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2 books deals are not common; better develop the present book into a trilogy. Each book should be 80-100K words. I know you are almost done, but you can add various subplots to lengthen the story. For now, only concentrate on the first book, find an end point, weave in subplots and flesh it. Only after polishing and publishing, continue developing books 2 ...


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It probably is, but what you can do instead is rework it as two books, and then when shopping for an agent, present it as book-plus-sequel. Science fiction (and fantasy) in particular are forgiving of long works and love series, so length and sequel would be features, not bugs.


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Think about the ending, write it down. How and what will the characters do to get to the ending? Start in small steps; first figure out the name of the main pov, and gender. What does this charicter do? Say in a——fantasy are the characters just a thief, mage, dragon, knight? Do these jobs define and limit them? Or are they more then a title? Same with ...


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What is your story purpose for giving the machine POV? Why does the reader need to get inside the machine's "head?" If you want to show the machine's limitations, it can be done with a POV human struggling to get the machine to understand. Now if you intend for the machine to make an important mistake at some point, then I can see using the machine's POV.


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First of all, every main character in the history of the world has to change in a certain way. That's how you know your character has grown. Whether it be coming out of their shell, growing up, or learning new things, your character has to change and learn something at the end of any story. Now, your character can't just change. There has to be buildup, ...


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You don't need to overthink this. Readers will accept whatever reality you present to them so long as it is consistent. Just create a set of rules for the robot's AI then write the character as you would for a human. For example: It can only use 100 basic words and key phrases. It will only process the world as raw data. It doesn't see colors or humans; ...


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Write it as data inputs and responses. INPUT: USER 1 enters room RESPOND Y/N? Y OUTPUT_$content: {greeting}; {Salutation: 'Good'} {TOD: 1415, 'afteroon'}; INPUT: USER 1 response {"Good afternoon yourself. Did you finish compiling that report?"} SEARCH_DB6b.46: report {SMITH, CHARLES: activities prior 72 hours}; LOCATED COMPLETE Y/N? N ET COMPLETION: 4.7 ...


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A few possibile viewpoints: An omniscient narrator who describes what the machine does and says. One of the nearby sentient beings, when any are available to observe the machine's important actions or communications. Reports from someone who pieces together the machine's communications and actions from available evidence after the fact.


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I like that they're not romantic interests. It seems to always be romantic these days. In modern movies, and a bunch of YA books, it's often mandatory that they fall in love/have sex/sexual tension. It's like, a law or something of stories these days. But you DON'T. The sheer number of stories that have the woman be the romantic interest is just ...


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To me, your question sounds, as if you have trouble showing the gradual development of your character. A good discussion of how to provide well-rounded characters arcs is provided, for example, in Chris Vogler's The Writer's Journey: This was the most helpful book I've ever read about storytelling. It adresses the very essence of what a story is and how ...


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I think the previous answers are better than what I am about to tell you but if it was me writing it I'd give my character a REASON to stop running. I would have my character witness something so horrible s/he would realize that there is no running,that they personally would have to do something about it for the sake of others (or even just him/herself) s/he ...


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First of all, your protagonist almost must change, or there's not much point to your book. If s/he does not at some point stop running and pull him/herself together, your reader will feel like the book is a waste of time. To make it seem not rushed or fake, you need two things: sufficient buildup before the epiphany to give enough space to the epiphany ...


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What do you think the reader will expect? I don't think that when reading your novel, they will think: "Well, he is going to be scared the rest of the novel, he will never do anything, the end." I think, that by creating the conflict, and the scared protagonist, the readers will expect him to not be scared at some point, and do something about the conflict. ...


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In short, it depends on how feminine you want your character to be. The average man will not "blink back tears" often and usually tend towards anger or another irrational emotion instead. Washing tears away is okay, if he gets angry afterward. A more masculine character would lead towards anger of discovering an affair then sadness. In other words, crying ...


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I was going to add this as a comment, as it involves responding to another comment you have made on the answer of @Snarkeet, but it ended up being quite long, so I'll try to flesh it out into a proper answer. You should not be surprised that your female beta reader understands less how a male character would act when they're alone. You can't expect a female ...


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Honestly, haven't we already had more than enough macho, tough-guy characters who are too strong and silent to express their emotions? In my opinion, that kind of character has become a cliche. Men in fiction are emotionally stunted and are only allowed to show aggression and pride. They can get mad, they can break things, they can hit people, but they can't ...


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I believe there are actual physiological reasons (related to hormones?) that adult men are less likely to cry. I'm far from a "tough guy" but I've personally found it more difficult and rare to experience tears as I grow older. We also can't discount social and cultural pressures against male tears that are stricter in some cultures and sub-cultures than ...


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A man crying is not unrealistic. From what you've stated here, there are two emotional stressors acting on him: the rejection from the woman he's in love with and the discovery that his dead wife cheated on him. Find more beta readers. Seriously. This level of emotion is reasonable, given the character's temperament and what's happened. Now, that being ...


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If he is a sensitive man, then writing about him crying will convey that to the reader. And yeah, even a less sensitive man might cry when he discovers that his former wife was carrying on an affair. You could ask other male test readers besides that one. If you ask several, you're more likely to get a well rounded opinion than just asking one person.



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