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41

When following up on an e-mail: I usually forward the original e-mail to the original recipient, with some added text at the top. Hello [Name], Have you had time to look into this? Kind Regards, ... Forwarded message: From: .... Date: ... Subject: ... To: ... ...


18

I'd probably go with something on the lines of: Hi [whoever] Just checking that the XXX I sent you on Xth XXX is okay. I have to [do something] with your feedback before I can [do something else]. Can you let me know when you'll be able to look at it for me? Thanks That way, it makes it sound like you're putting yourself in their debt ...


14

Cover letters are tricky, because if you're writing a CL for a traditional job you're probably competing with somewhere between 50 and 300 other applicants. This means HR has to find a fast way of filtering the wheat from the chaff. Your resume is generally the first thing an HR person looks at. If you make it past the first screening, your cover letter may ...


8

I usually use it purposely to add something related to the email, but that I don't want to mix with the rest, likely to let the reader to focus more easily on the part of the email I think it's more important; I like to use it like a sort of "side note", placed after the written text (lit. latin "post scriptum" can be translated as "after the written ...


7

Dear [Name of Editor], my name is [Your Name], I'm [your age] old and work as [your job] in [your town]. I have [never published anything before / published the following stories and novels:] Title of Short Story, Anthology, Year, Number Title of Novel, Year, Publisher Enclosed you will find [the first draft / treatment and first 50 pages / whatever] of ...


7

I'm sure at this point someone will say, "You can't make broad generalizations about what ALL men or ALL women do or think or feel!" Which of course is true if taken literally. But we certainly can say that MOST men do X or MOST women think Y. We're different ... and vive la difference! Men certainly do have feelings and care about other human beings. The ...


6

A postscript is a passage at the end of a letter, following the signature. It only makes sense in the context of a letter composed by hand or on a typewriter, to accommodate an afterthought when you have already finished your letter, and don't want to retype or rewrite the whole thing again. It makes no sense in an email context - or even a paper letter ...


6

I like suggesting that they may have already done it, in case they have! Dear xxx, If you haven't already, please take a moment to ... If you have, thank you. Regards, xxx


6

There are actually quite a few options, many of which come naturally when you're not forced to consciously write formally. You can change the verb into an –ing: "Having done freelance for 8 years, I..." "Choosing to work from home has..." or in some cases turn the verb into the subject or your sentence. "Experience with Java has helped..." ...


6

Good morning XXX, I wanted to touch base with you about the status of your article for the newsletter. Please advise whether you will be able to send it to me by the end of the week. If it doesn't work with your schedule, that's fine; I just need to know one way or the other for planning purposes. Thanks! Regards, [your name]


6

You could use empty brackets with a space between them. Brackets are generally used to alter a quote inline, such as fixing grammar or to add information like a name so the quoted material will work within the context of the piece quoting it. "desire[ ] all people to be saved" or don't quote that word: It is possible for God to want "all people to ...


6

Do a search for "which was." (or whatever your problem structure is) Set up a checklist of five different ways to rewrite it: 1) We did such-and-such. I enjoyed it. 2) When we did such-and-such, everyone had a great time. 3) Plus we really had fun that time we did such-and-such. 4) Have you ever done such-and-such? What a blast. 5) Such-and-such is so much ...


5

The postscript is indeed of limited use, but it might still be useful when one has something else to say, but doesn't want to compose the email all over again. People still do compose letters from time to time, and send them on paper. I do it maybe once a year, and I can see it coming up where I have something to add, but don't want to print the letter ...


5

Write it as if you're the one apologizing to them. You know that they're the one who is dragging their feet. Pretend like you were instead. Frame the message in terms of "I must have missed an email somewhere, sorry" rather than "why haven't you sent me an email?" This lets them take the action you want without accepting blame for the delay, which for ...


5

We can't standardise, but we can generalise As has been mentioned, there is no standard "man" any more than there is a standard "woman". Some women are into ultimate fighting and woodwork. Some men are into cake decorating and fashion. We are all different. I'm assuming from your question though that your male protagonist is more of a standard "manly" man. ...


4

Here's how I write it: Hi - this is just a friendly reminder that I'm waiting for [whatever it is]. Thanks!


4

I think you're in a bit of a bind here. I think you'll have an easy time getting "does this work for you?" feedback, which is crucial. However, I think you'll find it very difficult to find constructive, "here is how you can make your letter awesome" feedback. Let me explain. You're trying to be attention-grabbing and evocative. Notice that this is ...


4

My personal opinion? Don't write. They'll never be able to tell you're not some hack just from the letter, and they will not bother to check by replying. Meet them in person at some book-signing or a conference or wherever they meet the public. Talk face to face. Answer their questions. Build a personal relationship. And primarily, value the person for who ...


4

Men have emotions. The problem in your story is how he expresses them. Writing a diary to a girl sounds like something an emo guy who plays guitar to pick up girls or cuts himself would do. Girls might think it's sweet, but most guys would say 'You did what?!' In general, guys tend to be much more direct. More believable reactions (which can be combined): ...


3

I think post by sotondolphin (based on info in the included link) is pretty good, but I have the following disagreements / additions: Make it mistake-free. [Many hirers' attitude is, "If they can't avoid mistakes in a cover letter, then it's guaranteed their work will be even sloppier after I hire them."] I disagree about the technical terms. Often, ...


3

A cover Letter has a fixed structure: The first paragraph describes which position you are applying for and where you found the position. The second paragraph explains why you think you are suitable for this position. The third paragraph is set for follow-up actions you are expecting or you may take (such as hearing from you or "I will call you to ...


3

I don't have much hands-on experience with recommendations. Here's my thoughts from a writing perspective. The role of a great recommendation is to explain what makes a particular person stand out. That means you need to be able to describe, at least to yourself, what makes this one person special. One way to do that is to heap on superlatives, just ...


3

First, you need to understand the type of organization (in this case the educational institution and program) and what THEY are looking for. In that way you will have a better idea as to what you need to "market." Also an understanding of how they "view" a letter like this. (Unfortunately, some are using software with key word searches and or "hirelings" ...


3

Legally, you need permission to publish private communication. There is a lot on this on the web, you'll easily find it through Google. A response by a company to your inquiry is nevertheless addressed to you and private. You must at least anonymize it so that it is impossible to deduce which company you were writing to. If the letters have any kind of ...


3

More usual phrases to use in that situation are "until now," "at this point," or "at this time". Using "till" will may the reader think 'til, which is much more conversational.


3

Personally, I think adding too many details harms your case --it makes you sound like someone who habitually searches for excuses rather than someone who experienced a valid, one-time emergency. Therefore, I would initially go with the simplest reasoning: This is XXXX from your Tue/Thu mornings Speech class. I came down with the flu last week and was ...


2

I hope this email finds you well. I'm just emailing to check how far the (xxprogram/process/proceduresxx) goes. I’ll be waiting your (xxrecommendations/reply/answerxx) regarding (xxthis matter/the __ programxx). If you require any further (xxInfo/detailsxx) about (xxxx) , I remain at your disposal. Have a nice day Sir. Thank you. Kind regards,


2

I usually write something like: Hi. I was checking my mail and it looks like I didn't get a response to the mail I wrote you, am I wrong? I've found that the longer the mail, the lowest the probability that the guy actually replies back to me, so I keep emails short and polite.


2

Well, makes sure you're clear what you're asking about and don't assume they have the same information that you do. If you're following up on a submission make sure you tell them the title of the story and when you sent it off. It's possible that lost/misplaced your submission so this information well help them find your work. Just remember to give them ...


2

I'd call it "Reference" or "Subject."



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