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Those are basically two of the most common options, yes. Below are the ones that I know: Fee: This is typical for articles, short stories and poems submitted to magazines (when there is payment offered). You get either a one-time flat fee or a per-word fee for first publication rights in that periodical. Contract Writing: This is typical for large ...


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Check out Author Earnings. There are lots of debates about the collection, meaning, and significance of the data, but there's plenty of data.


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It's very difficult to have hard answers for questions like this because there are way too many variables. "Traditional" publishing is not a monolith - there's a lot of difference between publishing with the Big 5 and publishing with a small e-publisher, and a lot of difference between publishing with a reputable, established e-publisher and a fly-by-night ...


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Im not so sure your issue is with the content of your paragraph, people generally only donate money to causes they believe in, your interest in buying gadgets to help in your education is admirable, but you have to look from the users perspective. What are they getting out of it. When people donate to cancer research or homes for retired seeing eye dogs, ...


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I quit a job at one point to write full-time, and ended up writing far less when I had more time. Since then, my general advice to anyone is to establish the new career BEFORE leaving the old one. Scott Adams (creator of Dilbert) was already making millions off his strip before he left his former job as a cubicle-dweller (laid off, fwiw). As mentioned ...


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Writing books isn't the only way to write professionally. If your goal is simply to write and earn a living from it rather than to produce a book, business writing can be a lucrative option. You don't have as much freedom to choose what you write, but you are guaranteed a paycheck for what you produce. I know one woman who does this in the financial sector ...


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Most of the answers mentioned here are accurate. I would like to add my 2 cents. If you have financial commitments, then don't risk losing out on your current job. That's your bread and butter. Assuming you have a five day week, focus 100% on your job in the weekdays. On the weekends, put work aside, find a nice quite time of the day and start your word ...


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The Kindle Direct Publishing contract says that you will not make your book available elsewhere for a lower price. So if your book is available on a web site for free, you can't sell it for more than $0.00 on Amazon. If they find your book available at a lower price, they will drop the Kindle price to match it. And they will scold you. I don't know whether ...


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A good thought for you may be what would be appropriate were I a major published writer and wanted to give away copies that the contract publisher will receive no commission from. There is a single yet albeit unconfusing answer that will be answered in a publishing contract. Yet while selling at your personal expense while giving out free copies you are a ...


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Unfortunately, there isn't an exact answer. It depends on so many things: your agent, your publisher, your book, etc. Some people are getting $500 advances. Others get seven digit advances. It depends a lot of factors and there is no one answer. Also, just so you know, for non-fiction, you don't sell your book. You sell your book proposal. You'll approach ...


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What kind of book? I have most experience with novels... I think things are a bit different for non-fiction, but I can't say for sure. For novels... Authors don't get paid per word. That applies to some short story markets, and, I think to non-fiction articles, but not novels. For novels, authors are paid royalties based on sales. This can be either net ...



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