are, first, making money, and, second, have a fanbase of people who admire ...


2

An "idea" is not copyrightable, only its expression is. "Bad faith" is an idea that is as old as time, that Satre "popularized," but did not invent. What is attributable to him is an exposition of what constitutes "bad faith (say a paragraph or longer). That would be copyrightable. That you would cite and attribute to him (and get permission to use). But ...


3

To my knowledge (not a lawyer), you don't have any legal responsibility to attribute the ideas in your actual text, unless you're directly quoting or paraphrasing. It's very rare (but not unheard of) to footnote a fictional text because it damages suspension of disbelief (except where the fiction is presented as if it were an academic work). Given that you ...


4

Footnotes and citations in fiction (and, in particular, children's fiction) are extremely rare, and I recommend against using them. It's often said that ideas are common; it's how they're used and implemented that matters. Nevertheless, fiction writers who feel they owe a debt to another writer's ideas usually say as much in an acknowledgements section. In ...


1

It's fine as long as you're acknowledging the philosopher (clearly or not). But if you don't want to add the quotation details (such as the originators) to too many other quotes, you could always make reference by adjusting your story to actual events that also happened to those philosophisers: such as one of your characters having a mystery reason to depart ...


0

I'm not a lawyer, but I'll point you in a direction you may want to go. What you are doing sounds like something called "parody." It turns out that "parody" is one of the so-called "fair use" defenses for copying. More to the point, John Adams is not alive to sue you, and no one else can, on his behalf. In your case, you should "make a virtue of necessity" ...


1

I am now going to try to answer this question based on what I've learned since our December exchange. I have "taste-tested" both books without reading through either. The styles are different enough that I'm going to assume that Stephen Fry didn't plagiarize any of Dumas book in the usual sense of "copying" one or more passages. There is a doctrine called "...



Top 50 recent answers are included