New answers tagged

1

If you make your story unique and different, it doesn't matter. Maybe you know "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins. The storyline is practly the same than "Battle Royale" by Coshun Takami. The idea of a group of people stucked in a place killing each other, is the same, but Susan Collins put her own style turning it into a TV show. Same story line, totally ...


2

It is very common for writers to come up with similar ideas—sometimes extraordinarily similar. In some cases, it comes about from two writers being influenced by the same previous works. I remember, when X-Files was popular, quite a few people independently came up with TV series ideas that were basically "X-Files for kids". Other times, the connections are ...


3

There are only a few basic storylines. Some say there are only seven basic plots in all fiction. What differentiates different works is the telling. If the telling of your work reminds people too strongly of the telling of another work it will seem derivative. But if the basic story structure does not resemble one of the story archetypes written into the ...


1

George Lucas wrote a Flash Gordon movie, but couldn’t get the rights to produce it. So he changed all the names of the characters and changed the title to Star Wars. So short answer: no, it doesn’t matter. Plagiarism is when you literally copy/paste pieces of someone else’s work into your own, not when your story belongs in the same section of the bookstore ...


0

Fictionalizing a philosophical/cultural concept isn't illegal, uncommon, or, in my opinion, unethical. Fictionalizing can actually help popularize a concept that might otherwise languish in obscurity. If you are fortunate to get published, you might ask to have an author's note included at the end of the book referencing the original article --I've seen ...


2

Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


0

I would add another consideration when you are considering translation: copyright laws. Somewhat inconveniently, these vary from one jurisdiction to the other, so you will need to check that out. You may need to obtain the copyright holder's permission to translate something, depending on the length of the passage and the reason you are using it. In some ...


4

You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...


0

Intellectual property transcends language.


3

Well as most of the answers imply here, you should simply "cite" whatever that is not yours. What I mean by this is you should basically include references to snippets that you did not write and ones that you took from other sources. As long as you include proper citations, then you're on the safe side. (This basically refers to the idea of including a ...


4

If you use someone else's ideas in an academic paper without giving them credit, that is plagiarism. If you have some hazy case and you're unsure, just give the original writer credit. It's easy to avoid committing plagiarism: just add a footnote. It's not that you can't use someone else's ideas. You just have to give the footnote. You don't need to give ...


1

For your first question: This "translation" would likely be plagiarism. In academics, most researchers have a way to write and express ideas, independently of their writing language. Someone reading your paper, who is knowledgeable in your field (so most colleagues in your field), is likely to find the link between your 'translated ideas' from the original, ...


4

You seem to be asking for permission to plagiarize. Don't. Cite all of your sources in your bibliography. It seems likely that your thesis advisor or chairperson explained this to you at some point. If you have more questions of this type, review the resources he or she gave you. Then, if it isn't covered, ask them in person.



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