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Within reason, if the name itself is not already instantly recognizable (Bart Simpson, Lara Croft, James Bond), you can probably get away with using it. "Trent Steele" may be generic enough. Similarly, there are only so many variants and arrangements of organization and darkness, so whatever you come up with has probably been used or alluded to elsewhere. ...


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Perhaps you're too over focused on the name and other details. To the reader, we only care if the name is way too hard to remember, too long, ridiculous, or if the other charcter are saying it way too much. But, yes, if they can't remember their own name, it would make a good revelation. Other than that it shouldn't be a big deal at all. It's the ...


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This is at least the third question you've posted about revealing the name of a character. I think you're obsessing over this tiny point way too much. Just give him a name and be done with it. Most stories start out identifying the main characters' names in the first few paragraph, usually in a totally nonchalant way. Often at least one main character is ...


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You're phrasing seems backwards. In fiction, there is almost never a "big, showy production about the revelation of a charactedr's name". Usually character names are introduced quite matter-of-factly. "When Bob arrived at work he met his friend Charlie." "Sally entered the room." Etc. We just say the person's name and that's it. The only time you'd have a ...


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According to the wiktionary, a "name" is "any nounal word or phrase which indicates a particular person, place, class, or thing." Implications: "The Dark Lord" is a fully valid name. There is no reason whatsoever why a character should not have more than one name. As a matter of fact he can have as many names as intelligent entities who are referring to ...


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No, there should never be a big showy production about the revelation of a character's name. (Unless it's absolutely necessary to do so.)


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It depends on context. Why has the character's name never been mentioned? Why does no one know it? What label, nickname, or epithet are you using to describe the character instead? I would mention that as a reader, I'd be surprised and maybe do a double-take or two to wonder why more of a big deal wasn't being made at the reveal. If the other characters ...


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The answer to this and your other similar question is the same: Your Mileage May Vary. If you can get it to work, go for it. There's no rule about it one way or the other. In Susanna Clarke's Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell, the main villain is always referred to as "the gentleman with the thistledown hair." He's never given a name at all. The book has ...


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You can do just about anything, including leaving a character unnamed, as long as you do it well. If we're in first-person POV, then leaving the character unnamed could be a way to invite the reader to identify with the character. So, yeah, you can totally do it. However, if you plan to reveal the character's name eventually, then it would probably be ...


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There are tons of beautiful stories out there with unnamed characters. Aimee Bender's collection The Girl in the Flammable Skirt is full of them. None of the characters in Hemingway's "Hills Like White Elephants," one of the best-known stories, are given names. In Aesop's Fables we don't learn the names of the hare or tortoise, or the ant or grasshopper. ...


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There may be a good reason to do this. But in general I'd say, don't. We normally identify people by their names. Sometimes we use a title or capsule description, like "the mayor" or "Sally's brother", if we don't know the person's name or if the description is important or is how the person is addressed. Referring to a person regularly without using a name ...


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If you intentionally do not want to reveal your character's name, this could be a very interesting way to write your story; it might become awkward to read, however, although less so if you're writing in first person: in this case the reader only learns the character's name once another character calls him out. The character himself knows his name; he ...


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Generally people read for details. On 12 December 2014, Captain James D. Arkey sat in front of his computer and typed furiously. His mind began calculating and he squinted at the response code that appeared on his screen and slammed a fist down on his desk. "They couldn't have," Arkey yelled at empty office. "Those dirty rotten..." A thought ...



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