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8

To John's point, Fantasy and Sci-fi usually take place on made up worlds. Other novels take place anywhere from big cities like Hong Kong, New York, London, Toronto or small cities, sometimes in well known places and sometimes in "exotic" locations (what is exotic depends on your audience). I think when you base a story in a lesser known environment ...


7

If money and time is not a problem, then why shouldn't you? It can't hurt. The big benefit of a personal website is that you can list all your stories there (what answers the question what you should put there ;)). So you have one page where you can link to in your e-books or mention the URL in your paper books. If the reader liked your story he can go to ...


7

I'm not clear on whether you see this is a pitch session (i.e., with the explicit goal of interesting the publisher in your novel), or simply an opportunity for a one-on-one conversation. Either way, though, I think the best way to go here (and to get through your nervousness) is to take this excellent advice from Janet Reid, classily entitled: Pitch ...


5

1) Leave comments: There are many film review blogs. Comment under their reviews. Like: "Interestingly, we have really different view on quality of the movie. some detail from your review" Btw, The comments should be on topic, interesting and not bragging ones. Everyone hates "hey, visit my awesome blog!" comment 2) Do giveaways and promos Do you have ...


5

The answer to this question is simple: there is no minimum recommended length. Write the best damn story you can possibly write, regardless of length. Put every ounce of blood, sweat and tears into it. Forget to eat, lose sleep, neglect your family — truly immerse yourself into the book. Then you edit, re-edit and maybe edit some more until you are left ...


3

I'm going to add some things to the already great answer given by Pavel above. 1) Have a Twitter box and Facebook box. I want to follow you on Twitter or like you on Facebook, but you're not doing anything to help me. I have to search for your Twitter handle on Google and for most people that's just cumbersome. I can't even get to your Facebook page btw. ...


3

I think that the majority of readers want to identify with the characters, setting and events of a story. That is why fiction featuring common characters taking place in well-known places and dealing with problems everyone encounters are the most popular. Of course all novels have an element that is uncommon and not everyday, like the murder, the stranger, ...


3

In the U.S., anyone can sue anyone. That doesn't mean they win, and you can counter-sue for your damages incurred defending against a baseless lawsuit. Plus, of course, most celebs wouldn't want to be seen as bullies. Stick to the facts and you will be fine. However, start injecting your opinions in there, and you could get into trouble. This is ...


3

Dean Wesley Smith famously advises against pricing anything at $0.99. That's the discount bin. It tells buyers that it's a cheap read, not that it's a good read. Why not price your book as if you expected readers to want it? Here is a bunch of advice from Dean about indie pricing: http://www.deanwesleysmith.com/?tag=pricing


2

You may be interested in this competition link for a novella. http://griffithreview.com/the-novella-project-2-call-for-submissions


2

As @Standback said in his comment, you might want to consider a publishing scedule, instead of a writing schedule. When readers finish your book, and they liked it, they will want to read more from you. If there is nothing, they will move on to another author and forget you, before your next book comes out. You will have to do all your marketing from zero ...


2

15 minutes isn't a lot of time so make it short and sweet. Here's a possible list of questions: What do you think of my novel proposal? Are you interested in publishing this novel? How could I change this work so that you would be interested in publishing this? Are there other publishing houses who would be interested in publishing this? Would you be ...


2

I would hesitate to ask: "What are you looking for?" because you should already know this. Publishers usually list this info on their submission guidelines or blog posts by their agents. Do some research. Find out what they are looking for, then list the ways your writing fills what they are looking for. Once you have that info, ask something like this: ...


2

FYI, I am not lawyer and I don’t know the background behind the book which I am about to show you. I just want to let you know, that something similar was already done. Take look at book Inside Steve's brain by Leander Kahney. it is mixture of Apple history and author's opinions about why Apple was so popular, with added business how-to (How to make another ...


2

(I am not a lawyer.) If you are writing an unauthorized biography of a celebrity, I imagine that falls under journalism and libel rules. So as long as you could cite every source you used, and you did not write anything which is demonstrably false, you would probably be okay. You are describing what's basically an extended case study or an academic thesis. ...


1

Capitalizing 'the' gives a strong impression of "one and only", which might bring a feeling to the reader of the advertisement that the advertising company is very confident about the product. For example, "Discover THE best meal in XYZ restaurant." is more impressive than "Discover the best meal in our XYZ restaurant. "


1

I haven't come across any specific data regarding the effect being carried over into print but I doubt it does--right now at least. Firstly, what kind of reading do people do in print? Usually it's of the attention-demanding kind--novels, textbooks--for which they've already made the mental commitment. Certain types of print material (magazines, newspapers) ...


1

I'm an author too with 4 published books. I would like to say that: 1- Get alone with yourself 2- Don't think about anything related to writing 3- Listen musics different than your playlist - in your mind included 4- Watch movies from other languages 5- Call some friends you haven't seen for a long time 6- Do something unrelated to yourself but helping for ...


1

I currently have 4 pending projects. For one book, which I wrote during the Nanowrimo, I have a first draft, almost complete, and I'm already working on the 2nd draft and hope to publish it soon. I only have outlines and notes for my other projects. So, the way I deal with my dilemma is that I work a little on all of them, however, I've chosen one ...


1

Is Y not the media contact for all purposes? If so, then you should write "AcmeCo has appointed Y as its new marketing manager. Y will also serve as AcmeCo's Media Contact. For more information, please reach out to him/her at...." If Y is not the media contact normally, then don't use that wording. "AcmeCo has appointed Y as its new marketing manager. ...


1

The length of your work is put into the description of your book automatically (page count or word count). If you do not think that's sufficient you can mention it in your explicit description you provide for your book. Besides that there may be categories for short fiction, so if you choose one of these the customer can find out what he is buying. That ...


1

I don't see many people paying even $0.99 for a single short story. There are many very good novels for $5 or less. More than people have time to read. OTOH, a collection of good short stories can be better than a novel. But maybe I'm cheap. I don't understand why anyone would pay $1 for a single song off an album. Yet lots of people do.


1

A strategy that I have had a lot of success with is to release a series of short stories and price them each at 99 cents, then also offer the collection of all the short stories at a lower price than the cost of all of them bought separately. I have had a considerable amount of success doing this with one of my pen names, and I am getting ready to use the ...


1

I understand why you have reservations about self-publishing, but the market for novellas has always been thin. If none of the outlets you find through Duotrope et al. suit your story, and you don’t want to just publish it directly, your best bet might be to build up your professional portfolio with shorter stories, and then publish an anthology that ...


1

It’s hard to give a useful answer to this question, because the vast majority of work submitted for publication is really, really awful. One editor has a “rough breakdown of manuscript characteristics, from most to least obvious rejections” here (scroll down to the numbered list). If you can write a story that is engaging to any reader who is not a close ...



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