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9

Myths and religions are "stories we already know." Adding references to known mythology in a contemporary story both grounds it to reality and connects it to our larger culture. Think about modern myths. If you have an ensemble action piece in a movie or a TV episode, for example, there's often a moment just before the climactic battle where five or six ...


5

I noticed you said "movie critics" enjoy mythological references in a film, but do audiences? So you've asked, kind of a two-part question. For clarity, there are films that are based on mythology, like "Star Wars" and there are films that reference mythology like "Prometheus." It can be a fine line, but I believe the difference lies with whether the ...


4

The term you are looking for is magical realism. This is when supernatural elements (magic, djinns, wishes, fae, dragons, elves, talking gargoyles, people with wings, meddling gods, spells, demons, and so forth) exist alongside what we consider the "real world," and everyone considers it normal. If this takes place in a contemporary setting, it's often ...


4

If you're starting to believe that honesty isn't always the best policy, or something similar in nature, keep going. Writing is just channeling thought onto paper. Really, essentially, you've thought about an aspect of your world at length and come to regard it differently. The fact that you happened to be writing at the time has no bearing on the truth of ...


4

The problem with taking a real-world believe system and implanting it in a fantasy world is that it greatly stretches the suspension of disbelieve when you use the same terms the real-world believe system is using. The terms are usually the result of cultural circumstances during the founding of the believe system. When your believe system is indeed ...


3

Because mythology is the oldest form of storytelling, it resonates with our deepest selves, allowing us to explore the inner archetypal landscape of being human and our connection to divinity. It is our common language.


3

One thing you seem to be forgetting regarding myths, is they are extremely prevalent stories. I prefer to avoid the word "good" because, honestly, some of them are rather crap as stories, but they are definitely memorable. Proof? They survived. Think about Shakespeare. He certainly wasn't the only writer of 16th century. More likely there were thousands of ...


3

Every art form --not just writing --has a body of theory that has developed around it in order to identify patterns. However, no art form can be wholly reduced to a set of rules, or otherwise machines could successfully create creative art. If you write in a state of nature, unaware of the theories, you may create some things that are entirely original and ...


3

Maybe you are seeing it from the wrong point of view. More than mythology, movies like Matrix and Prometheus deal with our current social values and believes. Neo, the technological messiah, is ready to die to save humanity but under a very actual agnostic - almost atheistic - point of view since he is more than human but not divine. He is machine made ...


2

A few quotes from Charlie Kaufman: "I don't know what the hell a third act is." From an interview about his film Synecdoche, New York. "I don't know what's going on there." You see, the tropes and rules are there. But you don't have to know about them or use them. And if you learn them, you can break their structure, to create something ...


2

Oh my! This is one of the coolest things I think you can do in writing! How can we make our stories set in the real world be like a fantasy? Paranormal event method Well, when it comes down to it, use real events - but slightly change them according to the powers of your characters. For example, you might write as though it was in a history book - the ...


1

I have a couple of ideas. Changes in scene and time. The simplest would be a geological event. In The Wizard of Oz, set in the Great Plains of the US, a tornado accomplished this. In your case, a sandstorm would suffice. Alternatively, you could enter a vortex in an otherwise normal setting such as in Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series propelling her main ...


1

Word of advice: don't put Mohammed into your story, unless you want to spend the rest of your life in hiding from extremists. So I'd stay away his time period. How about ancient Babylon instead? Then you can have Abraham, Job, jinns, magi, "god"-kings, various "gods", peasants, priests, craftsmen, traders, merchants, students, city folk in general, ...


1

Honestly, your comment reads as if every author has gone to use these tropes found on TVTropes, and that is a lie. Tropes are found similarities among stories, not some writer's guide to writing stories. Stop over-thinking it and enjoy writing. Nobody is caring, people love the book, movie, comic book, and many other fictional pieces of work for what the ...


1

Strange and Norrell: Have you ever read Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell? In the book, Strange and Norrell are magicians that seek to restore magic to England. Norrell believes in books and well-defined algorithms that can be put to work to solve every imaginable problem. He believes that magic is complete and all a magician should do is to ...


1

I think you misunderstand the point of tropes, conventions, and "rules". The central point is to be aware of them in order to either try and come up with something original (difficult), to know when you can break those rules, or to at least be aware of what has gone before in order to avoid being clich├ęd in your approach. As a previous answer noted, you're ...


1

Creative writing isn't inventing something new. It is writing in such a way as to keep your reader's attention.Writers aren't re-inventing the wheel. They are painting it a different color. If this isn't what you want it's because you aren't a writer.


1

I see no problem with this. There are many books that take a real world thought system and put it into a fictional universe. Think of samurai western movies, buddhist monks in space operas, meditation and yoga and all kinds of philosophical views in countless novels or films, and not to forget christian values reflected almost everywhere. Apart from the ...


1

Possible consequences: People get mad: Especially if the story gets popular. And the madness can come from unexpected directions. Good example is Harry Potter which is claimed to promote Satanism an Witchcraft by Christian community People will try to correct you: Especially in fiction book and if becomes popular. It is clear that you cannot describe the ...


1

The other answers are good, but there's a whole dimension that hasn't been addressed (except by @FBRogers who got his darn post in before I had a chance to write this ;) ). Myths were (and, to a large extent, still are) mankind's way of coming to terms with the nature of reality - especially the parts that deal with emotions, our inner nature, and things ...


1

There is an argument, I think, that we write what is inside of us - that is, we express into English some of our real, core beliefs. The effect of expressing our beliefs, writing them out, can - in both good and bad ways - make them more real, more concrete, and so can affect our thinking even more. However, it is always good to get them out into the open, ...



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