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This (pdf guide by Austin Peay State University) states the following about citing the same source multiple time in the same paragraph: When citing a source the first time, use the author’s name(s) unless the name is used as part of the sentence that introduces the source’s text. Example: The expert of writing claims, “MLA Style of formatting is ...


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According to page two of this guide, it is acceptable to put the references at the end. Using my previous example. Mrs. Miller lives a lonely life, having “no friends to speak of” , “narrow” interests and rarely travelling “farther than the corner grocery” (Capote 2).


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You must quote the source that you read, not the original publication, if they differ. Some style manuals require that you give the original publication date, e.g. in MLA: Bacon, Francis. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation". 1625. Essays. Ed. Michael J. Hawkins. London: J. M. Dent, 1973. pp-pp. Print. Replace "pp" with the appropriate page numbers. And ...


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When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that ...


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That would be a nice scenario to use ibid., but sadly that's discouraged in MLA. I'm surprised that you can omit them in APA, but so what. Be aware why marking the citations is needed: to distinguish your ideas from the ones you borrowed. So if the paragraph includes your sentences embedded with in-text citations, you should mark each sentence ...



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