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5

Unfortunately- no. A ROI would suggest that just the "skills" learned are the only skills needed. If one intends to be a "writer" there are considerations such as "creativity" and being in "the right place at the right time" that the MFA doesn't even attempt to teach. Yes, the same could be said for other degrees but the fact of the matter is that a ...


3

Perhaps the two most important criteria are faculty whose writing you like and who get good recommendations as teachers guaranteed funding for students (through teaching or otherwise) If you're already wealthy, you can skip #2.


3

You can start by searching universities, rankings for MFA programs, and in general, advice from experienced people on how to choose programs (Google is your best friend here). In the end, I think you will have to settle on your own criteria after considering what the others have to say.


3

No one was ever published strictly because they had an MFA. If you wish to be a writer, then writing should be your first goal. If you wish to get on as an editor somewhere, show your editing experience. An MFA may get you in the door for a low-level position in publishing, but it's more likely that you will need other connections. This question reminds me ...


3

I think to some extent, you CAN simplify it the same way as for an MBA, because there are so many other (free or low cost) ways to improve your writing. So what does the program offer, other than the letters? I guess it gives structure and discipline. There ARE other ways to improve your writing, but maybe some writers want to be given assignments and ...


3

An MFA would come in handy when working in the publishing world. A lot of editors for publishing houses have MFAs and even owners of publishing houses occasionally have them. I know at least one of the editors at the primary house I work for has one and I'll be pursuing an MFA myself. Not only does the experience often help editors, it gives the publishing ...


2

I applied to an MFA program as a side-option last year, and I am about 90% per cent certain that I read this somewhere on the department's site/admissions portal. (The 10% uncertainty comes from not being able to recall where exactly, maybe on a FAQ somewhere). Paraphrased: Our students usually are able to find part time work as editors for ...


2

As far as I've been able to ascertain through the years the "educational" institutions are about the only place that the MFA carries any weight. In a way I'm glad I didn't go for one decades ago.


2

A good reputation amongst actual recent alumni is the most telling factor, I've found. Most universities' published ratings can be a bit outdated and/or based on criteria that looks more impressive on paper than in the actual classroom. That said, a program's worth is often subjective, relative to what the student is looking to gain. Some programs have a ...


2

The Creative Writing MFA Handbook has a lot of useful tips for students interested in a creative writing MFA, including what to look for in, and how to pick, MFA programs.


1

Get an MFA if you want to teach. There's some palpable ROI. Don't bother if you want to write. When it comes to writing, getting an MFA isn't going to improve your skill that much more than self-study. If you're intelligent enough to write well, you're intelligent enough to learn it on your own, with a writing group, and via one-off workshops. Ultimately, ...



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