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You could use letter substitution ciphers or anagrams to make different versions of short English words with basic meanings. Then modify some of them to sound better. If you do this with a few hundred basic English words you will have a few hundred basic words in an imaginary language. Then you can assemble them into words and names each consisting of 2 ...


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In general, it can be both. Authors will often take a foreign language and edit it into a new language. For example, Tolkien's elf language was based off Finnish, and in fact, he was linguist. A reason why he made lord of the rings was to have somewhere to use his made up languages. Because of the sheer difficulty of simply creating a name off the top of ...


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If you are looking for the less common way, the most prominent way is to use combinations of foreign languages and meld them into a unique one. This is often great for an English audience that is not fluent in other languages, but if you are planning on selling your novels internationally, it might shatter the suspension of disbelief if a reader sees a word ...


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There are probably lots of names and titles that are coincidentally repeated in multiple books. To take a silly extreme, if someone tried to sue saying "He had a character in his book named John, and I have a character in my book named John. He's stealing my character name!", I can't imagine the courts would let that go very far. You can own a trademark in ...


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Within reason, if the name itself is not already instantly recognizable (Bart Simpson, Lara Croft, James Bond), you can probably get away with using it. "Trent Steele" may be generic enough. Similarly, there are only so many variants and arrangements of organization and darkness, so whatever you come up with has probably been used or alluded to elsewhere. ...



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