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Besides my comment above about referencing the wrong item, in a more general sense, you can make a metaphor clearer by working backwards from your end result. If your end is "silence is golden," which is the important idea you want to reference, consider what part of a person makes sound. It's not really the lips, but the mouth. (I wouldn't use "golden ...


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Having read lauren Ipsum's comments, I am hesitant to build upon a metaphor you may be abandoning, still confronting obscurity in lyrics seems worthy of some effort. I disagree with the idea that obscurity should be welcome in lyrics. All writing, whether literary or lyrical, should strive to clearly communicate ideas. Anything short of that, sucks all ...


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It's unlikely anyone will make that connection unaided, but, speaking as a big fan of lyrics, it's not necessarily a problem if people don't understand everything in your lyrics. Even more than is the case for ordinary poetry, a large part of successful lyrics is the raw sound of the words. Many great songs have been written with lyrics that presumably ...


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This answer is in three parts: Part 1 - Historical Denotations and Connotations of Smooch. A grounding in the meaning and usage of the word smooch in that time period is necessary to discuss the concept further. Part 2: Literary Interpretation of "The Smooch" This provides my answer to the question. (Hint: Yes, "smooch" has a significant literary and ...


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A look in a dictionary will tell you that smooch can mean: a "smuch" or "smear" (noun); to "sully", "dirty" (verb) "kiss" (either as verb or noun). It seems to originate from German schmatzen (via eng. smouch), a verb meaning the sound made by eating, kissing or boots moving in mud. Smooch is an onomatopoeia (a word imitating the sound it denotes). to ...



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