Hot answers tagged

28

There are myriad questions on this site that already address this issue, and the consensus is always the same. Just write. Write for yourself. Don't even read what you've written. Don't even look back as you're writing. Write until you're finished. Once you're finished, look back over your work. Only then can you begin to be critical of style, ...


11

Why do you want to be a writer? No offense, seriously. But for me, I want to write because stories come to me and need to be written. It's not "I want to be writer" so then I have to struggle with how to be a writer and then struggle with what I want to say (since writers have to say something) and then struggle with story ideas, all so I can be a 'writer'. ...


11

I suffer from this all the time. My wife says I always write better to a deadline, but I struggle to figure out how to set deadlines and stick them. Some ideas I've been thinking about: Get someone you know to set a deadline for you, and behave as if you're writing for them. Find writing competitions on-line and write towards meeting that deadline. You may ...


11

From 7 creative principles of Pixar: 1) Never come up with just one idea. Regardless of whether you want to write a book, design a piece of furniture or make an animated movie: At the beginning, don't start with just one idea - it should be three. The reason is simple. If a producer comes to me with a proposal for a new project, then usually he has mulled ...


6

I think there are two reasons you might be procrastinating on the scene: You are afraid of doing it wrong (in that case follow Lauren Ipsum's advice). It's boring and you don't feel like writing it. If it's the second choice I suggest the following: a. Remove the scene. I know it hurts. But something I realized is that progress is not how many words you ...


6

Let me reach for that resource and hope I don't sink in the process... For The Evulz - he's a destructive force, a person who "likes to watch the world burn". No deeper reasons, no hate, no revenge. Simple love for destruction. One I can't find the trope for, "Burn down a national park to steal a bag of french fries": the disaster and resulting chaos was ...


5

Tell your friends, family, spouse that you will finish your novel in October, 15th (or whatever). Or tell it only your first draft readers. They will expect your work to be finished then. They will nag. You have a deadline.


5

Some possibilities: It was an accident. This would give him something to cope with. He works at the site, and his neglect or incompetence or other personal failing caused the problem or made it worse. He works at the site. He tried to get his superiors' attention about problems at the site. Though he did not cause the accident, he believes that he allowed ...


5

Believe it or not, there are many writers out there, real writers, who don’t particularly like writing very much. It’s true! Some find the process tedious, even torturous, and find it difficult to stay focused for the length of time it takes to finish. Like many writers out there, I’m someone who finds writing really difficult. I ultimately derive great ...


5

One note of encouragement: First drafts suck. This is practically an iron law of writing fiction. Don't worry if, after you sit down and write something out and then re-read it, the thing doesn't hang together. First drafts never do. Being a writer is about being a re-writer and editor; first just get your ideas down and then go back over and fix them. ...


4

If your idea is really good, trust me, it'll come back to you. It'll drag you out of bed and say, "Hey, I'm still here! Get out and let's create something beautiful!" So, if you decide to quit, well, maybe the idea wasn't that good. But I understand, sometimes inspiration slips away. So here are some motivation boosts: Choose a font that you can't stop ...


4

This is a very common problem among writers and I personally experience it in two distinct flavors. Sometimes, I fall in love with a story idea and just charge into writing it without spending any time on story design, character development or plotting. When I give in to this temptation, the results pretty much parallel what you are describing above. I ...


4

You're letting the perfect become the enemy of the good. You know it's a critical scene, and you're scared to screw it up. That's reasonable. The problem is that you're so scared of screwing it up that you can't even let yourself start, because you're afraid of "breaking it." Rationally, of course, you know that you can edit, rewrite, or start over. But ...


3

You have a few options: Your story didn't fail. It just didn't find its audience on that site. Post it somewhere else. Your story didn't fail. It just didn't find its audience right now. Post it again in six months. Your story didn't fail. It just needs an editor (or at least a beta reader). Find someone to read it and help you improve it. Your story ...


