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Sexual abuse is a very sensitive topic. Describing acts of sexual abuse in great detail is very risqué. Do it badly, and you risk to offend a lot of people who experienced sexual abuse them self. Make up your mind how you want to portrait the sexual abuse. Do you want it to horrify the reader? Then you should try to stay away from any "dirty talk" and ...


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Do not forget, that you do not have to include any details. Recently I saw quite below average thriller Donkey Punch which is being placed in Spain. But whole Spain serves just as background to the story and because it actually takes place on a yacht in the middle of sea, you could successfully move the story to Hawaii without any influence to the story ...


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As part of your research, you could get to know some people who come from that area. Even better, see if any of them would be willing to be alpha or beta readers and look for mistakes.


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Unless you write to portrait life in a specific culture, fiction is mainly about people, and people are basically the same everywhere. Everyone wants physical safety, health, social connections, love, entertainment, and so on. People everywhere love their children, are jealous, strive for economic success, feel insecure or happy or sad. Since you are a human ...


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"Write what you know" is a guideline, not a law, or every book would be an autobiography. If you want to write about other countries, you say you've done a lot of research, which is a great start. That will keep you from making basic mistakes, like having your characters drive on the incorrect side of the road or dress inappropriately. Beyond that, either ...


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I would say that you should definitely include time/date, but as was mentioned above, you should show, not tell. If you have to tell, I would use the chapter header mentioned by Mac Cooper. But actually stating that information within the body of the text itself might not be a good idea. The most important thing is to have a very good sense of time, date, ...


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You only have to watch Downton Abbey to realize that the 1920s were a period of rapid social upheaval in the UK. Some people clung to the old ways with a death-grip; others cast aside all conventional behavior (and mostly got ostracized for it). Most people sought a middle ground, which was tricky because the ground kept shifting. So, the first thing you ...


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As to establishing an alternative universe or setting an alt-historical theme I'm a big believer in the Nineteen Eighty Four slap-in-the-face method: It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen Monica's suggestion of making reference to some clear and obvious anachronism dropped into the narrative flow in an almost ...


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If to you the chapter seems good, and it seems to be fulfilling your purpose for it, I would not worry about it now. If it is too short, what that really means one of the following: either you didn't establish as much in the opening chapter as you think you did, or else there's some other major problem (e.g. it's short because you're infodumping, or because ...


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I'm personally of the opinion chapters exist more to organize information and events. It's functionally identical in most cases to have 20 chapters to having 10 chapters twice as long. Of course formatting or specific requirements might come in (publishers wanting specific chapter lengths, for example, and if this is a potential concern, you should research ...


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In my experience, and from research into other's writing and professional opinions, the length or lack there of does not matter. Only you can know when your chapter is officially over. If you feel you have accomplished what you intended when you wrote that first chapter, than it is a success. If you feel it is lacking, than it probably is. Reread it and see ...


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In my experience, chapter length does not matter. Your book may look more 'impressive' or 'official' with long chapters, but are they necessary to the book itself? No. As long as the first chapter does what the first chapter is supposed to do (be that introducing the protagonist, setting the scene, introducing the conflict, etc.), it doesn't matter if it is ...


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You first described it as "set in the late 1920s", and then later said you were "writing pseudo-historically in an alternate universe". I'm not bringing this up to nit-pick your question but, rather, to point out that these are two different things. There is historical fiction, where authors try to remain accurate, and there is alternate history, where ...


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Please please please PLEASE use date/time of day references. Please. With chocolate on top. It's way too easy to get lost in the flow of narration and not have a damn clue when we are. Is it morning? Is it night? Shouldn't the moon be out? How can the narrator see the cows jumping off the cliff if it's the middle of the night? Why is daylight slanting ...


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Saying "In the end of June" is a form of telling instead of showing. That is, you've told us time had passed, but it's not meaningful to us in terms of what it means for the character, setting, or plot. With just a little more information, it does flow well with the time information: I had finals to finish and an apartment to pack up, so despite the ...


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Yes, it constitutes a lie, technically speaking. Yes, it is legal. The use of pseudonyms is an established practice in publishing. There's a wide range of reasons where writing under a pseudonym might be obviously beneficial to the author: The author's real name is similar to the name of a more-popular author; readers might confuse the two. The author is ...


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Note: I am not a lawyer In Czech, we have saying: "When there is no lawsuit, there is no damage" In other words. Someone lied to you. So what? What can you accuse them from? What is the damage caused to you? The question is not about legality but more over about morality because the only damage caused can be, that you are not going to buy a book ...


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The public image of public figures is largely made up or manipulated. Politicians hold doctorate degrees by questionable foreign universities or are being convicted of plagiarism. Degrees signify expertise to the voters, but take time and effort. George Clooney and other stars supposedly pay young women to play their spouses for some time so as to appear ...


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"This book is a work of fiction..."


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When a prologue is used if Fantasy, Science Fiction, or Historical novels it's common to show some of the historical, cultural, or political background leading up to the action.


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Usually a prologue is outside the main flow of the story in some way: Tease with an out-of-sequence scene. The prologue might tease us by previewing a pivotal scene that will occur later in the main storyline. Often this is a snippet of the climax. Give context through a different viewpoint. A prologue might put the story into a wider context by offering a ...


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I agree with Lauren's answer: A prologue is anything before the main body of a text, and can be whatever the author wants it to be. What matters is that it reads well. However, in my experience, an introduction, preface, or forward is usually written in the writer's or editor's voice; prologues are usually (but not always) part of the novel's story. All ...


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A prologue is pro, before, the logos, word. It's text before the main body of the text. Whether a work needs a prologue is entirely up to the author. There is no right or wrong way to write one. There is no right or wrong content. It can serve as an introduction, a teaser, a flashback, background material, a recap, or anything else the author thinks might ...



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