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My favorite rags-riches-rags story is the classic folktale "The Fisherman and His Wife." It's not clear that the title couple is happier at the end, but there's a strong sense that they are better off as they are. http://www.pitt.edu/~dash/grimm019.html. Orson Scott Card's "Unaccompanied Sonata" also has the up and down story arc, with an ambiguous ending. ...


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Ask him about his experiences as a talented kid, how it makes him different than his peers. What about the social impact? Is he ostracized due to his talents? What is he talented in? How does his talent manifest in his day-to-day life? Don't be condescending--I've been around a lot of gifted and talented kids--they can understand big words and so on, but ...


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Another approach would be, on your own website or blog - is to write a veiled rebuttal. I wouldn't directly mention the bad review, but just write as if you are clarifying some issues or points for current/future readers. But of course this blog post would address the issues that the bad review got factually wrong, and even address some of the other issues ...


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They make their profit either by buying at a discount the same as other retailers, or by selling at a premium to buyers who don't notice that the book is available at a lower price. How they buy books: At the retail price from CreateSpace's or Amazon's store, same as any other retail customer. At the wholesale price (60% discount from retail price) ...


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I think "selected literary pieces or passages" is your linchpin here. Let's take that college mainstay, the Norton Anthology (this one is American Literature). This is a book which contains quotes, poems, short stories, and excerpts of longer works. (IIRC — it'a been a while) The various pieces can be grouped by kind (poetry, quotes), by date, by region, ...



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