3

Started a nuclear disaster, potential for otherworldly elements — I'd say he's a fanatic trying to bring about the end of the world so that aliens will swoop down and rescue him. No seriously. The guy doesn't have to be sane. The chain of logic can make perfect sense in his own head (sort of a cross of Heaven's Gate, Rapture-awaiting evangelicals, and ...


2

Writing something every day can be a huge boost. For facilitating this, I've recently become a big fan of 750words.com, but anything you do to get yourself in the daily habit would work just as effectively.


2

Hum, good question, sometime motivation is hard but I can at least try to provide some answers to your three main questions. 1: Give your self permission to suck. Nothing is going to be easy the first go through, that's what rewrites and edits fore. Accept that it's not going to be the best and write it anyways, knowing that the more you write the better ...


2

I wrote a novel a couple years ago and I have two pieces of advice for the beginning steps. 1) You need an idea. 2) You need to persist. The idea is everything, an idea that you can hold onto and that guides the entire story like a lighthouse. The idea could be something very small: a plot, a scene, a character, a feeling, a theme - anything that inspires ...


2

Contend with the fact that the chances of you becoming even moderately successful as a writer are so slim that if they were to be a dress it would be size -100 You must face up to the worst case scenario and that is this: You may pour months of free time into painfully nursing a written product into a shape where you feel about as proud of it as anyone ...


2

This may seem a bit unorthodox, but if you'd like to see a very good example of an antagonist with believable motivations, the character Jack/Handsome Jack from the Borderlands video game series is an excellent place to start. This example may be a bit more outlandish/extreme than what you're going for (at least from what I can extrapolate from your House ...


2

Typically, it's difficult to publish in one country using the language of another. Even in the U.S., where there is an ever-growing increase in Spanish-speaking persons, it's difficult to find a publisher for Spanish language books. If you live in Mexico, reach out to U.S. (or even Canadian) publishing houses with your manuscript. You're more likely to ...


2

There are some very good answers posted here. I have read the one you marked as the answer, and glanced at the others, but none seem to mention the thing I find most obvious. Keep in mind they are great answers, and should definitely not be disregarded. However, I believe this is your problem, as it is with so many others: Why do you write? What are you ...


2

This happens to me as well. There are a few things I've found to help: 1) Don't ask for feedback too early --wait until the piece is finished. 2) Write shorter pieces. 3) Try to gain some emotional distance from the writing --treat producing writing like an ongoing job you have to do, not as a way to seek instant gratification. 4) Start with a solid ...


2

Several thoughts here. The first is, don't be discouraged by failure. Learn from it and move on. We all fail sometimes. Thomas Edison, when discussing his attempts to invent a practical light bulb, once said, "I haven't failed. I've found 600 ways that don't work." His point was, trying something and discovering that it doesn't work is a natural part of ...


2

I will tell you the single most helpful thing that helped me in constructing characters for a story. That is the Alignment System. It is often used in role-playing games to construct broad characters, but I've found it is a great jumping off point for creating a more detailed, well balanced character. Constructing a 2d grid and plotting good-evil and ...


2

Man up, chief. Stop looking for excuses. Sit down and finish the damn thing already. Really, that's all there is to it. Turn off the phone, disconnect the Internet, reprogram the TV with a shovel, sit down at the desk, and finish the damn story.


2

My suggestions are: The fear of being a failure isn't your enemy. It is your friend. It prevents you from sending the first thing you wrote after some glasses of whiskey to agents and to burn your name forever. This feeling won't go away. I'm a published writer and journalist and I still feel like a failure most of the time. Writing is hard. Writing is a ...


1

No honest attempt is ever wasted. At worst, you've practiced your skills and learned that this one didn't work at this time in this place. And remember that many good stories were rejected by everyone the first time they were circulated, or were conceptually fine but the author's skills weren't yet up to doing them justice and were more successful later ...


1

Unfortunately, if you can't face rejection of your work, you can't be a writer. The sad truth is even the most successful writers have all had the experience of being at one time or another critically panned, rejected or otherwise. As the saying goes, if you can give up writing, do so, if you can't... you're doomed to be a writer! One thing that can help, ...



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