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15

You cite a source because it gives additional information that a curious reader may want to follow up on. So: If your prior paper gives additional information (data, methods, background, conclusions, further citations, etc.) that is not in your current paper, but which may be of interest to readers, cite it. By the way, you're not citing yourself; you're ...


6

In North America it should look like this: "'Look,' Mother said, 'there's a price to paid for freedom; we pay it now or we're in "ball and chain" forever.'"


5

This is called quoting from an indirect source. And, yes, if you don't take your quotations from the original source, you need to acknowledge the intermediary. This is in part to recognize the work that person did, but also to protect yourself in case that person misquoted the original source. I don't know the audience for your work, so I don't know which ...


4

Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


4

The MLA has a section on graphic novels. Basically, you cite the source in the same way as a regular non-periodical publication. If it's a single author, yes, you would use (Author, Page) format. See the Purdue OWL online writing lab for details on MLA format. See also this site for specific information on how to form graphic novel citations in your Works ...


4

Italicized: Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Ed. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine. New York: Washington Square-Pocket, 1992. I just searched for examples. I found this site: http://www.mystfx.ca/resources/writingcentre/MLA_Citing%20Sources.pdf, and I used that info. I think that most scripts of plays are republished in books or collections (which are ...


3

Citing the GCMS High School Media Center (highlighted by me) Changes must not be made in the spelling, capitalization, or punctuation of the quote. So it looks like you have to find another way.


3

MLA guidelines suggest that, when citing an entire work, "it is best to paraphrase the information being used. This way, the author's name (or the name of the work, if it is anonymous), is mentioned in the sentence, but there is no need for particular documentation at the end of the sentence." The example given is as follows: Turner's study served to ...


2

I don't know if the rules for citing from speech are any different from those of citing from text, however, if you are to cite something or someone verbatim, you need to put it in quotes, if not also as a separate paragraph. In cases where the article/object of the quote is tacit, you may place it in square brackets as part of the quote. This also applies ...


2

One way to go at this would be to treat it like any other writing assignment. Include the book you are reviewing in your Works Cited list, in MLA or whatever format your professor prefers. Then in the paper, when quoting or paraphrasing, you can use a parenthetical like (Surname 71). Unless the book's chapters are extremely short, a one-paragraph summary of ...


2

I paraphrased this from Robert Harris' MLA In-Text Citation Style, November 2010. It is based on the Seventh Edition of MLA for Research Writers, 2009, which remains the most current version. Harris distinguishes between a web page and a database. Here is the standard for a web page, or web address, as the question requested. Last name, First name. ...


2

The OWL at Purdue is my go-to source for MLA information. Check their page for electronic sources, or their home page.


2

Note that these are discussions about style, not something like grammar; as such, there is no "correct" or "incorrect" way among the different choices. The best thing is to pick one style and stick to it. And, APA and MLA are just two out of dozens of commonly used styles of citation. When considering which style to follow, you should also consider the ...


2

You probably want to break the quote up with words of your own, if you're using two distinct lines of dialogue. eg. This absurdist humour is evident when Character X goes to great lengths to explain "Blahblahblah," and Person Y responds with a dry "Floopdeloop" (MLA citation). If there are important physical actions that are not conveyed in the dialogue, ...


2

This (pdf guide by Austin Peay State University) states the following about citing the same source multiple time in the same paragraph: When citing a source the first time, use the author’s name(s) unless the name is used as part of the sentence that introduces the source’s text. Example: The expert of writing claims, “MLA Style of formatting is ...


1

According to page two of this guide, it is acceptable to put the references at the end. Using my previous example. Mrs. Miller lives a lonely life, having “no friends to speak of” , “narrow” interests and rarely travelling “farther than the corner grocery” (Capote 2).


1

You must quote the source that you read, not the original publication, if they differ. Some style manuals require that you give the original publication date, e.g. in MLA: Bacon, Francis. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation". 1625. Essays. Ed. Michael J. Hawkins. London: J. M. Dent, 1973. pp-pp. Print. Replace "pp" with the appropriate page numbers. And ...


1

When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that ...


1

That would be a nice scenario to use ibid., but sadly that's discouraged in MLA. I'm surprised that you can omit them in APA, but so what. Be aware why marking the citations is needed: to distinguish your ideas from the ones you borrowed. So if the paragraph includes your sentences embedded with in-text citations, you should mark each sentence ...


1

You can cite it just as you would any other online video: Author. "Title of Web Page." Title of the Site. Editor. Date and/or Version Number. Name of Sponsoring Institution. Date of Access <URL>. Or, you may choose to cite it as a film or video recording and put the emphasis on the performer: Last, First Name, their participation. Title. ...


1

The usual approach is to write both the citation (marked up either with quotes or italics) and its reference with the natural flow, making them visually distinct but semantically following the flow of text seamlessly: As the DK-Handbook recommends, you need to give readers information about the source. How exactly you present the source depends on how ...


1

I just checked my copy of MLA Handbook and I find no guidance on this case. The only example it gives has a single name. (I'll readily yield to someone who can point out that I missed something.) Given that, I'd just say, "Do something sensible." It's conventional in other instances, like footnotes, to separate names with commas, so that's what I'd do. Of ...


1

From memory (and this is quite a long time ago - since finishing my first degree I've used Turabian style rather than MLA), you are correct to use full names (first name before surname), in alphabetical order, separated by commas on a single line. Do you have a copy of the MLA Style Manual? I'd strongly recommend it if you are going to be using MLA style ...


1

If you are referring to a select section of a quote, mentioned previously or not, you would place an ellipse from where it was selected: "One day at the end of the fall when I was out where the oak forest had been I saw a cloud coming over the mountain." (Else where in the text) "...I saw a cloud coming over the mountain." This ellipse would ...


1

MLA doesn't specify how to format articles with foreign titles, but for books it specifies that you should include a translation of the title after the foreign title, and it should be italicized and in brackets. I'd say it's safe to adopt the same convention for articles. In either case, the first title should be the foreign language title as it is ...


1

After reading your question I did a little search and discovered this: Use present tense to introduce cited or quoted material and to make personal comments on such materials. Use past tense only when directly quoting a passage that is in past tense or when reporting historical events. This answers the question of why "pass" was corrected to ...


1

I would just put it in your works cited page. If the lyric is popular enough ("Hit me, baby, one more time", for example), your reader will probably know where the lyric is from without even having to read the back of your essay. Otherwise, a simple mention will cover you from any angry Oasis lawyers :)


1

I agree with Wolfpack. For future reference, the general rule is that if the work comes in multiple parts, (chapters, acts, scenes... whatever) then the title is italicized. If it comes in only one part (short story, article, etc.) then it gets quotation marks. Of course, there are articles that have multiple parts, and plays that have only one scene, so ...



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