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7

Answer them now. They have put time into your story, at your request. Do not ask them to waste their time while you decide whether you want them to publish the story that you asked them to consider. This is why most publishers forbid simultaneous submissions. If the publisher in question allows them, give them the courtesy of a prompt reply. It sounds ...


7

Agents generally do nothing for short stories. I have never heard of an agent representing a short story to a literary journal of any kind, since the 15% that they get from a sale would be too trivial of a sum to be worth their money. There are two things that an agent could potentially do for you at this stage in your career: Help you publish a short ...


7

Duotrope's Digest is just that.


7

There are a lot of pros and cons to doing this Pros: You'll be exposed to a lot of bad writing and you'll know what not to do in your own work. You'll be exposed to some good writing as well and know what you should do in your work. You'll have a chance to learn insider tricks about what to do and what not to do during submission. You have a chance to ...


6

The pros- You get a sense, really fast -- of what works and what doesn't You see all the stupid mistakes writers make when they submit and get a pretty clear idea of what not to do Reading a lot just makes you a better writer in the long run The cons- It can be laborious. It's fun to read a really great submission. It's hell to slog through a 50,000 ...


5

Writer's Market publishes a few different books, including one for poets, which include listings of publishers, agents, magazines, contests, anthologies, etc. You can find them in most major bookstores. They come out once a year, but there are also listings available on their paid-subscription website: http://www.writersmarket.com/ . It's worthwhile noting ...


4

There is always the classic, Writers Digest.


4

Some possibilities... Harper's The Atlantic The Economist


4

You might want to check out Poets & Writers. It is a bi-monthly magazine. And as it says on their home page: "If you’re looking for writing competitions, or literary magazines and small presses that welcome both new and established writers, begin here."


4

You may want to look into academic journals in your subject areas, although the authors in academic journals are often professors or graduate students. Professors at your university should be able to tell you if you can qualify, what journals are available, what would be a good fit, and how the submission process works. At many universities students are ...


3

Writers Digest is a fine magazine; another to consider is "the writer" - http://www.writermag.com/ I would also recommend magazines that include writing you consider "good" that can be inspiring; Inc. Magazine (http://www.inc.com/ ) comes to mind. You can generally get a subscription for Inc. for $10/USD per year if you shop around, and most of the ...


3

Alex, Alex, Alex, Alex, Alex. Tsk, tsk, tsk. ACCEPT!!! Dale is absolutely correct. You are looking a gift horse in the mouth. You have already committed a major faux pas by submitting your story to more than one market. You have no idea how difficult it is to publish a story in any market at any time. You have no idea how many writers' walls have been ...


3

I believe if the material warrants it, certain magazines will make an exception and agree to publish the full work. Another option might be to offer the article as a two-parter, or perhaps even suggest it as a serialized article. If you can identify natural break points yourself, then it would be easier for you to make that kind of suggestion. You don't want ...


2

Sadly, best answer is: "Depends on specific company" I will describe you, how I do it in our little group of fandom newspaper which we publish just for fun: Roles: 1) Head editor: Agrees of content of the whole new edition (new issue of the magazine), agrees on timelines (who delivers what and when), is responsible for overall look and structure of the new ...


1

If you know German: http://www.textartmagazin.de/


1

For general Interest , you can refer to below magazines : 1) Clann Magazine. 2) The Believer 3) Harper's Magazine 4) Reader's Digest 5) The Saturday Evening Post For technology content, you can refer to below magazines : 1) American Heritage of Invention & Technology 2) Invention & Technology 3) 2600: The Hacker Quarterly 4) Free Open Source ...


1

It all depends on how formal you want to be, and how likely readers are to want to check your sources. If you are writing about some controversial topic, like politics or contentious social issues, then I'd give citations so opponents can't accuse you of just making stuff up. If you were writing scholarly papers -- which you say you're not -- I'd include ...


1

I don't read slush for anyone, I read self-published stuff and other submissions to locations considered above and beyond the "writer's circle" for fun. What I get out of it is full perspective on the actually unspectacular nature of what someone might call "their killer idea". I should point out I read a lot of SF/Fantasy/Horror and thrillers. In these ...


1

If your work falls into the "genre" category, then the following sites might be useful: Duotrope: has lots of genre entries, but also general/literary markets Ralan's: predominantly SF/F/H markets, but is a great site (not the greatest looking site, but good content)



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