Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Bracketed statements are typically found inside quotes. The words are bracketed to indicate that they were not the exact words from the quotes, but are either paraphrased or included to give clarity to the words. To use your example a little bit, suppose that the actual quote you want to refer to was: "See that hill over there? The man walked up that ...


5

Mark Twain did not learn how to write by reading a book about how to write. Neither did Hermann Melville, William Faulkner, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Goethe, Proust, etc. Buying and (maybe) reading how-to-write books is a symptom of procrastination. Wannabe writers have shelves of them. And every time they feel afraid of starting to write and making ...


4

The question is who you want to write for. I read one of the major daily newspapers of my country every day. The articles appear well researched (and are well written), and I feel I learn something reading them. But whenever an article deals with a topic in which I am an expert myself, I see many flaws: false information, central concepts not touched upon, ...


4

In a case like this I would recommend looking up town records and using an old residential address that has since been demolished. This might take a bit of work, but gives the accuracy that your client seems to be looking for. Otherwise, look up some addresses and pick a number in between. Only locals would know the problem, and it would be a Platform 9 3/4 ...


3

There are definitely some great resources out there. If you're into creative nonfiction, I would check out: Telling True Stories: A Nonfiction Writer's Guide from the Neiman Foundation at Harvard University by Mark Kramer. It's essentially a collection of essays from various nonfiction contributors that contains a lot of great advice that can help you ...


3

Read books published for that age range / reading level. This gives me a general feel for themes, characters, plot compexity etc. Find definitions of those levels. Often publishers explain how they define the reading levels on their website for parents (who buy the books) to understand where their own child ranges. (Children's reading level varies greatly ...


3

As user8789 says, there are formulas to calculate the reading level of a sample of text. Personally, I wouldn't take these too seriously. For example, consider this paragraph: The children were playing with a soccer ball in the yard, and when Bethany kicked it, it went way over the fence, into the neighbor's yard, and then it rolled very far down the ...


3

This has nothing to do with the law, but my own personal ethics. Understand that the two are in no way correlated, given that the law is often an arbitrary beast. There is a saying--often attributed to Admiral Grace Hopper--that it is often better to ask forgiveness than permission. I don't believe in asking permission to do anything creative or productive ...


2

The problem with taking a real-world believe system and implanting it in a fantasy world is that it greatly stretches the suspension of disbelieve when you use the same terms the real-world believe system is using. The terms are usually the result of cultural circumstances during the founding of the believe system. When your believe system is indeed ...


2

It's all very easy. Think like your patients. Look at their problem from their perspective. You can already do that, or otherwise your therapies wouldn't work. Structure the content. That is, create a narrative similar to the underlying plot of a novel: develop a plan of what you want to say in what order. Looking at the problem from the perspective of ...


2

The Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level Readability Formula Step 1: Calculate the average number of words used per sentence. Step 2: Calculate the average number of syllables per word. Step 3: Multiply the average number of words by 0.39 and add it to the average number of syllables per word multiplied by 11.8. Step 4: Subtract 15.59 from the result. The ...


2

Just don't fall into the trap of multiple perspectives and tenses for multiple perspectives' and tenses' sake. In the hands of a good writer with a concrete vision, these are effective techniques. Otherwise if your vision isn't concrete, probably best to channel some Strunk and White and focus on simple, serviceable writing that tells a story. 2nd-person ...


2

Sometimes it may be difficult to tell if a book is based on real events, but often the book makes this explicit. "Documentary" is a term generally applied to films, not books. But there are books based on true events, and they're generally just called "non-fiction". There may be references to "novelistic form" or "literary non-fiction" to describe a book ...


2

In my experience, as a general rule-of-thumb, if you look at the number of reviews a book has on Amazon and multiply by 100, you'll be in the ballpark of their sales on Amazon. Some books might be double or quadruple this, and others might be half or less, but it gives you a general idea of whether you're talking about a book that sold 1,000 copies, 10,000 ...


2

This comment: Moreover, successful fiction authors don't write books about writing fiction. ...is false. Le Guin, Bradbury, Card, Block, King all wrote books about writing fiction, and they are all successful to one degree or another. And this comment: I can't think of anything, other than altruism, that would motivate them to publish their ...


2

In historical fiction use real address for real historical events. If a real historical figure lived in a house that is there to this day, use it. If some real place was a famous hangout of some society, use it. If you know of historical events that took at a specific location, have them re-enacted there in your story. Say, you write a story about the ...


2

Meebo gleeb owt anso gilf?+ Don't you agree? +I'll explain in a moment. Question Heard Around the Writing World Can a book teach you to write? Well, of course not. For no matter how great the book, the pupil herself may be completely obstinate and impenetrable to the lessons. What Would A Book About Writing Teach? "Furthermore," the cynic says. ...


1

Sure, you could say this sort of thing about any how-to book. Just yesterday I saw an ad for a video titled, "How to get your message across in 30 seconds!". In small print it says, "Running time: 45 minutes". Apparently the people who made the video didn't see the irony. It's a common joke that people who write "how to get rich books" get rich by selling ...


1

William Zinsser’s “On Writing Well” is the one I would suggest. (I am not an English native.) It provides sections on how to write about people, places, sports, business, the arts, and yourself. One can find many tips and instructions on how to turn an average prose – even in the form of email, personal letter, office notes etc - into a tight, clean and ...


1

How you structure your article will largely depend on who your readers are and what you would like them to learn from it. If your readers are people from the scientific community, then you would structure your article based on what new findings, discoveries or trends that your research has led you to. A title for this kind of article would be, "Bullying at ...


1

Usually it's the author or the author's estate/agent/descendant who holds the original copyrights, so you don't need to contact a large number of publishers, just that one entity for bulk of works. In rare cases the author might have fully sold copyrights (as opposed to licensing the publishers for release) and in these cases you will need to contact these ...


1

Most countries have laws that protect the privacy of their citizens. This includes the right to not have images or information about you published without your consent. The only situation that allows private information or images to be published despite an individual's wishes to the contrary is if the public need-to-know is rated higher than the ...


1

From a legal standpoint, I'm pretty sure that so long as you don't introduce new information which is not necessarily true ("Unbeknownst to his family, Bob was a Satan worshipper who was responsible for the recent spate of sea otter murders in the area"), and specifically untrue in a way which could make it look like you have an ax to grind against a certain ...


1

I am not aware of paying an interviewee for an article or book. I have never done it. There are books available on the art of the interview, which you should consult. You can record the interview, with permission (included in the recording) which is a protection for both writer and interviewee, and is a release of sorts; you can offer to provide pertinent ...


1

If you know which chapter/section number you need - you know it from table of contents. And that means you know the page number and know which way to go. OTOH, if you remember "Stochastic methods, Limitations" was roughly 2/3 into the book, you can flip pages quickly, skimming the headers, and find required section easily. I'd find it really surprising to ...


1

I see no problem with this. There are many books that take a real world thought system and put it into a fictional universe. Think of samurai western movies, buddhist monks in space operas, meditation and yoga and all kinds of philosophical views in countless novels or films, and not to forget christian values reflected almost everywhere. Apart from the ...


1

Possible consequences: People get mad: Especially if the story gets popular. And the madness can come from unexpected directions. Good example is Harry Potter which is claimed to promote Satanism an Witchcraft by Christian community People will try to correct you: Especially in fiction book and if becomes popular. It is clear that you cannot describe the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible