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There are only a few basic storylines. Some say there are only seven basic plots in all fiction. What differentiates different works is the telling. If the telling of your work reminds people too strongly of the telling of another work it will seem derivative. But if the basic story structure does not resemble one of the story archetypes written into the ...


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You seem to be asking for permission to plagiarize. Don't. Cite all of your sources in your bibliography. It seems likely that your thesis advisor or chairperson explained this to you at some point. If you have more questions of this type, review the resources he or she gave you. Then, if it isn't covered, ask them in person.


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If you use someone else's ideas in an academic paper without giving them credit, that is plagiarism. If you have some hazy case and you're unsure, just give the original writer credit. It's easy to avoid committing plagiarism: just add a footnote. It's not that you can't use someone else's ideas. You just have to give the footnote. You don't need to give ...


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You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...


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I would suggest that you cite the original source, if you are researching ideas that others have done. If you write: This how to do X thing. Y method can be used, as shown [here]. then you are not claiming it as your own work. Anyone else can then access the original poster's website, from which you have done your own research, and will know that that ...


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One of the most important maxims in writing is “write what you know.” If you don’t know anything about handyman work, then don’t write about handyman work. You’re right, it will be hard to write anything original about handyman work if all of your knowledge about it is direct from a book with no practical experience or knowledge of the basics to draw on. ...


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We don't. It's a blurred line and a fortune in legal costs on arguing where it lies. Of course there is a classification, but the lines are always blurred. On the "white side" there's alluding - when you make your own characters, but draw specific parallels, exploring what-if's of the other work, mocking its shortcomings, or referencing its most brilliant ...


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Well as most of the answers imply here, you should simply "cite" whatever that is not yours. What I mean by this is you should basically include references to snippets that you did not write and ones that you took from other sources. As long as you include proper citations, then you're on the safe side. (This basically refers to the idea of including a ...


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First point, as Lauren Ipsum indicated, be very, very careful about taking a living person as your model. Taking a dead person as your model could also give you problems if that person was a writer (a category which could include people primarily famous for other reasons), and his or her writings are still in copyright. Whether this (putting in-copyright ...


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There are probably lots of names and titles that are coincidentally repeated in multiple books. To take a silly extreme, if someone tried to sue saying "He had a character in his book named John, and I have a character in my book named John. He's stealing my character name!", I can't imagine the courts would let that go very far. You can own a trademark in ...


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Within reason, if the name itself is not already instantly recognizable (Bart Simpson, Lara Croft, James Bond), you can probably get away with using it. "Trent Steele" may be generic enough. Similarly, there are only so many variants and arrangements of organization and darkness, so whatever you come up with has probably been used or alluded to elsewhere. ...


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It is very common for writers to come up with similar ideas—sometimes extraordinarily similar. In some cases, it comes about from two writers being influenced by the same previous works. I remember, when X-Files was popular, quite a few people independently came up with TV series ideas that were basically "X-Files for kids". Other times, the connections are ...


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Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on them,...


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If you live in America, the moment you write your first words for the story it is automatically protected under copyright law. It is quite insulting to professional publishers to think that they would want to steal your book. Honestly and integrity is the way publishers go if they want to make a good name for the company. It just isn't good businesses to ...


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TL;DR: There is a spectrum of copying from regular story-telling that re-uses ideas and themes, to plagiarism, to copyright infringement. These are not all the same and only the last is illegal. The concept of plagiarism is not clearly defined. There is a spectrum of idea-borrowing and word-for-word copying that exists and some of it is acceptable, but if ...


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If you make your story unique and different, it doesn't matter. Maybe you know "The Hunger Games" by Susan Collins. The storyline is practly the same than "Battle Royale" by Coshun Takami. The idea of a group of people stucked in a place killing each other, is the same, but Susan Collins put her own style turning it into a TV show. Same story line, totally ...


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If you're dealing with reputable publishers, they're not going to steal your idea. They just aren't. They wouldn't stay in business long if they did. If you're not sure whether a particular company is reputable, ask around.


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As far as I know, you can't really protect an 'idea' (otherwise every story would have to be unique). I'm not an expert when it comes to these things, but I can imagine that it's rather simple to take an existing story, change a few names and elements, so that it counts as 'new'. If you want to have a prove that you came up with it earlier (maybe to avoid ...


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George Lucas wrote a Flash Gordon movie, but couldn’t get the rights to produce it. So he changed all the names of the characters and changed the title to Star Wars. So short answer: no, it doesn’t matter. Plagiarism is when you literally copy/paste pieces of someone else’s work into your own, not when your story belongs in the same section of the bookstore ...


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For your first question: This "translation" would likely be plagiarism. In academics, most researchers have a way to write and express ideas, independently of their writing language. Someone reading your paper, who is knowledgeable in your field (so most colleagues in your field), is likely to find the link between your 'translated ideas' from the original, ...


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First off, you're mixing two things: copyright violation and plagiarism. They are completely different. The point of copyright law is to protect the financial interests of the writer. If you copy someone else's work and sell it as your own, then you are costing the original author sales. Court cases on copyright center on whether the copied work would cost ...


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This is purely my thoughts on this from a literary viewpoint, what I'm saying here could very well be legally wrong, I'm not a lawyer, and not even attempting a legal opinion While I think this is very strongly a legal question, ultimately you are using somebody else's work in a transformative way. I do think that because of the way that parody law works, ...


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The best way to avoid plagiarising content is by avoiding plagiarising content. Now, as obvious as that probably sounds when stated like that, bear with me for a second before you hit the downvote arrow. This question really boils down to, do your texts really need to include the actual text of the cited work incorporated verbatim into your own text? My ...


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I have never heard of the 5-word rule you describe, and I would find it hard to believe that anyone in a serious academic environment would abide by such a standard. Its interesting you bring this up, I recently launched a plagiarism detection software, and one of the most important things I built into it was the ability to detect sentences and phrases ...



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