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22

This article shows an example breakdown of the costs involved in making a hardcover book: Based on a list price of $27.95 $3.55 - Pre-preduction - This amount covers editors, graphic designers, and the like $2.83 - Printing - Ink, glue, paper, etc $2.00 - Marketing - Book tour, NYT Book Review ad, printing and shipping galleys to journalists ...


17

Writers being paid 'by the word' is kind of a misnomer. Many writers are paid more for longer pieces - reflecting the author's investment - but writers are never paid to pad or extend their work. The confusion seems to be mostly relevant to journalism, where word count is important because space in a magazine or newspaper is literally limited. When an ...


16

Writing is mostly a long-term profession. For most professional writers, writing is a long-term prospect. You are unlikely to make much money from one book, or five. Of course, unlikely is not the same as impossible. What makes a professional career work: A reader reads one of your books, enjoys it, searches for another one, and finds one. So to make a ...


15

A NYT Bestseller Probably you'll make a good bit here, but generally, if you make it this far, it's not going to be your first book, and you're going to have worked it out contractually before hand. Mind you, you can be on the list for selling ~5000(hardcover) copies a week. If you write something that makes the list, you'll probably bring down $50,000+, ...


14

Slow and steady wins the race. Cliché's out the way (although I do think it's true), one of the things I find with writing is that you should always stick to what you're comfortable with, unless you're finding it detrimental to your writing. So, if you're doing 250 words/hour, and feel that's too slow, then I would suggest you set yourself an easy target. ...


13

Officially, the reason to incorporate is to protect your personal assets if someone decides to sue you over your writing. If you're incorporated, they would instead have to sue the corporation, and your personal property can't be touched. My own reason for incorporating was to get access to only-somewhat-ridiculously-priced health insurance. Buying health ...


9

What you're thinking of is vanity publishing. A vanity publishing house is one that will publish your book, but you pay all of the costs. You pay for the marketing, the editing, the cover art, etc. Basically all they do is print the book and put it in stores for you. And to be honest, if you go this route, you're going to be laughed at in the publishing ...


9

INT. STARBUCKS, LOS ANGELES People are sitting at tables and on couches, some on smartphones, many typing away on laptops. We pan to a man in his 40's, with a ponytail and reading glasses. He is concentrating fiercely, reading something on a Macbook. JOE (looks up at camera): Oh, hello there! I didn't see you. Welcome to Screenwriter's Corner. Today we ...


8

Maybe. If, for some unforeseen reason, the book is cancelled between the time the contract is signed and the publication date, the publisher may request that any paid-out portion of the advance be repaid. For instance, it might happen if the first half of the book is amazing, but the second half is a complete turkey. Or if the second half never gets ...


8

No. That's the meaning of the word "advance": these are monies that the publisher is willing to give you up-front with the belief that your work will sell enough copies to cover the advance. Keep in mind that the advance is not "free money": it's a portion of the royalties for your book that you receive ahead of time. You won't receive any further royalties ...


8

I just joined the site, so you may have already acted on this, but I would definitely recommend going with self-publishing, as long as you don't use a subsidy or vanity publisher. You can go to sites like Kindle Direct Publishing, Smashwords, or Barnes&Noble and find information on self-publishing e-books or go to CreateSpace for print books. All of ...


8

They do not quit their day job. That's true for many other writers, too. But besides that, yes, they get paid for unused scripts if these scripts were optioned. I. e. a producer pays them money for the exclusive right to the script for a certain amount of time. During that time the producer can think about turning it into a movie without fearing that a ...


7

eBooks only really "exploded" in sales over the last couple of years, so there likely isn't enough data yet to be able to accurately say what periods of the year would be best for eBooks. eBooks may not follow the same trends as normal books, after all. I'm not sure if people are as likely to buy an eBook as a gift for a friend as they are to actually buy a ...


7

Quotes from real people and books are generally considered fair use so they can be used without paying anyone. Song lyrics and poems are a gray area. Some people will tell you you can use portions of song lyrics - a line or two - but others will say you can't use any without permission. If you're not using the whole song, you'd probably be able to get ...


7

Are you really looking for a collaborator, or just someone to illustrate your vision? That can affect how you search. Sometimes I hire illustrators and I have something very, very specific in mind that I simply want executed. Other times, I have a general guide and I want them to put their own spin on it and give me options, come up with ideas. Being clear ...


7

I have two answers here, both from established writers. These are not necessarily any sort of average, but more they are specific cases to understand where you could stand. Lynn Viehl had a 100k print run and a NYT bestseller in fiction. She wrote about her experience here and here, and I'm waiting on the next one. She received a $50k advance, with sales of ...


6

It really, really depends on your contract. There may be some situations, such as you refuse to edit the book or make requested changes and the publisher cancels the contract. The best idea? Negotiate with your publisher so that the advance (against royalties) is yours. If you're contract isn't clear enough about this, press for it to be made more clear.


6

Usually a writer will include books that they either read or referred to as part of their research for their own book. Even though they may not quote specific passages from the original source, they are making sure that the reader knows that they had to seek additional information on one or more topics within their own book. They are not necessarily ...


6

Since many books are written based on an advance to the author from the publisher, I imagine there's also a component of them trying to regain that advance earlier in the sales cycle.


6

That is a marketing ploy that they are using to claim that they provide royalties that might be considered to be higher than the average royalties paid by other publishers. Considering that these royalties are usually pretty meager at best anyway, that probably isn't much of a claim! As far as determining what the industry average really is, it would ...


6

Download a random ebook from Amazon, or read a random blog, and you will see that most writers are not ready for prime time. (In the old days, they got screened out by agents and publishers, so this wasn't so obvious.) It's not that most writers are awful (although some are), but they fall short in critical areas. Their writing is charming, but hokey. Or ...


5

In nearly all cases where you're writing a webcomic, you are going to want a true collaborator. Comics are a visual storytelling medium, as evidenced by the fact that you can have a comic that has pictures but no text, but you can't really have a comic that is text without pictures. This person is going to be helping you to tell your story and should ideally ...


5

Generally speaking, if a pubisher gives you an advance against royalties, and then publishes your book, and the book doesn't sell well, you don't have to refund the advance. This is the normal understanding of an "advance" in the world of trade publishing. But read your contract carefully before you sign it.


5

I suspect the sort of company you are looking for isn't out there, but I will happily retract my answer if someone can point out an example. I would be interested to find out such a company exists. What you're looking for seems to be along the lines of the standard self-publishing model, but with two caveats: The ability to attract investors for a book ...


5

You've gotten plenty of negative answers here, which, I am sad to say, are accurate. The unfortunate truth is that writing is a horribly unrewarding profession. The fact of the matter is that, no matter how you slice it, most writers do not make enough money to support themselves from their writing. And when I say most writers, I mean literally ALMOST ALL ...


4

I can't really comment accurately on your particular examples, but royalties and payments can become quite complicated. For example, there is often an advance against royalties to consider initially. This advance is up-front money for the author, and is typically paid when the book goes to print. I have read that publishers will often shoot for an advance ...


4

This question appears to have an implied assumption that there are two types of freelance writing: Print: High profile literary work that's difficult to get (aka “real writing”) Example: writing for the New Yorker Online: low paying and low respect, but work that's easy to do/get Example: blogging for other people for pennies/post If those were the only ...



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