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You might find it more useful to browse a bookstore. It has books currently in print, and the covers and titles represent the latest trends. Assuming you know what you're going to write about, invest plenty of time in the title, description and cover, because these are the things that have a disproportionately large influence over the book's chance of ...


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There are many great jargon terms for these things. At one publication we called any such blurb an "excuse" (pronounced as the word that means 'why something happened,' not 'excuse me')


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You can use internal monologue in between the action beats. Show reaction beats: "I did this. He flinched. Then he did that".


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I have written 2 narrative travel books. My advice is - use lots of dialogue, look into the monomyth structure, increase drama where possible and try to build an emotional connection between the reader and characters by embellishing the ups and downs the character is facing.


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From what I can see, there seems to be no way of writing an interesting account, without violating your ethics. But I would bet my bottom dollar that at least 50% of "non-fiction" accounts embellish on the facts. Sure, maybe you don't want to add whole paragraphs of made-up details, but without some details (e.g, "My hand held tightly to the cold metal of ...


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Fictionalizing a philosophical/cultural concept isn't illegal, uncommon, or, in my opinion, unethical. Fictionalizing can actually help popularize a concept that might otherwise languish in obscurity. If you are fortunate to get published, you might ask to have an author's note included at the end of the book referencing the original article --I've seen ...


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Plagiarism is an academic violation that applies to scholarly papers. It doesn't apply to works of fiction. The whole point of a scholarly paper is that you're presenting something that you claim is a new and original idea or discovery. If you copied it from someone else, then your paper is a fraud. Of course you may use ideas from others and build on ...


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You're using inspiration from a real-life character in a fictitious world, which has been done by every writer ever. Utilizing a mindset you notice in real life in your work isn't plagiarism any more than setting your story in a location that actually exists. Of course, that doesn't mean you should copy the guy's words verbatim from the previous article, ...



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