Hot answers tagged

11

I own quite a few cook books full of mouthwatering images that contain recipes that do not work. So as a father who has to create tasty meals for a bunch of otherwise grumpy kids, I can only beg you to: Collect recipes from whereever you want. Cook them yourself, and then publish the instructions as you have found them to work. Because that is what I ...


7

I am not a lawyer. But it's my understanding that recipes, in their barest form, cannot be copyrighted, as they are a description of a method of accomplishing something. What IS copyrightable is the specific text that expresses those instructions, as well as any accompanying images, etc. There may be other aspects of the way the recipe is organized that is ...


4

There are only a few basic storylines. Some say there are only seven basic plots in all fiction. What differentiates different works is the telling. If the telling of your work reminds people too strongly of the telling of another work it will seem derivative. But if the basic story structure does not resemble one of the story archetypes written into the ...


4

If you use someone else's ideas in an academic paper without giving them credit, that is plagiarism. If you have some hazy case and you're unsure, just give the original writer credit. It's easy to avoid committing plagiarism: just add a footnote. It's not that you can't use someone else's ideas. You just have to give the footnote. You don't need to give ...


4

You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...


4

You seem to be asking for permission to plagiarize. Don't. Cite all of your sources in your bibliography. It seems likely that your thesis advisor or chairperson explained this to you at some point. If you have more questions of this type, review the resources he or she gave you. Then, if it isn't covered, ask them in person.


3

Having a competitor with a poor web interface is not justification for plagiarism. However, it's clear that you understand this. To build your own library of recipes, seek used cookbooks that are so old that copyright no longer applies. Used book stores and thrift shops are a good source for this, as are online bidding sites like eBay. The challenge with ...


3

If your book is dissimilar enough from Roth's that it does not remind readers of her series, there is no problem if you use the same name. Her's wasn't the first time that name has been used in fiction, either. If on the other hand you are writing a Young Adult dystopia where teens have to undergo life or death trials and fight the rulers, you might want to ...


3

Well as most of the answers imply here, you should simply "cite" whatever that is not yours. What I mean by this is you should basically include references to snippets that you did not write and ones that you took from other sources. As long as you include proper citations, then you're on the safe side. (This basically refers to the idea of including a ...


2

It is very common for writers to come up with similar ideas—sometimes extraordinarily similar. In some cases, it comes about from two writers being influenced by the same previous works. I remember, when X-Files was popular, quite a few people independently came up with TV series ideas that were basically "X-Files for kids". Other times, the connections are ...


2

Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


1

If you make your story unique and different, it doesn't matter. Maybe you know "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins. The storyline is practly the same than "Battle Royale" by Coshun Takami. The idea of a group of people stucked in a place killing each other, is the same, but Susan Collins put her own style turning it into a TV show. Same story line, totally ...


1

George Lucas wrote a Flash Gordon movie, but couldn’t get the rights to produce it. So he changed all the names of the characters and changed the title to Star Wars. So short answer: no, it doesn’t matter. Plagiarism is when you literally copy/paste pieces of someone else’s work into your own, not when your story belongs in the same section of the bookstore ...


1

For your first question: This "translation" would likely be plagiarism. In academics, most researchers have a way to write and express ideas, independently of their writing language. Someone reading your paper, who is knowledgeable in your field (so most colleagues in your field), is likely to find the link between your 'translated ideas' from the original, ...


1

First off, you're mixing two things: copyright violation and plagiarism. They are completely different. The point of copyright law is to protect the financial interests of the writer. If you copy someone else's work and sell it as your own, then you are costing the original author sales. Court cases on copyright center on whether the copied work would cost ...


1

This is purely my thoughts on this from a literary viewpoint, what I'm saying here could very well be legally wrong, I'm not a lawyer, and not even attempting a legal opinion While I think this is very strongly a legal question, ultimately you are using somebody else's work in a transformative way. I do think that because of the way that parody law works, ...


1

The best way to avoid plagiarising content is by avoiding plagiarising content. Now, as obvious as that probably sounds when stated like that, bear with me for a second before you hit the downvote arrow. This question really boils down to, do your texts really need to include the actual text of the cited work incorporated verbatim into your own text? My ...


1

I have never heard of the 5-word rule you describe, and I would find it hard to believe that anyone in a serious academic environment would abide by such a standard. Its interesting you bring this up, I recently launched a plagiarism detection software, and one of the most important things I built into it was the ability to detect sentences and phrases ...


1

I assume, because you have a direct competitor, that your recipes would be quite specialised, for example, focused on using peanuts or Indian. Having bought a large number of cookbooks over time, I tend now to focus on particular series or 'brands'. One series we have about ten of is the 'Australian Woman's Weekly' because the instructions are clear, the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible