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The US Census bureau reports that 126,601 Americans are employed full time as "writers and authors", and they have a median income of $58,150. http://www.census.gov/people/io/ That's way more people and way more money than I would have guessed. They don't define "writers and authors" nor do they break it down into categories. This probably includes many ...


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Many people do make a living as novelists, but it's a very small percentage of the people who write. To offer some personal perspective, over the course of nearly 20 years writing, I've produced one traditionally published book (a picture book). It was well-reviewed, reasonably successful and went through more than one printing. Over the lifetime of the ...


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Artists starve. They hold food service jobs part time, or the like, and devote themselves. Or they have alternative forms of income or a supportive spouse or savings. To try to give yourself a reasonable target, taking into account the time it takes to publish and see an income from an accepted manuscript, six years (a number out of my behind) is my ...


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The way i found out was just writing the first chapter. This is my first pattern. After, you will look furthermore things, like the paragraph size itself, its pace, their communication... You'll probably get some huge chapther forward, but will find ways to break on two.


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Is it possible to make a living as a novelist? Yes, a few people do. Is it sensible to plan on making a living as a novelist, the way you might plan on making a living as a dentist or an accountant? Absolutely not. Very few of those who try ever make even pocket money from writing fiction. A realistic approach is to plan on making you living doing ...


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You summarize the problem very well when you said: "I can barely get maybe ten or fifteen thousand words in before I completely lose all interest." I really hope you'll reconsider the difficulty you are going through and see that it isn't something wrong with you, but is a very common challenge among most (if not all) authors. Most Common Problem ...


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Looks like you are off the old hyper-focus. ADHD makes it impossible to proceed with anything unless extreme interest breaks through the barrier and produces an immense ability to focus, far beyond regular levels. If at first you could, and now you cannot, you have sunk below the threshold. The challenge is, how to get it back. Maybe it is just a phase. ...


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(I'm going to come at this from a writer perspective, not an ADD/ADHD perspective.) Depends on what kind of writer you are. It's possible you just haven't found the story for you yet. You haven't found the one that really captivates your attention and makes you want to push through. So you may just want to keep trying out books until one keeps you. Unless ...


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I think that if you want to write more, getting back on those meds will be easier; I found these tips for when your on Adderall: Eat essential amino acids, glycemic carbohydrates and healthy fats Exercise is known to release certain hormones that relieve you (but do it as a general activity) Rest for 8 hours


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If you are proud of the work, you needn't be concerned. I wouldn't draw attention to it if it wasn't a professional sale or if it isn't related to the work you are doing now, but otherwise? I really wouldn't worry about it. If you want to use any of the stories or concepts, however, you might want to pull those works down. When you're querying agents and ...


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There's no reason not to include it. It will display the fact that your protagonist does not exist inside a vacuum. Whilst her personal story progresses, so does everyone's, and the effects of this will be seen through the eyes of your protagonist. It will help to flesh out the characters you have created, and make the world more believable. The issue is ...


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The various parts of a novel may be tied together in different ways. They may be connected by the threads of plot. But equally they may be thematically related to each other, or provide thematic counterpoint to each other. The wholeness and integrity of a novel depends on the wholeness and integrity of its effect of the reader. If the subplots intersect ...


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Sure, no problem at all. Just make sure to let the reader know as fast as possible, as they'd have to do some backtracking in their minds if they thought the chapter started with the same characters from the previous chapter. Start by immediately making the change clear, and you should be fine. In fact, i find it even more interesting to change point of ...


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Yes, you can. You just want it to be clear to the reader, be consistent throughout the chapter. Be careful with how many points of view you use throughout your book, as you can end up overwhelming your readers. I had a few readers bring them up in one of my books once. Having a few points of view, and making them definitive and unique can really add to the ...


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Yes, you can change the character and setting on a different chapter J.K Rowling changed her narratives in the beginning of 'The Goblet Of Fire' and frequently in ,Order Of The Phoenix'. Describe their feelings and sensory thoughts in your third person


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You could put her in a situation that forces her to relive her past. That definitely would make her your main character as not only is she confronted with her past but she must do so with something she must deal with in the present.


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Dialogue and monologue. Dialogue with her friends, one by one, until they leave. With a bartender or barista. On a chat room or a BBS. Monologue could be writing in a diary or a blog. Or potentially she monologues at her cat, who will look interested only until she's fed. Whoever the audience is, have the character say out loud the things she's thinking ...


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One key thing you can do is to have your character fight against their own anger, instead of luxuriating in it. If she's really doing her best to move on, but having trouble --well, most of us can identify with that. You also don't have to have all the back story come out at once, and you might want to simplify it. If one detail or another has a real and ...


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Being filled with regret does not necessarilly make your character pathetic. If what she is regretful about is truly horrible and self-damning, then that regret may be an appropriate response to the loss. It only becomes pathetic in the eyes of your readers, when what has been lost and is now sorrowfully missed, was never real or really valuable in the ...


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I suggest a popular literary technique called 'indirect characterisation' If your writing in first person; write about her thoughts and reasons and actions. If she is approached by someone who speaks and she reveals how that person has affected her ,good or bad. If in second person you may start a chapter revealing that she had suffered a breakdown and is ...



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