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17

That's totally nonsense. Stupid gender category thinking. Just ignore statements like this one. The truth is that many women do not think (because of this nonsense) that men can write fiction for women (probably because they think men do not understand women). Therefore male writers use a female pseudonym if they want to sell romances and stuff where the ...


9

Maybe you shouldn't be writing. Maybe you should be collaborating. Sketch the thing out and hire a partner, or a ghostwriter. Short stories. Fewer words, and less need to create a world. You only need to create as much as is necessary to make the story hold up. Tell stories out loud instead. Find a library which needs volunteers (a bit redundant, I know) ...


7

There probably is a kernel of truth here, but it has nothing to do with gender as such. If you're writing in first-person because you want the reader to connect and identity with the character, and you want the basis of that connection to be some quintessential aspect of a social identity that speaks to a shared experience of people in that group... yeah, ...


7

How to I shift my dialogue into narrative or descriptive text and still maintain the character development, relationship development, and plot movement that I get from writing dialogue? You don't. If you can do character/relationship development done through dialogue, that's excellent. Note frequently shifting to non-verbal communication will have a ...


7

First, for the purposes of NaNoWriMo I strongly suggest that you shoot your inner editor in the head. Write the most awful dreck that you can imagine, and then go back and fix it. But as for answering your actual question, you should alternate between description and dialogue in the same scene. That is, instead of doing the following: [Several long ...


5

Contractions are fine in narration. As with other aspects of the narrator's diction and voice, the use or avoidance of contractions helps characterize the narrator, and indicates something about the formality/informality of the story.


5

No, I love it. I think it's great. The narrator is sort of echoing the perspective of the the person being observed, and you're absolutely right that the two characters see things differently and speak differently. Having a different narrative "voice" for the two of them is a subtle way of showing the reader their worldviews before they even open their ...


5

If you want to be cool and scientific, explaining a process, do it in third person. "The subject is, the subject feels". This is the professional mode, very impartial but neither the easies to write nor the easiest to understand. If that's a colleague though, feel free to use whatever you feel like, First person, second, third, first introducing the actors: ...


5

I read a book on Creative Writing before that suggested that if you describe an acquaintance of the protagonist as beautiful, then they will (in the reader's mind) automatically become the protagonists love interest. Discriminations aside, if the protagonist does certain things, or you describe certain things, it does give readers some preconceptions about ...


5

I also questioned the validity of the internal "lecturing" monologue, but much to my surprise, people often said this was their favourite part of the story. When I added other monologues to my other stories, they once again became the highlight of the story for a few people. John Green does this a lot too. In an Abundance of Katherines, the vast majority of ...


4

I don't think the information is entirely unnecessary, but it's dry. Lauren gave a good answer about adding more feeling; in this answer I'll focus on another style issue. You have a lot of "she did this, then she did that, then she did something else...". That feels repetitive. Sometimes you want to convey the action itself; other times you want to ...


4

"Women are meant to be loved, not to be understood." -- Oscar Wilde But to the extent that it is true that men do not understand women, it follows that if a man attempts to write a story from a woman's point of view but is totally off-base due to gender-wide ignorance of women, that any other man reading it will be just as ignorant and so not see any ...


4

Easiest way: only tell the highlights. If it isn't pertinent to the progression of the story, don't put it in. If it is, don't leave it out. That's about as simple as it gets. Hope this helps!


4

You can only do this if the entire section is narrated this way. If you are doing the entire chapter/scene/section etc. from the five-year-old's perspective, it will work. What you cannot do is have two paragraphs in this style and then, without a scene break, switch back to a normal, adult narrative style. ETA clarification as requested: When you have two ...


4

Honestly, I can't tell if the narrator is supposed to be male or female, but I do kind of get the feeling that the author is probably male — especially if the narrator is supposed to be female. (And yes, I got that impression even before looking at your name and profile picture.) OK, let me unpack that a bit. In the first paragraph, what stand out ...


