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7

I'm sure at this point someone will say, "You can't make broad generalizations about what ALL men or ALL women do or think or feel!" Which of course is true if taken literally. But we certainly can say that MOST men do X or MOST women think Y. We're different ... and vive la difference! Men certainly do have feelings and care about other human beings. The ...


5

We can't standardise, but we can generalise As has been mentioned, there is no standard "man" any more than there is a standard "woman". Some women are into ultimate fighting and woodwork. Some men are into cake decorating and fashion. We are all different. I'm assuming from your question though that your male protagonist is more of a standard "manly" man. ...


4

Men have emotions. The problem in your story is how he expresses them. Writing a diary to a girl sounds like something an emo guy who plays guitar to pick up girls or cuts himself would do. Girls might think it's sweet, but most guys would say 'You did what?!' In general, guys tend to be much more direct. More believable reactions (which can be combined): ...


3

More usual phrases to use in that situation are "until now," "at this point," or "at this time". Using "till" will may the reader think 'til, which is much more conversational.


3

Legally, you need permission to publish private communication. There is a lot on this on the web, you'll easily find it through Google. A response by a company to your inquiry is nevertheless addressed to you and private. You must at least anonymize it so that it is impossible to deduce which company you were writing to. If the letters have any kind of ...


2

I would not consider adding any sentence requesting a response. Instead, saying "I would look forward to the opportunity to discuss your team" or something of that nature. That, as an example, highlights that you would look forward to further conversation initiated on their end.


2

This is a good question. I remember reading a well-written novel with a particularly unsuccessful attempt at writing cross-gender. The male narrator's actions were believable, but his internal life seemed all too clearly ghostwritten by the female author, which greatly reduced my enjoyment of the book. His thoughts and preoccupations just didn't fit with ...


1

The text that you've suggested in your question is very similar to what you should write. In US business writing, it's important to get straight to the point. Other than greeting and signing off, you don't have to engage in formalities. If you come from a country, such as France, that uses traditional stock phrases in official correspondence, or cultures ...


1

I use P.S. in emails fairly often. As others points out, P.S. stands for postscript ("after signature") and it means the content was added after the message was signed. However, just because technology gives you the choice of re-wording a message to avoid a postscipt, that doesn't mean you must re-word the message to avoid a postscript. You may chose to ...


1

I think you are asking the wrong question! It isn't about whether 'men' as a gender would behave like that, it is about whether your character would behave like that. Choose any emotion that people will feel and You'll find some who exhibits that emotion at all points on that spectrum of that emotion. From someone who doesn't exhibit it at all, to ...


1

You could make your male character the kind of character who would do what you want him to. Or you could make him someone who would never do that, then somehow change his mind. I think your premise is a good one. You just need to write it in such a way that it seems natural for this character to do this thing.


1

It is an ok phrase to be used, although there are many more words that would be preferable to it, such as 'before [date of change]' or 'preceding [date]'


1

In this example, just move the word in question outside the quotation marks: It is possible for God to desire "all people to be saved." It's more difficult in the case that the word in question is buried in the quote. In that case, you would probably just put the entire word itself in brackets.


1

I don't see any problems. Till now is a very old and proper English phrase from which until derived. Shouldn't be a problem.


1

If you're recommending her, it must be that you are certain that she's a good fit. This means you need to understand where she's going to fit, and why. Using buzzwords and superlatives is too easy. It only makes a promise. Why would they believe a person who has a thesaurus? What specific experiences that you had with her make you so confident that you're ...


1

In business communication, as in most other communication, you want to be as concise as possible while still being effective. Your sentence "The reason for which I am writing..." with or without the "to you" is unnecessarily convoluted. Try "I am writing to express my interest..." or even "I am interested in..." Get to the point. I read a lot of cover ...



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