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9

I highly suggest you do nothing. A) is a very bad idea - it will tarnish your reputation as argumentative and rude. C) could easily be construed as doing A) -- even with the best intentions, someone could take it out of context -- so it's also best to avoid that. As for if my answer would change for a different type of novel, definitely no. This is good ...


7

Bracketed statements are typically found inside quotes. The words are bracketed to indicate that they were not the exact words from the quotes, but are either paraphrased or included to give clarity to the words. To use your example a little bit, suppose that the actual quote you want to refer to was: "See that hill over there? The man walked up that ...


5

Mark Twain did not learn how to write by reading a book about how to write. Neither did Hermann Melville, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Goethe, Proust, etc. Buying and (maybe) reading how-to-write books is a symptom of procrastination. Wannabe writers have shelves of them. And every time they feel afraid of starting to write and making ...


4

Instead of "fiction" (made up) and "non-fiction" (facts) I'll use the terms "novel" and "textbook". We expect a novel, both fiction and non-fiction, to be about experience and possibly ideas, and textbooks to be about detailed information. But there are countless counter examples. For example the scholarly field of ethnology often employs first person ...


3

My favorite example of presenting a very technical subject in an informal manner is Designing an Authentication System: a Dialogue in Four Scenes. When you read it you will be able to see that there is no limit on how technical a subject you can cover in light prose, and that in some cases it is better than formal styles. So we know it can be done, the ...


3

I would say write what you are capable of. If your talents are non-fiction, straight to the point works then definitely write it that way. But if you are very skilled at writing fiction stories detailing adventures or thought-provoking ideas, then do that. Personally, I would write a fiction novel detailing all the technical experience of advanced diving ...


3

The problem with taking a real-world believe system and implanting it in a fantasy world is that it greatly stretches the suspension of disbelieve when you use the same terms the real-world believe system is using. The terms are usually the result of cultural circumstances during the founding of the believe system. When your believe system is indeed ...


3

Meebo gleeb owt anso gilf?+ Don't you agree? +I'll explain in a moment. Question Heard Around the Writing World Can a book teach you to write? Well, of course not. For no matter how great the book, the pupil herself may be completely obstinate and impenetrable to the lessons. What Would A Book About Writing Teach? "Furthermore," the cynic says. ...


3

In my experience, as a general rule-of-thumb, if you look at the number of reviews a book has on Amazon and multiply by 100, you'll be in the ballpark of their sales on Amazon. Some books might be double or quadruple this, and others might be half or less, but it gives you a general idea of whether you're talking about a book that sold 1,000 copies, 10,000 ...


3

There are definitely some great resources out there. If you're into creative nonfiction, I would check out: Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writer's Guide from the Neiman Foundation at Harvard University by Mark Kramer. It's essentially a collection of essays from various nonfiction contributors that contains a lot of great advice that can help you ...


2

Sometimes it may be difficult to tell if a book is based on real events, but often the book makes this explicit. "Documentary" is a term generally applied to films, not books. But there are books based on true events, and they're generally just called "non-fiction". There may be references to "novelistic form" or "literary non-fiction" to describe a book ...


2

This comment: Moreover, successful fiction authors don't write books about writing fiction. ...is false. Le Guin, Bradbury, Card, Block, King all wrote books about writing fiction, and they are all successful to one degree or another. And this comment: I can't think of anything, other than altruism, that would motivate them to publish their ...


2

It's all very easy. Think like your patients. Look at their problem from their perspective. You can already do that, or otherwise your therapies wouldn't work. Structure the content. That is, create a narrative similar to the underlying plot of a novel: develop a plan of what you want to say in what order. Looking at the problem from the perspective of ...


2

I wanted to write what Nicole wrote, but she already did (+1), so I'm going to write something else. A productive – as in facilitating – response to a negative review is to try your best and forget for a moment that you are in love with your own work (because it is the materialization of what a beautiful and wonderful person you are), and instead take your ...


1

You're talking about two very different kinds of book. In a way this is like asking, "I'm going to college. Should I major in chemistry or poetry?" That all depends on what you like, what you're good at, and what you expect to do with the degree. Someone could list the pros and cons of each, but without knowing your wants and needs and aptitudes, there's no ...


1

There's no need to choose. Write both.


1

Is it better to write that as a non-fiction book or develop a novel on the subject? With one huge exception, my general answer would be that you should write a straightforward instructional book. Most novels I have read that simply wrapped a story round a lesson read like books for children. That annoys me. I'm a grown up. I don't need the pill sugared. Now ...


1

Not my mother tongue, so bear with me :) In my eyes, 'writing' consists of (at least) three areas of abilities and knowledge. The creative (what does happen in my, for instance, novel?) The structural (When/ in what order should it happen for the most effect and to satisfy readers expectations?) The craft (how do I physically act to transfer the ...


1

Folks here might be able to give you more helpful advice if you can be more specific than "non-fiction". Is it a history book? Astronomy? How to fix plumbing? Etc. That said: I think you always have to consider your audience. What level background do your readers bring to the subject? A book on astronomy intended for 10 year olds would surely be very ...


1

In my experience, a response always legitimizes a critique, so unless a) you have a policy of responding to all reviews, b) you yourself actually think the criticisms are legitimate, or c) the reviewer already has a position of legitimacy higher than yours (i.e. "Top Reviewer" status), responding is intrinsically counterproductive.


1

Sure, you could say this sort of thing about any how-to book. Just yesterday I saw an ad for a video titled, "How to get your message across in 30 seconds!". In small print it says, "Running time: 45 minutes". Apparently the people who made the video didn't see the irony. It's a common joke that people who write "how to get rich books" get rich by selling ...


1

William Zinsser’s “On Writing Well” is the one I would suggest. (I am not an English native.) It provides sections on how to write about people, places, sports, business, the arts, and yourself. One can find many tips and instructions on how to turn an average prose – even in the form of email, personal letter, office notes etc - into a tight, clean and ...


1

How you structure your article will largely depend on who your readers are and what you would like them to learn from it. If your readers are people from the scientific community, then you would structure your article based on what new findings, discoveries or trends that your research has led you to. A title for this kind of article would be, "Bullying at ...


1

Usually it's the author or the author's estate/agent/descendant who holds the original copyrights, so you don't need to contact a large number of publishers, just that one entity for bulk of works. In rare cases the author might have fully sold copyrights (as opposed to licensing the publishers for release) and in these cases you will need to contact these ...


1

If you know which chapter/section number you need - you know it from table of contents. And that means you know the page number and know which way to go. OTOH, if you remember "Stochastic methods, Limitations" was roughly 2/3 into the book, you can flip pages quickly, skimming the headers, and find required section easily. I'd find it really surprising to ...


1

I see no problem with this. There are many books that take a real world thought system and put it into a fictional universe. Think of samurai western movies, buddhist monks in space operas, meditation and yoga and all kinds of philosophical views in countless novels or films, and not to forget christian values reflected almost everywhere. Apart from the ...


1

Possible consequences: People get mad: Especially if the story gets popular. And the madness can come from unexpected directions. Good example is Harry Potter which is claimed to promote Satanism an Witchcraft by Christian community People will try to correct you: Especially in fiction book and if becomes popular. It is clear that you cannot describe the ...


1

I just popped into my office and pulled a few books off the shelf. It's easy to estimate: Count up the total number of words on 10 random (full) lines from different places and divide by 10 to get the average words-per-line. Count the number of lines on each page to get the lines-per-page. Check that the book actually starts on page 1 - sometimes the stuff ...



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