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22

Am I allowed to beat the drum for Scrivener again? :) Scrivener is a tremendously flexible writing program which allows you to rearrange your items easily, by dragging around icons, by putting up virtual cards on a corkboard, or setting things up in outline format (the Outline view is right in the top bar). Each item of your outline is a document, which ...


9

If you can't boil down your novel into a logline (or "elevator pitch," which is how I learned it), then you may actually have a problem with your novel. You've provided the structure of your answer in your own question. An elevator pitch must have: the protagonist the goal of the protagonist the antagonist the stakes of failure So pick those out of your ...


6

It all depends on what you want on those cards. Since I tend to worry about the details of a scenario when I'm writing it specifically, I tend to be pretty rough when I plan like this, but I recommend four basic elements be on all of your notecards: What characters are there. Why they're there. What happens to them. How this affects the characters and the ...


5

If it makes sense, by all means put text there. It’s not strange at all. Neither is not having text there and just starting a subsection immediately.


4

A and B meet. A and B fall in love. Optional: A and B enjoy snugglebunnies. Obstacle gets between A and B. A and/or B overcome obstacle. Omnia vincit amor. (since it was requested that I turn this into an answer)


3

It is best to do what works best for you (and you will have to try). People (and writers) are different, and what works for one need not work for another. If you find that what you write without plan is reasonably well structured and without disabling plot holes that make rewriting and cleaning up a nightmare there is no reason why you should insert an ...


3

Outlines vary in how much text they cover; some people might write a multi-page outline for the same content for which another would write: Boy meets girl. Boy loses girl. Boy goes to mad-scientist school and builds a new girl. So the only way to know how your outlines map to word count is to take samples. Compare your previous outlines to word ...


3

Seems like step 2 of the 3-step method of coming up with the title. First step: you compress the story into a half-page summary, that catches the essentials, piques interests, and so on. You condense events from the chapters into single sentences, cull unnecessary fluff, replace revelations with mysteries, spoilers with questions. That way you obtain the ...


3

To answer the question in your title: yes! The question that I don't see asked is how long is your essay supposed to be? Is there a word limitation or expectation? If so, then that will influence the length of your essay and help dictate how much you need in your outline. As for the outline itself, I believe you have a very good working start. I like the ...


3

I use an extensive array of index cards. The core thing I learned about index cards is make sure you know what information you want to put on them before use and ask yourself before pulling out a fresh index card will a new card help to better organize my work, or will it obfuscate my process and clutter up my desk? Don't take clutter lightly. To much of a ...


3

I use mind mapping software (Freemind, Freeplane) to organize all of my writing projects. Blocks of text can be imported and then moved around as needed. You get a visual representation of your outline, as well as quick access to any part of your content. Areas that are completed, need content, or are under review are easy to mark with visual icons. When ...


3

For each scene, I like to note: The POV character Goal: What the POV character wants in this scene. Obstacle: Who or what gets in the way of the POV character's goal. Result: Whether or not the POV character achieves the goal. If the character has a significant dilemma (more than a paragraph) in response to something that happens in the scene, I'll note: ...


2

I can highly recommend Circus Ponies Notebook. It uses the notebook metaphor and it has a page type that gives you an outliner. You can easily integrate media files as well. I use it for fictional and non-fictional writing, then put my outliner next to Scrivener to write it down (CPN has the advantage of optional checkboxes for each cell, so you always know ...


2

After you write your first draft, you will see from actual use what terms are dependent on other terms. That will allow you to reorder your definitions and put the ones you need first in front. You're allowed to vary from your outline, and you're allowed to revise your outline. If you wrote a paper as you outlined it above and then realized that Cost and ...


2

Questions about "what to write about" are off-topic. But your question can be also interpreted as "how to start a novel" and so I'm going to answer that one. First a misconception on your side: I know nothing about writing. This sentence is only excusable as a citation. But your name is not John Snow. So forget about it, because writing this question ...


2

While loglines (or log lines) serve as "elevator pitch" once you have finished your screenplay or novel, some authors, like Blake Snyder in Save the Cat! recommend that you come up with your log line before you embark on the journey of writing, because like the premise it will serve as orientation whether you are still on track. A logline must be: one to ...


2

If you feel like the section needs an introduction, go ahead and put a little text there. If the heading is comprehensible on its own, then don't bother. Example: 1.1 has introductory text; 1.2 does not. 1. Star Trek Star Trek was a television show which originally aired from 1966 to 1969. It struggled in the ratings and was eventually canceled despite a ...


2

I'd guess the deadline pressure is blanking your mind. What I would do is this: You have everything in your mind. So stop thinking on it. It's time to live the story. Pick any scene or character or phrase that you feel anything about and take a day to write down the whole story from there. Allow yourself to daydream your tale and explore what it means for ...


1

An outline or summary is planning. As is character profiles, event lists, setting notes, language notes, maps, roleplaying, and anything else you do understand the story before you write it. How much planning is needed varies from none at all to months of planning for hours of writing. Some factors that affect how much planning is needed are length, ...


1

There are two approaches available to you: Write everything you know and be happy with the length. There is value in concise accurate summaries. Learn more. the joke is that experts keep learning more and more about less and less until they know absolutely everything about absolutely nothing. There is a core truth here. I could without much effort write a ...


1

Apples own Numbers app is what you looking for, it's excel injected with desktop publishing steroids. Else there is omnioutliner one of the best there is for this exact requirement...


1

Developing a book or a screenplay both begin in much the same way: plot and characters. The formatting and presentation of both once written couldn't be more different. Books are usually written in paragraphs and chapters, where screenplays adhere to strict formatting rules and are always in present tense. There's no right or wrong way to start writing a ...


1

If your needs are basic: 1) low cost 2) collection of documents 3) links between them Then it sounds like simple HTML files could do the trick. But if you want more, you could consider storing documents in something like Google Docs. You can add links to other Google docs within a document and Google Docs keeps track of revisions made. It also has basic ...


1

I use Aeon Timeline to keep track of chronology (it integrates well with Scrivener, which I use for writing), and I do everythong else on paper. Maybe this is because I did my first writing projects before the advent of the personal computer and had to type my first essays for university on a typewriter. To me, paper outlining has one gigantic advantage: ...


1

I spend a lot of time in Tinderbox ( http://www.eastgate.com/Tinderbox/ ) It is a great tool for harvesting information, putting down ideas or any kind of notes. Then, as need arises, to structure this information, discover new relationships and patterns, and finally export it to text or html. It is great for taking notes at lectures and rework them later ...


1

I have been doing a lot of my outlining/pre-writing work in Workflowy. It is technically a TODO app, but I like the bulleted and nested lists for outlining and refining. I sometimes write entire papers within Workflowy, using the nested zoom to refine and re-structure sections and paragraphs. You can export (via copy-paste) to other writing apps (msword, ...


1

Not enough points to add to Lauren Ipsum's answer, but I really do like Scrivener. It takes some time to get your head around, really. As you're calibrating to it, it can at first seem too simplistic, or overly complex, but it's really a whole bag of amazing. Not only will Scrivener allow you to outline and rearrange, but it also lets you store reference ...



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