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2

Unless you already have a completed manuscript, you are putting the cart before the horse. If you intend to use an agent, you'll need to see what that agent requires, which is usually a query--outline, sample chapter, synopsis, and so on. Most agents (and publishers) no longer need or want the manuscript in paper format. Each has differing requirements ...


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Since you can't please everybody, you might as well please yourself. Write the book that you would like to read. Life itself is a series of cliffhangers, isn't it? Picture that friend or relative who would love reading a book like yours, then picture him turning the last page and it's a cliffhanger. What will he say to you? But overall, write the book that ...


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One of most important aspects of a good story - I'd say about the most important of all - is the aftertaste. It's the feeling left after finishing the story. Satisfying or disturbing, puzzling, leaving us thoughtful - that's all achieved by closures, by finishing various threads in various ways. Some stories are open-ended. It could be said they end where ...


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The whole trilogy fad started with the Lord of the Rings being published in three volumes instead of one as its author intended, because of post war paper shortage and to keep down the price (of one single "book"). A trilogy in this original sense is one book that is so long that publishing it in one volume is impractical. Its story runs smoothly through ...


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I have seen some books that talk about a related idea. Stanley D. Williams's The Moral Premise focuses more heavily on what life lesson the story illustrates. Williams doesn't necessarily encourage starting with the moral premise in mind. That can lead to a pitfall that I'll say more about below. Sandra Scofield has a very nice, short audio workshop about ...


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More than likely you will alienate whatever readers did pick up your book. They PAID to buy your story, and you did not provide them with a complete story. A Series does not mean each story segment is left unfinished. If it is made clear up front your Trilogy is an ongoing SERIAL which requires all three books to reach the conclusion, you might get by with ...


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Unless readers know they've picked up a trilogy or a book in a story arc, most will find a cliffhanger ending unsatisfying and wonder why the author didn't finish the story. As most television show episodes, motion pictures, novels and short stories have a clear beginning-middle-end, readers have become accustomed to tales that follow such a plot line. If ...


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Write it the way you feel it should be written. However, I would then finish the entire trilogy before finding an agent and shopping it to publishers or publishing it yourself. That way you can either promise your self-pub readers that the next two books are coming, or let your agent pitch that it's a finished trilogy. (I can't see a publisher taking on ...


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It's much easier to do in French than English, but it's possible. There is no "method" for doing so, though. In fact, you can do this with almost any part of speech. Language is weird. For example, "Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo" is a grammatically correct sentence in English--but really, who the fu*k would ever want to ...


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To develop story for any novel, first you need to have a start and an end points. Now the whole story and the characters in it will be moving according to this final goal point. You can add as many characters as you want but one condition they need to support your story and shouldn’t go beyond your perception of the story because this will confuse the ...


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To answer your second question, an example of how the writing flows is given on the French Wikipedia page: Quelle aubaine! Une place de libre, ou presque, dans ce compartiment. Une escale provisoire, pourquoi pas! Donc, ma nouvelle adresse dans ce train de nulle part: voiture 12, 3e compartiment dans le sens de la marche. Encore une fois, pourquoi pas? ...


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Le Train de Nulle Part (The Train from Nowhere) It's a gimmick. Nothing more. Oh sure, he gets all high and mighty about it, but even in his explanation of why he did it he breaks his own rule about never using verbs. From the Wikipedia page: Thaler surmised, "The verb is like a weed in a field of flowers. You have to get rid of it to allow the ...


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Word count matters. Here are some posts about what word counts are acceptable for which genre and age group: http://literaticat.blogspot.ca/2011/05/wordcount-dracula.html http://www.literaryrejections.com/word-count/ http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/word-count-for-novels-and-childrens-books-the-definitive-post New ...


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Don't worry about the number of pages, that is dependent on the way the eventual book is typeset. The question you want to ask, as the writer, is "do I have too many words (or too few) for the amount of story I have written." It's perfectly possible to use too many words to tell too little story, or too few words to tell too much, but the number of pages ...



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