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I grew up in London and live within commuting distance. These are just my impressions - I haven't done a survey! Between spouses or couples I would say the most common pet names used in London and the surrounding area are "Darling" and "Love". "Love" is more working class, "Darling" more middle class. However there is a lot of overlap. Both terms could be ...


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75000 word to 100000 for most novels. Fantasy is about 85000 to 125000 words. I would say aim towards the 125000 for your first daft. Then on tour second edit try to cut 5000 word from each part if you have 3 parts to your story. So example first edit I have over 40000 words or 160 pages. Then I would try to cut 20 pages from that. So by the second edit you ...


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(a) You certainly don't want to aggravate your publisher. It is perfectly fine to ask them if you can keep the UK style, but if they decline I would not "insist", as you plan to do, but defer to their greater experience. I would ask them to explain their reasons, because I want to learn something, but I certainly wouldn't argue about it. (b) It's only ...


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Firstly, congratulations on landing a publisher! That's one of the hardest steps. That being said, if this is your first novel (even if not), it's probably best to go with what your publisher wants. If your novel will be published in the US, then it's general practice to have a version with the US standard of style. You can keep the UK style for the UK ...


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Terms of endearment are, by their very nature, quite individual. You may want one that is common and doesn't draw attention to itself. In that case go for something like 'darling'. However, if you want to give your character uniqueness, have them use individual terms, such as 'lotus blossom'. Pick something that will reveal something about him or her. You ...


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Try looking up "British terms of endearment" instead. You should find several links. This one looks good in particular.


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Echoing what Dale said, politics will alienate your readers. However, if your political statement (that you wish to address in the author's note) is central to the book, then the book description should do enough to deter readers who would be put off by the note. You mentioned that it will be at the back of the book (which is where I've seen most author's ...


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What Dale said. And: I think that your novel should contain a short, biographical author's note including the URL of your webpage. On your webpage you can have either a page dedicated to your political views, or a blog where, besides other writerly blog posts, you voice your political opinion. I would keep the book as the book and not water it down with ...


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Having use a stockwhip (similar to a bull whip) quite a bit when I was younger and having watched people cut cigarettes held in the mouth in half, etc. I really don't think you could fight with one. They are too slow to use, distance between you and the target can't vary greatly, and they don't do that much damage. Yes, you can cut someone with one, but not ...


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Politics will limit your audience. If your novel is highly political, your author's note will fit right in. The author's note may even be a draw for people who agree with the politics. A political author's note up front will annoy many readers. Annoyed readers may close the book and not open it again. They may be annoyed with themselves for having spent ...


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I wanted to add a comment to what's answer, but it ended up being too long. I entirely agree that you need to have some real experience with someone using it, either using one yourself or watching videos of people extensively. In my writing I described someone using an axe, and could only say 'he swung the axe', but after simply chopping some wood with a ...


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Very likely your understanding of whips is only theoretical and thus very superficial. Think of riding a bike and imagine that you knew of bikes and that you "sat" on them and "rode" them, but had never actually seen a bike used, much less ridden a bike yourself. If you where this unfamiliar with bikes, the idea that you might want to stand up on the pedals ...


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The biggest different between a novel and a movie is that in a novel, things are described to the reader. The reader can get inside the character's head, be told what the characters are feeling, what the characters and thinking... This doesn't happen in a movie. A movie can only show, not tell. A screenplay has to be entirely visual (and auditory.) This is ...


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I've tried to do this myself, so I'll pass along what I've learned. First, note that the audience hears a play about one-third as fast (150-200 words per minute) as they read a novel (500-600 words a minute). Because of that, a screenplay requires "crisper" writing, with fewer excess words than a novel. A novel might describe a hero's actions as follows: ...



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