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6

Completely eliminate? No. In general, prefer active voice unless you have a specific reason to use passive. Some reasons to use passive voice: You don't know who did the action. I was carjacked on February 19, 1999. (True story.) You wish to hide or deemphasize responsibility the action. The person who did it is not important to the sentence at hand. You ...


6

The passive voice is a grammatical tool, and like any tool it can be overused. However, passive voice does have legitimate uses; there are times it makes sense to use it. This is particularly the case in fiction and personal essays, where mood is important and economy of phrasing can contribute to pacing. Casting absolutely everything into the active voice ...


3

Active and passive voice are tools, like a hammer and a drill. It's less a question of using one "too much" and more a matter of when each tool is appropriate for the rhetorical situation (ie, your audience, your topic, your purpose). Basically, you can carpenter your writing together with nails or with screws, but the results will be different, as will the ...


3

The use of active or passive voice is dictated by where your focus is: on the subject or object of the actiin. Who is your sentence/paragraph/chapter about? John or Bob? If it is about John and what he does, use the active voice: John killed Bob. If it is about Bob and what he experiences, use the passive voice: Bob had been killed by John. ...


3

"X was most likely to be electrocuted" doesn't have an actor, so that's fine as is. But if you have "many new things were done," tell us by whom, and what they did. While the 15x15 was pregnant, the three-bys were busy building houses, the 9x9s dug latrines, and the lone Whip-It sat in the makeshift cage, wondering when his sentence would be carried ...



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