Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

NOTE: I am not a lawyer, and the following is just the result of some Google searching. You're allowed to publish basically anything you want; the concern is not whether you will be able to publish it to begin with, but whether you can be sued (for libel or misrepresentation) later on. Even if you would win such a lawsuit, it would probably be expensive ...


4

I have the exact same problem whenever I sit down to write. I like the idea of placeholders (like Lauren suggested) and I use that a lot. If I find myself stuck while writing a sentence, I just add some placeholders or, more often, asterisks that refer to notes on a separate page. If needed I add simple sketches/illustrations to my notes so that when I ...


4

Use placeholders. If you have an idea of what you want a phrase to accomplish but you aren't there yet, just jot it down in brackets so you know what to do when you come back to polish. ("TK" is slang for "to come," and here it means "I will come back and finish this.") The script for "Plato's Stepchildren" had Kirk being forced to kiss Uhura, making it ...


4

If you're writing a review or critique of the article, then you should definitely be talking about "the article says" or "the author says". But as I understand you, you're saying that you're supposed to write a summary of the article, not a critique. In that case, you should NOT be talking about the article, but about the subject. You should generally not ...


3

That would be the "author bio" Here are some links that may be of use: http://www.rachellegardner.com/2011/07/how-to-write-a-terrific-author-bio/ http://www.absolutewrite.com/freelance_writing/bio.htm


2

The fastest way to find the nice turn of phrase is to write the whole piece. The phrase you seek will often just fall out of your fingers as you write. Or when you read the piece after you've written it, you will notice the themes that you've weaved throughout. Or you will get a feeling or a thought or an image as you experience the whole piece after you've ...


2

I'm not sure that you can. Good writing is hard work. But two thoughts, neither of which is intended to be offensive. They are what I find helpful. First, I try to avoid perfectionistic tendencies. As a recovering perfectionist, I find that forcing myself past the beginning helps. I can come back and hit it later. But realistically, I do spend the most time ...


2

Try thinking of your idea as the central character. The 'typical' person-based story takes an individual who is flawed in some fashion. He (or she) has certain drives and desires, some of which conflict with others. Through the course of the story the character overcomes adversity until, at the end, he has grown and become more mature (or hasn't learned ...


2

This is a legal question more than a writing question. You probably should find a lawyer or law-related site to ask. What country are you planning to publish in? Laws vary by country. But just based on my general knowledge of United States law: A judge might possibly issue an injunction based on preliminary findings. You should then have an opportunity to ...


2

I believe a combination of two things would work better in your case. I use a lot of placeholders for names of things - characters, places, etc. When I'm writing fantasy, or sci-fi, for example, I don't want to go around looking for the names (I like to research everything, including names, before making a commitment). However, placeholders for what you ...


2

I think you're exactly right, as using "we will" might seem excessively formal even for non-fiction, but you've avoided "it's" which, apart from the informality, increases the chance that somewhere one instance will lose it's comma, or one will sneak into the possessive as in the example a few words ago.


2

For what you need to do legally, you'll need to consult a lawyer in your jurisdiction. Laws vary. The rest of this answer is about practical considerations. First, are you on good terms with the person whose email you want to use? Do you want to be on good terms after you publish your work? If so, then talk with this person. Nobody likes surprises, and ...


2

I guess the answer will depend on your country. In many European countries, emails fall under the "Secrecy of Correspondence", and breaking this can result in a prison sentence. What the laws of your country say about this, I wouldn't know. The Wikipedia article mentions the situation in the United States. Another legal question in this situation is ...


1

This has nothing to do with the law, but my own personal ethics. Understand that the two are in no way correlated, given that the law is often an arbitrary beast. There is a saying--often attributed to Admiral Grace Hopper--that it is often better to ask forgiveness than permission. I don't believe in asking permission to do anything creative or productive ...


1

My question is: How does one go about involving people in a book that's secretly more or less about one or more ideas? For example, if I wanted to write a book about grammar, what are some ways to get readers interested in the book on a more personal level Why must the idea be a secret? I can think of several non-fiction books I've read and ...


1

Various grammatical issues, with suggestions below ... he realised that Ariett was no more following "he realised that Ariett was no longer following" or "he realised that Ariett was not following" "Are you really sure he's trapped in the boneyard?" the voice would say. ""Are you really sure he's trapped in the boneyard?" the voice said." ...


1

You are very concise, precise, sterile in your writing, and I see you are asking the correct question to make this text better. If your text was a dish, it would be well cooked but rather dry and in need of a good sauce. What is missing here are more emotions. You are reporting events in a very soldier-like manner. The sentence you asked about is a good ...


1

Peter looked where Ariett was pointing and saw the little crowd near the treehouse. If we're in Peter's head in this scene, we can also do this: Ariett was pointing at the little crowd near the treehouse. If we're in Peter's head, we know that these are his observations. So we know he's looking at Ariett and then at where she's pointing.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible