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9

A good parody requires a similar structure and a similar melody while altering certain words and, thus, the intention of the work. In the case of the posted verse, the syllable distribution disrupts the flow of particular sentences. Hey Verve, if you could see me now | Hey ma, if could see me now "Verve" is potentially too bulky to replace the simple ...


7

Quotes from real people and books are generally considered fair use so they can be used without paying anyone. Song lyrics and poems are a gray area. Some people will tell you you can use portions of song lyrics - a line or two - but others will say you can't use any without permission. If you're not using the whole song, you'd probably be able to get ...


6

While I am not a lawyer, if you purchase a physical CD (bit of a rarity these days, I know) and look at the booklet which has the liner notes, you should see copyright notices for each song. If lyrics have been provided, the notice will be at the end of each set of lyrics. (KISS used to copyright theirs under an entity called "Opporknockity Tunes," which ...


5

Yes. The lyrics are covered by copyright and you need permission to reproduce them. I think at least some of the "lyrics search engines" on the web pay their dues to the copyright holders (Wikipedia says: Lyrics licenses could be obtained in North America through one of the two aggregators; Gracenote Inc. and LyricFind.) Translations are also covered by ...


5

Regarding selling your lyrics, this is apparently not how the music industry works. I came across this interesting article written by an Emmy-nominated song writer, which warns against the idea of selling your lyrics: http://www.songmd.com/selling-songs-selling-lyrics.shtml Selling lyrics is never done in the legitimate music business. There are ...


4

Whether to give away or sell your work depends on your resources and the goals you have for your work. Here is how I would approach the situation were I in your place: I'd release my best work under a Creative Commons by-sa or by-sa-nc license. This helps your work gain exposure, and gives something to the community, without sacrificing ownership of your ...


4

Probably not that complicated (in theory) when you write it in a story. The problematic part is the music, rhythm, which lulls the baby. These must not be stirring, but the words are not understood by the youngest babies. Humming is enough for them. That's easy to describe. Older kids understand the lyric though. But finding something gentle should be easy ...


3

Yes, they are copyrighted. BUT, if you aren't quoting them in their entirety you don't necessarily need to obtain copyright permissions if your use is a fair one according to the rules of Fair Use. This includes uses for profit. See my answer on this question for a breakdown of how to determine if your use is fair: Can you reprint screen shots of a game ...


3

Yes you require permission from the copyright holder of the lyrics in question to reproduce them in a book. It is not treated as referenced materials. Whether you intend to profit from the book or wherever you intend to reproduce the lyrics is entirely irrelevant. The copyright holder holds the rights to those lyrics and he/she/they can stop you from ...


3

Song lyrics and poetry can be a problem. In fiction publishing, most houses will require you to get permission to quote even as little as a single line from a copyrighted popular song or from a well-known poem that's still in copyright, because many copyright owners are extremely litigious and the legal precedents on whether a single line is "fair use" are ...


2

I have the same problem! I knew a lullaby was (duh) lulling, and so I wrote down a list of all the words I could think of that had a sleepy connotation. Then I just kind of arranged them in a nonsensical but very rhythmic way. Maybe the process I used would work for you too.


2

After it's written, and you're polishing, think about vowel sounds. There should be very few words or lines which end on hard consonants (K, T) because you want the sounds and the lines to flow in a stream. Say your lines aloud in a singsong (never mind a melody) to make sure they can be sung, and you haven't picked a word which stops on a voiceless ...


2

I have three children, and just before each child's birth I wrote a lullaby that was just for that child. Each one has a different tune and a different lyrical pattern, but the one thing they have in common is that they can be sung softly in a low voice. The whole point of a lullaby is to lull the child to sleep. In most cases, the words to a lullaby ...


2

IANAL, but: If this is fiction... it's not anywhere near that easy. Song lyrics are copyrighted by their authors, and you're supposed to get permission (pay money) to use them. You can use songs that are in the public domain, but I get the feeling you want something more modern. So you'd need to track down the owners of the copyright and figure ...


2

Simple answer, you can't use someone else's copyrighted material in your own fiction without either paying them for the license or having them grant you a license for no charge. This is as true for song lyrics as it is for a poem, essay or someone else's work of fiction. It makes no difference if you attribute the work or not. Here's an article from the ...


1

According to Chicago, poetry or verse (which lyrics are), of more than two lines should be in block quotes. A blockquote is indented either left or right and can be further set off by being a smaller or different font. As to whether it should be italics, Chicago doesn't require it. That would seem to be a stylistic choice and, as long it is done ...


1

I found this at the Online Writing Lab concerning quoting poetry (emphasis added): If the quotation is three lines or longer, set it off like a block quotation (see above). Some writers prefer to set off two-line verse quotations for emphasis. Quote the poem line by line as it appears on the original page. Do not use quotation marks, and indent one inch ...


1

It ultimately depends on how much of the song you are using and the way in which it is being used. If you are using a couple of lines in a music review, then you don't need to get permission. You are most likely already mentioning the band, since it's a review of their music, and the use of a couple of lines would be recognized as fair use. Beyond that, it ...


1

Fair Use is not relevant for this, as it is fiction - it is intended to allow academic or other non-fiction to reference existing work for the purpose of comment and critique. One way around this in a fictional work would be to have the character sing along with some of the words, some of them wrongly heard, so that it is clear what the song is, but you ...



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