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Here are some of the qualities I came up with: Flow. The two words have to flow together smoothly. Brangelina is an easy combination of Brad and Angelina. It helps when the two words share letters or sounds. Syllables. Swapping out the same number of syllables keeps the rhythm of the original word. This is why Snowmageddon works. Snowpocalypse has the same ...


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I have no experience but here's what I came up with: 1: make it flow. In your examples above, Brangelina and Snowmageddon both flow much better than BeyonZ. Make it catchy. Snowmageddon is very catchy. So is Bennifer. Blizzard2016 isn't catchy. Make it relevant. Calling a snowstorm Jones had no relevancy towards the subject. Keep it short. If ...


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It is not easy to pin down, but I will make a stab at a partial answer. Firstly, people need to be able to recognise that it is made up from two separate words. Secondly, they need to know who or what the two halves are. For example, I would never have worked out 'Bennifer' if you hadn't explained it. The two halves need to clearly represent the ...


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I really like that you have him be referred to by different names. It adds nuance to his character. Now, I did something like this in one of my books. There was a character whose full name was never used at all to reference her, except in the very beginning. It's her formal name, and is only listed on official documents, and so on. Then there's her ...


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Sure, go ahead. However, you might want to think about adding some Indian cultures into the mix, just to make it interesting. But then again, this is your book, and of course you can write it however you want. I wrote an entire book with made-up traditions that make no sense in the current world, so do whatever you feel like.


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I'm reminded of an article I read once by Isaac Asimov, a well-known science fiction writer. He said that the first fiction story he wrote was set in a small town. Friends told them that this was a bad idea, because he had lived his whole life in New York City and knew nothing about small towns. But, he said, he never learned that lesson, because he went on ...


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Just because it's in a fantasy world with a European flavor doesn't mean that it's true European and has to be regionally or historically accurate. It's good to study up on medieval Europe so you can include subtle touches to give it a European look and feel, but you don't have to go overboard. I'm American, and I'm working on a world that has a medieval ...


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I think you should only use his true name and a name used by others who don't know him well. You should make Dre his real name and remove Andreas from the whole story. Unless three names are truly needed, I think it's overdoing it. Just try two.


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It's fine to write about something from a language and culture very different from your own. However, you might get warnings not to do it from some quarters because it is harder to do well than writing a language and culture you know well, especially if your intended readers are people who probably know more about that culture than you do. For you to do ...


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It's fine to write whatever you want. Go for it and see where it leads you! At this point, focus on establishing a writing habit and learning what works. If you need a guide, I highly recommend this book by the Gotham Writers' Workshop: Writing Fiction: The Practical Guide from New York's Acclaimed Creative Writing School. Also, if you're a young writer, ...


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I'm kinda having the same problem. Got myself a protagonist who is called Edvin in my first book, and then in the second one, his past is being revealed, and he had apparently lived a whole life full of conspiracies and lies, one being his name, which he changed from Arthur to Edvin before he returned home. The second book he's going to meet several of his ...


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One thing i haven't seen on this site, and a main reason that most of the examples posted used this technique, is to add character without having to explain it. For example, if you had "the mechanic' as a character, your mind automatically sees him or her as down-to-earth, black stained hands, straightforward thinker or something of the like. Or "the ...



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