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15

You cite a source because it gives additional information that a curious reader may want to follow up on. So: If your prior paper gives additional information (data, methods, background, conclusions, further citations, etc.) that is not in your current paper, but which may be of interest to readers, cite it. By the way, you're not citing yourself; you're ...


6

In North America it should look like this: "'Look,' Mother said, 'there's a price to paid for freedom; we pay it now or we're in "ball and chain" forever.'"


5

This is called quoting from an indirect source. And, yes, if you don't take your quotations from the original source, you need to acknowledge the intermediary. This is in part to recognize the work that person did, but also to protect yourself in case that person misquoted the original source. I don't know the audience for your work, so I don't know which ...


4

I answer your question for APA. Psychological papers are very rigidly formatted, so possibly you have more leeway when following MLA, but I would suspect that the basics still apply. To answer your question, we must first understand what the purpose of the headings is. To understand that, let's take a step back and look at the paper's title. The APA Manual ...


4

Italicized: Shakespeare, William. Hamlet. Ed. Barbara A. Mowat and Paul Werstine. New York: Washington Square-Pocket, 1992. I just searched for examples. I found this site: http://www.mystfx.ca/resources/writingcentre/MLA_Citing%20Sources.pdf, and I used that info. I think that most scripts of plays are republished in books or collections (which are ...


4

Definitely - not just a phrase but at least a paragraph discussing the language, possibly detailing some characteristic points of it, early on. Also note - they aren't necessarily errors. That's a dialect, and as long as the spelling and grammar is true to that dialect, it's not erroneous; it just isn't Standard English. Think of it as quotations in a ...


4

The MLA has a section on graphic novels. Basically, you cite the source in the same way as a regular non-periodical publication. If it's a single author, yes, you would use (Author, Page) format. See the Purdue OWL online writing lab for details on MLA format. See also this site for specific information on how to form graphic novel citations in your Works ...


4

In MLA citation, the author is put before the website. Lastname, Firstname. "Title." Website Title (Italics). Publisher, Date Month Year of publication. Web. Date month year of access. If there is no author, just omit the author and begin the citation with "Title.


3

Citing the GCMS High School Media Center (highlighted by me) Changes must not be made in the spelling, capitalization, or punctuation of the quote. So it looks like you have to find another way.


3

MLA guidelines suggest that, when citing an entire work, "it is best to paraphrase the information being used. This way, the author's name (or the name of the work, if it is anonymous), is mentioned in the sentence, but there is no need for particular documentation at the end of the sentence." The example given is as follows: Turner's study served to ...


3

Consider how your reader will use the book. In an academic work (which this is not), readers: are likely to already be familiar with the cited works (they're also researchers in this field, after all) will rely on the works you cite to evaluate your work (they care about those citations) read lots of such articles and welcome a consistent style ...


2

I don't know if the rules for citing from speech are any different from those of citing from text, however, if you are to cite something or someone verbatim, you need to put it in quotes, if not also as a separate paragraph. In cases where the article/object of the quote is tacit, you may place it in square brackets as part of the quote. This also applies ...


2

I paraphrased this from Robert Harris' MLA In-Text Citation Style, November 2010. It is based on the Seventh Edition of MLA for Research Writers, 2009, which remains the most current version. Harris distinguishes between a web page and a database. Here is the standard for a web page, or web address, as the question requested. Last name, First name. ...


2

Note that these are discussions about style, not something like grammar; as such, there is no "correct" or "incorrect" way among the different choices. The best thing is to pick one style and stick to it. And, APA and MLA are just two out of dozens of commonly used styles of citation. When considering which style to follow, you should also consider the ...


2

One way to go at this would be to treat it like any other writing assignment. Include the book you are reviewing in your Works Cited list, in MLA or whatever format your professor prefers. Then in the paper, when quoting or paraphrasing, you can use a parenthetical like (Surname 71). Unless the book's chapters are extremely short, a one-paragraph summary of ...


