New answers tagged

1

The subdivisions of a chapter, signified by an asterism (⁂), dinkus (* * *), or extra space, are called sections.


1

I recently watch 7 editors choose stories for anthologies. They had read all of the stories a month or two earlier, and were now considering them in front of a live audience. Every now and then, an editor would pick up a manuscript from the pile, read the title out loud to the audience, and say, "I have no memory of this. Give me a minute..." Then they'd ...


0

When I am Writing my titles I make a list of what I think is most important about the story. Then what I do is I reread parts of it. then I brainstorm and write words that come to me, about and from the book. I will read them then try and make a something that sums up the book. For instance, I wrote a story about a well that holds all the memories of the ...


0

Antagonists and villains (which are not identical) do things for the same reasons that protagonists and heroes (which are not identical) do. They have the same motivations. Antagonists and villains feel like they are the protagonists and heroes of their own stories. In the case of real historical persons and real historical conflicts used in fiction, ...


2

1) What I like to do is go to a book store and look at the titles in the genre I am writing in. If you do that, you will notice that books from the same genre often have titles that are similarly structured. For example, thrillers have short one or two word titles that relate to things hard, cold and dangerous. YA SF also has one word titles, but these ...


0

There are two ways to approach this: marketing artistic Though they aren't necessarily mutually exclusive, an excessively obscure title might be risky in terms of the former (although, it might also help; you never know). My advice is to ignore any marketing concerns and focus on art. A title must be: indicative of the book in question (can you ...


3

In a novel it is conventional to start a new paragraph when you change: -- speaker (yes, every time) -- place -- time -- character -- topic You can change the 'meaning' of your text just by where you choose to place a new paragraph.


2

You have already selected an answer; however, as you mentioned your book has a lot of flow to it. I'm sure you know, conventionally novels have some form of paragraph structure. You may want to think about forgoing them altogether or deliberately formulating a structure that fits your piece of writing. Consider, On The Road - by Jack Kerouac, it was first ...


3

Like all rules, only break it if you understand why it works, and you're breaking it deliberately to create an effect. Paragraphs break up the copy into more digestible chunks and make it easier to read. A paragraph can have one to a few thoughts in it, or one thought can be spread over multiple paragraphs. If you don't use paragraphs, what you're writing ...


1

Well, this is an issue perhaps related to whatever software you're using, though for the life of me, I can't imagine what that may be (everything should be standardized). Of course your question "Do I need to make use of paragraphs" confuses me - it's a question I would not expect from someone writing anything, let alone a novel. FWIW: Text on the left ...


-1

I have read good novels without dialogue, and most with. As one poster said, writing about past events makes dialogue seem stilted. I agree. So, it's not necessary, there is none in 1984 as far as I remember, but dialogue is fun and essential in many novels. Don't worry about padding. That's for the editing stage.


0

2 books deals are not common; better develop the present book into a trilogy. Each book should be 80-100K words. I know you are almost done, but you can add various subplots to lengthen the story. For now, only concentrate on the first book, find an end point, weave in subplots and flesh it. Only after polishing and publishing, continue developing books 2 ...


3

It probably is, but what you can do instead is rework it as two books, and then when shopping for an agent, present it as book-plus-sequel. Science fiction (and fantasy) in particular are forgiving of long works and love series, so length and sequel would be features, not bugs.


1

Think about the ending, write it down. How and what will the characters do to get to the ending? Start in small steps; first figure out the name of the main POV, and gender. What does this character do? In a fantasy are the characters just a thief, mage, dragon, knight? Do these jobs define and limit them? Or are they more than a title? Same with other ...



Top 50 recent answers are included