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22

There are myriad questions on this site that already address this issue, and the consensus is always the same. Just write. Write for yourself. Don't even read what you've written. Don't even look back as you're writing. Write until you're finished. Once you're finished, look back over your work. Only then can you begin to be critical of style, ...


11

I suffer from this all the time. My wife says I always write better to a deadline, but I struggle to figure out how to set deadlines and stick them. Some ideas I've been thinking about: Get someone you know to set a deadline for you, and behave as if you're writing for them. Find writing competitions on-line and write towards meeting that deadline. You may ...


10

From 7 creative principles of Pixar: 1) Never come up with just one idea. Regardless of whether you want to write a book, design a piece of furniture or make an animated movie: At the beginning, don't start with just one idea - it should be three. The reason is simple. If a producer comes to me with a proposal for a new project, then usually he has mulled ...


10

Why do you want to be a writer? No offense, seriously. But for me, I want to write because stories come to me and need to be written. It's not "I want to be writer" so then I have to struggle with how to be a writer and then struggle with what I want to say (since writers have to say something) and then struggle with story ideas, all so I can be a 'writer'. ...


6

Let me reach for that resource and hope I don't sink in the process... For The Evulz - he's a destructive force, a person who "likes to watch the world burn". No deeper reasons, no hate, no revenge. Simple love for destruction. One I can't find the trope for, "Burn down a national park to steal a bag of french fries": the disaster and resulting chaos was ...


6

I think there are two reasons you might be procrastinating on the scene: You are afraid of doing it wrong (in that case follow Lauren Ipsum's advice). It's boring and you don't feel like writing it. If it's the second choice I suggest the following: a. Remove the scene. I know it hurts. But something I realized is that progress is not how many words you ...


5

Tell your friends, family, spouse that you will finish your novel in October, 15th (or whatever). Or tell it only your first draft readers. They will expect your work to be finished then. They will nag. You have a deadline.


5

Some possibilities: It was an accident. This would give him something to cope with. He works at the site, and his neglect or incompetence or other personal failing caused the problem or made it worse. He works at the site. He tried to get his superiors' attention about problems at the site. Though he did not cause the accident, he believes that he allowed ...


4

You're letting the perfect become the enemy of the good. You know it's a critical scene, and you're scared to screw it up. That's reasonable. The problem is that you're so scared of screwing it up that you can't even let yourself start, because you're afraid of "breaking it." Rationally, of course, you know that you can edit, rewrite, or start over. But ...


3

Started a nuclear disaster, potential for otherworldly elements — I'd say he's a fanatic trying to bring about the end of the world so that aliens will swoop down and rescue him. No seriously. The guy doesn't have to be sane. The chain of logic can make perfect sense in his own head (sort of a cross of Heaven's Gate, Rapture-awaiting evangelicals, and ...


2

Writing something every day can be a huge boost. For facilitating this, I've recently become a big fan of 750words.com, but anything you do to get yourself in the daily habit would work just as effectively.


2

Hum, good question, sometime motivation is hard but I can at least try to provide some answers to your three main questions. 1: Give your self permission to suck. Nothing is going to be easy the first go through, that's what rewrites and edits fore. Accept that it's not going to be the best and write it anyways, knowing that the more you write the better ...


2

I wrote a novel a couple years ago and I have two pieces of advice for the beginning steps. 1) You need an idea. 2) You need to persist. The idea is everything, an idea that you can hold onto and that guides the entire story like a lighthouse. The idea could be something very small: a plot, a scene, a character, a feeling, a theme - anything that inspires ...


1

You want motivation? Set deadlines. I am a great fan of National Novel Writing Month, a challenge to write a 50,000 word novel in the month of November. It has the advantage of being large and well-organised, but setting yourself a firm deadline on your own might work. If self-imposed deadlines don't work, then spend the next few months planning your story ...


1

If you need the heart attack feeling of an approaching deadline to turn in good work how about setting interim deadlines, in effect multiple mini heart attacks? Failing that you can give yourself a daily reminder (or nag) by going to habitforge and set up a daily email reminder. This will ask you if you did what you said you'd do by answering only yes or ...


1

This is a common problem. I myself conquered this only last year. There is no one reason and no two writers suffer from the same set of reasons in the same proportion. But here are some things to try out: Freewriting exercises - Whenever you feel like it, open up your note book or your word processor and just start writing. Start with any old nonsensical ...


1

I think the problem is that writing is work. The stuff you call 'prep work' is essentially daydreaming. All the usual suggestions will apply here, I think. Set a daily or weekly goal for yourself - an hour a day of writing, or five thousand words a week, or whatever seems challenging but achievable. If you have nothing to say, you can sit there and write ...



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