2

You probably want to break the quote up with words of your own, if you're using two distinct lines of dialogue. eg. This absurdist humour is evident when Character X goes to great lengths to explain "Blahblahblah," and Person Y responds with a dry "Floopdeloop" (MLA citation). If there are important physical actions that are not conveyed in the dialogue, ...


2

The OWL at Purdue is my go-to source for MLA information. Check their page for electronic sources, or their home page.


2

This (pdf guide by Austin Peay State University) states the following about citing the same source multiple time in the same paragraph: When citing a source the first time, use the author’s name(s) unless the name is used as part of the sentence that introduces the source’s text. Example: The expert of writing claims, “MLA Style of formatting is ...


2

The following is quoted from Harvard Guide to Using Sources When you are citing an edition of a book other than the first edition, you should indicate the edition. In both MLA and APA styles, you should identify the edition you are citing by year or number (if either is available), or by name (if the edition is listed as "revised" or "abridged"). ...


2

It depends on what is in between quote x from Ferguson and y quote from Ferguson. If there is no quotes in between x and y then you can just refer the page number and if there is a quote in between you need to refer to the source again. Also, if there is no sentences between x and y you can just refer to the source after y. However, I personally tend to stay ...


2

You (probably) don't. It is unlikely that a film made in the 1950s saw its first release on YouTube. You wouldn't cite an ebook as published on some torrent site, you wouldn't cite music as published on some file sharing site, and similarly you would not (usually) cite a film as being published on a video sharing site such as YouTube. You would give ...


2

From what I remember, the standard way to separate two citations like this would be to include the year in the citation. EG: "This is quote one" ("Alternative Energy" 2007), and "this is quote two" ("Alternative Energy" 2015). I cannot cite a source for this, though, as I have not used MLA in years and do not have a copy of the handbook available.


2

Most Modern Christian works use footnotes except for scripture which is always cited inline. Early works which predate modern citation styles use the author's name or the common identifier for a work when an author was known for more than one work, as many works had no titles, page numbers or publishers in a narrative citation style (the citation, what there ...


2

According to this Pitts Theology Library Research Guide, The two styles most commonly used in theology are SBL and Chicago style. It is important to note that SBL style suggests that users check the Chicago Manual if a question is not specifically answered in the SBL Handbook. SBL Handbook of Style: For Ancient Near Eastern, Biblical, and Early ...


1

If you are referring to a select section of a quote, mentioned previously or not, you would place an ellipse from where it was selected: "One day at the end of the fall when I was out where the oak forest had been I saw a cloud coming over the mountain." (Else where in the text) "...I saw a cloud coming over the mountain." This ellipse would ...


1

According to page two of this guide, it is acceptable to put the references at the end. Using my previous example. Mrs. Miller lives a lonely life, having “no friends to speak of” , “narrow” interests and rarely travelling “farther than the corner grocery” (Capote 2).


1

You must quote the source that you read, not the original publication, if they differ. Some style manuals require that you give the original publication date, e.g. in MLA: Bacon, Francis. "Of Simulation and Dissimulation". 1625. Essays. Ed. Michael J. Hawkins. London: J. M. Dent, 1973. pp-pp. Print. Replace "pp" with the appropriate page numbers. And ...


1

When using the MLA guideline and quoting a text, if you are introducing any modifications into the quotation, mark the same by placing square brackets [ ] at the appropriate spot. For example (adapted from here) Original quotation: "Reading is also a process and it also changes you." 1) Margaret Atwood wants her readers to realize that ...


1

That would be a nice scenario to use ibid., but sadly that's discouraged in MLA. I'm surprised that you can omit them in APA, but so what. Be aware why marking the citations is needed: to distinguish your ideas from the ones you borrowed. So if the paragraph includes your sentences embedded with in-text citations, you should mark each sentence ...


1

You can cite it just as you would any other online video: Author. "Title of Web Page." Title of the Site. Editor. Date and/or Version Number. Name of Sponsoring Institution. Date of Access <URL>. Or, you may choose to cite it as a film or video recording and put the emphasis on the performer: Last, First Name, their participation. Title. ...



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