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4

I answer your question for APA. Psychological papers are very rigidly formatted, so possibly you have more leeway when following MLA, but I would suspect that the basics still apply. To answer your question, we must first understand what the purpose of the headings is. To understand that, let's take a step back and look at the paper's title. The APA Manual ...


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Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


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It depends on what is in between quote x from Ferguson and y quote from Ferguson. If there is no quotes in between x and y then you can just refer the page number and if there is a quote in between you need to refer to the source again. Also, if there is no sentences between x and y you can just refer to the source after y. However, I personally tend to stay ...


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From what I remember, the standard way to separate two citations like this would be to include the year in the citation. EG: "This is quote one" ("Alternative Energy" 2007), and "this is quote two" ("Alternative Energy" 2015). I cannot cite a source for this, though, as I have not used MLA in years and do not have a copy of the handbook available.


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You (probably) don't. It is unlikely that a film made in the 1950s saw its first release on YouTube. You wouldn't cite an ebook as published on some torrent site, you wouldn't cite music as published on some file sharing site, and similarly you would not (usually) cite a film as being published on a video sharing site such as YouTube. You would give ...


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If your source of information was the YouTube video, then you cite the YouTube video. If you're using some specific style guide -- MLA or APA or whatever -- follow their format for citing a web site. If not, make up something consistent with what you're using for paper sources.


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I hate to just answer with links, but this resource is invaluable: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/


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When a subsequent quotation is from the same work as the previous one, a page number is enough: In Bob Foo's novel Living the Internet Life, the protagonist is posting comments on websites. His first comment is met with enthusiastic upvoting (34). The protagonist is happy and decides to post more comments (38).


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MLA style guide recommends the following when it comes to referencing other works in your title: Use quotation marks and/or italics when referring to other works in your title, just as you would in your text: Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Morality Play; Human Weariness in "After Apple Picking"


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According to page two of this guide, it is acceptable to put the references at the end. Using my previous example. Mrs. Miller lives a lonely life, having “no friends to speak of” , “narrow” interests and rarely travelling “farther than the corner grocery” (Capote 2).


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The following is quoted from Harvard Guide to Using Sources When you are citing an edition of a book other than the first edition, you should indicate the edition. In both MLA and APA styles, you should identify the edition you are citing by year or number (if either is available), or by name (if the edition is listed as "revised" or "abridged"). ...



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