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11

You really should not go by Dickens. There are trends and fashions in writing, and what was en vogue two hundred years ago is not necessarily the best model for commercially successful writing today. If I look at contemporary writing, the predominant viewpoint changes with the category. More "high browed", literary fiction is often written in third person ...


10

I highly suggest you do nothing. A) is a very bad idea - it will tarnish your reputation as argumentative and rude. C) could easily be construed as doing A) -- even with the best intentions, someone could take it out of context -- so it's also best to avoid that. As for if my answer would change for a different type of novel, definitely no. This is good ...


10

Technically, you own all of the content you post on Facebook; therefore, you can copyright it. HOWEVER, by posting something on Facebook you: ...grant [Facebook] a non-exclusive, transferable, sub-licensable, royalty-free, worldwide license to use any IP content that you post on... Facebook. and while this license ends when you delete the content from ...


5

Yes, you can. For example, the time I published my first book I already had a number of people willing to buy my book and who weren't related to me or weren't close friends of mine. It was a non-fiction book for a small niche and I was already known in that niche. I participated in forum discussions, used a common IRC channel, I blogged and commented on ...


4

Novellas and short stories don't sell well. Even short story collections with big names don't sell well. That is why publishing houses don't look out for novellas and short stories. But: this novella might be a good exercise and might help you grow as a writer it might be a perfect marketing instrument. As you said: a sample work. there might be another ...


4

As you suspect, an unsolicited email is not good news. America Star Books is a well-known scam. The offer shoddy, overpriced self-publishing and promotion packages. They make their money charging hopeful authors who don't know better, not by getting any of your books sold. They may well be saying something is "free" now, but if you read the email, they're ...


3

40k is a good volume for a MG novel. YA is more like 60k. There are some questions here that give more detail. If two books are equal in everything else, a publisher will buy the book with the "best length". But, as is more likely, if two books are different in everything including length, a publisher will buy the better book. So, if your book is good ...


2

Keep in mind, an agent has more functions than just to sell your book. Having sold a book to a major publisher without an agent, I can certainly attest that it is possible. However, in hindsight, I would have been better off getting one. Unless you want to become an expert in the business of books, and you have time and opportunity to hobnob with ...


2

I can't see that padding it out will make it sell better. It would put me off. A novel doesn't have to be long to sell well. Look at 'Of Mice and Men', 'A Christmas Carol', 'Animal Farm', etc.


2

The only reason to use figure titles if they already have a caption is to refer to multiple figures throughout the text, particularly if each one has multiple panels. If so, they should merely say Fig. 1 A, for example. Take a look at any scientific article for examples of this, here's one for starters. As for your example, I don't think you really need ...


2

I wanted to write what Nicole wrote, but she already did (+1), so I'm going to write something else. A productive – as in facilitating – response to a negative review is to try your best and forget for a moment that you are in love with your own work (because it is the materialization of what a beautiful and wonderful person you are), and instead take your ...


2

A novella may do better as a self-pub or a e-book than a trade paperback. Or you could write a few novellas and combine them into one larger format, like Stephen King did with Different Seasons. No way to tell until it's written and edited and you start shopping it around to agents, who will give you more market-relevant feedback.


2

Plan on a series. If I can recommend the Honor Harrington series by David Weber as an example [see wikipedia link below], he's going on 20 books now and they're still relatively good reads. David's known the end of the story for the most part since the early '90's, the rest of us are waiting for the last two novels with cash in hand, so to say. Anyway... ...


1

In my experience, a response always legitimizes a critique, so unless a) you have a policy of responding to all reviews, b) you yourself actually think the criticisms are legitimate, or c) the reviewer already has a position of legitimacy higher than yours (i.e. "Top Reviewer" status), responding is intrinsically counterproductive.


1

There are so many different strategies you could use from social media to blog hops to promotional sites, but there is no quick and simple answer as to which would work best for you. I would suggest joining a writer's forum where other writers discuss the strategies they have used and provide feedback on what has or hasn't worked. One that I use and have ...


1

I love Medium. It's a great site to read short and long essays.


1

You might find this post useful. From the link: In this article, you will gain: An understanding of how these book promotion websites work A list of the best book promotion websites, free and premium A couple of options in order to not have to do this yourself Best of luck! Promotion is exciting and challenging.


1

Try http://hubpages.com/ -- previously squidoo.com Pick the proper category and publish your article there for free and maybe generate a lot of interest. Here's a good article which will provide you with more places where you may be able to publish articles like this: ...


1

The Kindle Direct Publishing contract says that you will not make your book available elsewhere for a lower price. So if your book is available on a web site for free, you can't sell it for more than $0.00 on Amazon. If they find your book available at a lower price, they will drop the Kindle price to match it. And they will scold you. I don't know whether ...


1

A good thought for you may be what would be appropriate were I a major published writer and wanted to give away copies that the contract publisher will receive no commission from. There is a single yet albeit unconfusing answer that will be answered in a publishing contract. Yet while selling at your personal expense while giving out free copies you are a ...


1

A professional that prices books is called – big drum roll- a publisher. Since, here, it is an e-book, you are the publisher, so do some basic research. There are many sites that deal with this issue, plus forums, a simple Google search will show sites like: The shocking secret about ebook prices that will help you price your ebook; How to price your ...


1

I like what's list of ingredients. I would add two more to consider: Struggle. What keeps the character from achieving the goal? This might be antagonist or some other obstacle. What must the character do to achieve the goal? Stakes. If the character fails, so what? What are the consequences to the character, the community, the world? The key to a blurb ...


1

You need to negotiate when publishing the cases in which the rights revert to you if the book goes out of print. (I suppose today one would also have to negotiate whether a POD book is considered out of print or how long it remains POD only for it to be considered out of print.) Do you want to make digital editions of your work be free of DRM? Do you want ...


1

I'm not an expert in the subject, but I've recently done a lot of research into this myself. From what I can gather, nowadays publishers are almost entirely likely to dismiss a piece of writing (whether it's a novel or a children's book) if it is not sent to them from an agency. This is because they get thousands of submissions weekly, so it is their first ...


1

My guess is that the average reader does not know Lulu and CreateSpace from any other online store. But some people would recognize those as POD companies. And some of those would guess that you are a small publisher. And some of those would assume that your book is less professional than a traditional publisher's book. Here's the reason I don't link to my ...



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