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6

Well, the simple answer is yes, if your story needs it you should switch POV as often as needed. Naturally of course it's more complicated then that. The point of view is are windows into the story, we see it through those eyes and learn all that happens via it. If the story is small, where one character can see and interact with most events, it makes sense ...


6

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card did something like this, although they weren't quite integral to the plot. The entire story was told from Ender's point of view, but the beginning of each chapter had a radio transmission or other news-type broadcast that was talking about the current events in the rest of the world, outside his secluded space station. But ...


6

Have you ever read Trainspotting? That, IMO, is an example of tons of perspective changes executed perfectly. Really though it depends on the kind of story you're trying to tell, because lots of perspective changes definitely changes the tone. A more nonlinear story favors perspective changes, for example. Also, don't assume you're going to be losing ...


5

No, I love it. I think it's great. The narrator is sort of echoing the perspective of the the person being observed, and you're absolutely right that the two characters see things differently and speak differently. Having a different narrative "voice" for the two of them is a subtle way of showing the reader their worldviews before they even open their ...


4

There are obvious times when it should be done, for instance, when you have more than one main character. Asking, should it ever be done at all (current question title) is more subjective than answerable since published authors do it effectively on a regular basis. Taking a shot at summarizing your last paragraph into one question, "How can I lock character ...


4

An idea: instead of re-hashing the same scene(s) from different viewpoints, let them feed progressively off each other. A real-time description of an event can use something inherent to the event itself that moves on and touches on each involved character: a simplistic example: a rolling wheel from an accident - a character involved in the accident sees the ...


4

The shortest poems are lighght and by Aram Saroyan.


4

Keep it plausible. The way your characters act in your universe must be authentic. Otherwise you jerk your readers out of the story. What is authentic depends on your setting. Two examples: When Little John is just a fellow, helping the main character, because he is a good fighter, then it could go like that: "Hey, Little ..." Darn. He still forgot to ...


4

Personally I wouldn't change from first to third person in the middle of the story, it's always a little bit jarring for the reader. That being said, maybe being jarring is what you want in this case. It would make the flashbacks stand out. Being in first person for the flashback would also make it feel more personal, something you might want for that ...


3

In my opinion, writing with a omniscient 3rd person character is the most difficult exercice. Since you're seem to be able to write as 1st person, I think this exercice can help you. First, try to write a scene, discussion or anything else, between at least two character with the perspective of each character to have the point of view from each ...


3

David Eddings does this in the Belgariad pentology. Main character Garion is introduced to a man whom his Aunt Pol calls "Old Wolf," and Garion decides to call him "Mister Wolf." Mister Wolf later announces to other characters, "This is what Garion is calling me, and I happen to like it, so that's what you'll be calling me for now." All the attributives and ...


3

The issue here is that you want to avoid an identity disconnect between the reader and this character. If the reader is connecting to this character only through their name, then this is not only a problem of identification but also one of a lack of style and characterization. You have a couple of ways to avoid this: Characterization: If this character is ...


3

If your issue is that you want to improve your writing when you are not writing about a personal crisis, you need to work on strengthening your imagination. You may be finding it easier to transcribe a trauma because the feelings are in your head, very alive and immediate. That's exhausting, however, and not necessarily appealing to your readers. Good ...


3

A few main points are: First person - you (the reader) have a closer relationship with the character. You are more likely to feel what they feel. (I guess :P) Second person - you are in the story, used commonly in the "pick your path" stories because it is YOU in the sticky situation, so YOU must pick the path. Third person - Gives a larger view of what ...


2

I find it fascinating when a story swaps between 3rd and 1st person. In 3rd person it is a mainly Objective writing. When 1st person, it becomes an extremely subjective writing. It brings along the facts, as well as letting you feel the characters emotions. In the first person chapters, you get shocked when the character does. In the third person ...


2

From your question, I would suggest that your best next step is to do a lot of reading. Find books and stories that are in the genre you are interested in, and read, read, read. When you feel that a particular story is effective, has an emotional impact, has characters that come to life in your mind, read it again. In your second round, though, don't read ...


2

George R.R. Martin's A Song of Ice and Fire, aka Game of Thrones, is the biggest current example. Three dozen? perspectives and counting. Introduces a new world with a huge political social conflict. Pretty much the textbook for what you're doing.


2

Just don't fall into the trap of multiple perspectives and tenses for multiple perspectives' and tenses' sake. In the hands of a good writer with a concrete vision, these are effective techniques. Otherwise if your vision isn't concrete, probably best to channel some Strunk and White and focus on simple, serviceable writing that tells a story. 2nd-person ...


2

Unlike a work of prose, which has a generally accepted predefined length (be it a short story, novella, novel, etc.) poetry is not governed by such precepts. Poetry is akin to art. A white canvas with a single stroke of paint on it can be a painting, if that is the intention of its creator. A poem can be any number of words, or just one, or even one letter, ...


2

Since asking the question, I stumbled across another single-letter poem. Poem I was skeptical about accepting such poems as true poems, but this is a rather neat one I have to say: Critique The letter i with the author's own unique thumbprint to complete it. The thumbprint is the most meaningful symbol that can express the meaning of the object it ...


1

I know. So go. Doesn't that qualify? It rhymes, keeps a meter, and "says" more than it says. That's pretty much my definition of poetry. Not saying it's any good, though. Even more minimal: Hi. Bye. (Wow, that's soooo deep. The minimalism powerfully evokes the impoverishment of social interactions in a technological society, ...


1

Most people suck at writing omniscient 3rd person, because it’s like writing poetry in free verse: without a structure that provides some boundaries on what you can say, there is a greater risk that your story will turn into the narrative equivalent of a slime mold, smeared out randomly across the page without a skeleton to guide it. If, for example, a plot ...


1

You may not "suck" at all at third-person. I'd suggest that the problem is that the story you're penning isn't well-suited to a third person narrative. You've actually already discovered that as you've found that first person works much better for the tale. A major strength of a third-person omniscient point of view is it can reveal anything and everything ...


1

No concrete examples are coming to mind at the moment, but just thinking about it leads me to believe it's best to stick with the character's nickname. But this assertion is circumstantial: you say the main character has started to use this fellow's real name; I ask you why? If someone is going by Nicky the whole time and then dramatically reveals their ...


1

Have you considered doing away with chapters? See my more recent question about chapters, or rather the lack thereof. That way, you at least don't have to worry about "short chapters" anymore.



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