4

In short amounts, as you've done above, such "lecturing" is okay in first person. You're really not lecturing the reader so much as showing the narrator's state of mind. The trick is to ensure that these statements (also known as interior monologues) don't become long rants that are authorial intrusions and slow the forward movement of the plot.


4

The reason you think it's obvious is that you assume that only a woman would be having a romantic dinner with a man. Your baseline assumption is that everyone is straight. There is absolutely nothing in the text which precludes the narrator from being a gay or bi man having a romantic dinner with another gay or bi man. If you want to assert her gender, you ...


3

No! Absolutely forbidden! The Rule Book XVII of the Writers Inquisition explicitly forbids under pains of corporal punishment!! Just kidding. That's a pretty standard, rather nice form. I usually use ellipsis where you used em-dash, but both are acceptable (and some use a colon, it's acceptable there too.) There are a few mild typos/mistakes ( "it was ...


3

Have you tried writing Kōans? They are between one sentence and one paragraph long. Pure prose. No special prerequisites to writing them. Try to write some great Kōans.


3

It's dry because there's not much emotion there. You're telling us a lot, but you're not showing us much. You have two instances of her being "puzzled," but the rest is just a description of her movements. What is she thinking? What is she feeling? Here's an example. You start with this great sensory image: She made her way through the sand barefoot, ...


3

I think you’re coming at this problem from the wrong premise. Your female narrator does not need to drop hints about her gender in every third paragraph. Think about your own life: do you spend every waking minute conscious of your gender (“I am a man and I am eating this sandwich in a manly way, tearing the bread and smoked turkey with my sharp teeth”)? ...


2

On the contrary! I'd say Intuitives probably have more patience in writing to work with than their Sensate cousins. Your problem is likely that you're an Extrovert and don't like to spend a whole lot of time alone. Obscure psychological theories aside, let's cut to the chase. I just want to spend that time thinking more than writing. Okay. You're not ...


2

You say you love to invent stories and come up with ideas, this is a good start for a writer, so I don't agree with the answers and comments you've received so far suggesting you shouldn't be one. As you've already figured out, screenplays are an excellent format for narrative. Most screenplays now a days even leave out technical details like for instance ...


2

This page seems to suggest that books that teach contractions target children between the ages of 4-8, so it would depend on what age children you're targeting, it could be that the average 4 year old might not understand contractions however I would very surprised if an average 8 year old didn't understand them. Otherwise, they're proper grammar so if you ...


2

If you are writing in first person, the language used needs to be roughly mainstream consistent with the age, location, etc. of the narrative character. If the two are hugely out-of-sync, it can cause a lot of discord while being read because the "person" that is speaking is saying things and using words that are out of character, thus unexpected and often ...


2

In principle, if it doesn't matter, if the idea is just that this happened sometime in the past, then you don't need to bog the story down with details about exactly when. I certainly wouldn't go into some long description if it doesn't matter. I mean, I wouldn't say, "In the third year after she graduated college, on the tenth of June, at 3:15 in the ...


2

It's not necessary to make it clear, specially because sometimes you can "play" with it confusing the reader to create impact. There are plenty of examples. It's quite common in movies but I don't exactly remind any in books right now. But, that doesn't mean in your context it is valid. When somebody uses subterfuges like that, he is prepared and whiling ...


2

I use flashback to explain my character's present predicament. The flashback is a specific incident. I have found that if I make the flashback complicated (i.e. with multiple timeframes), I then risk the ability to seamlessly transit back to the present. In this regard, I always indicate somehow the start and end of the flashback. In you example, I am ...


2

These are tightly connected. POV (Point of View) tells about the person, "through whose eyes we look". "Perspective" is the name for that style of view. An autobiography will be written from the author's POV, in 1st person perspective - or from POV of some protagonist. A guide will be written in 2nd person, from the reader's POV. 3rd person will be just 3rd ...


2

While it is true that nothing you wrote specifically says it is a female narrator, I do think that the perception is of one, due to the attention to small details of a flower, and the inner dialogue about emotions. I'm not saying that it HAS to be a female, but I would think it was based on that, and I also e-mailed the snippet to a couple of others who ...



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