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28

When following up on an e-mail: I usually forward the original e-mail to the original recipient, with some added text at the top. Hello [Name], Have you had time to look into this? Kind Regards, ... Forwarded message: From: .... Date: ... Subject: ... To: ... ...


15

I'd probably go with something on the lines of: Hi [whoever] Just checking that the XXX I sent you on Xth XXX is okay. I have to [do something] with your feedback before I can [do something else]. Can you let me know when you'll be able to look at it for me? Thanks That way, it makes it sound like you're putting yourself in their debt ...


14

Cover letters are tricky, because if you're writing a CL for a traditional job you're probably competing with somewhere between 50 and 300 other applicants. This means HR has to find a fast way of filtering the wheat from the chaff. Your resume is generally the first thing an HR person looks at. If you make it past the first screening, your cover letter may ...


8

You do need a dot after "Ms". Also (in US anyway) we say "I took an exam" not "I wrote an exam", but not sure if that's a UK vs. US thing. You say "On January 12th" or "On the 12th of January", not "On 12th January". It comes off as a bit impolite/impersonal though.. a bit stilted. This might be smoother: Dear Ms. XXX, I took the XXX exam on ...


6

I usually use it purposely to add something related to the email, but that I don't want to mix with the rest, likely to let the reader to focus more easily on the part of the email I think it's more important; I like to use it like a sort of "side note", placed after the written text (lit. latin "post scriptum" can be translated as "after the written ...


6

There are actually quite a few options, many of which come naturally when you're not forced to consciously write formally. You can change the verb into an –ing: "Having done freelance for 8 years, I..." "Choosing to work from home has..." or in some cases turn the verb into the subject or your sentence. "Experience with Java has helped..." ...


5

Good morning XXX, I wanted to touch base with you about the status of your article for the newsletter. Please advise whether you will be able to send it to me by the end of the week. If it doesn't work with your schedule, that's fine; I just need to know one way or the other for planning purposes. Thanks! Regards, [your name]


5

I like suggesting that they may have already done it, in case they have! Dear xxx, If you haven't already, please take a moment to ... If you have, thank you. Regards, xxx


4

Here's how I write it: Hi - this is just a friendly reminder that I'm waiting for [whatever it is]. Thanks!


4

The postscript is indeed of limited use, but it might still be useful when one has something else to say, but doesn't want to compose the email all over again. People still do compose letters from time to time, and send them on paper. I do it maybe once a year, and I can see it coming up where I have something to add, but don't want to print the letter ...


4

I think you're in a bit of a bind here. I think you'll have an easy time getting "does this work for you?" feedback, which is crucial. However, I think you'll find it very difficult to find constructive, "here is how you can make your letter awesome" feedback. Let me explain. You're trying to be attention-grabbing and evocative. Notice that this is ...


4

Dear [Name of Editor], my name is [Your Name], I'm [your age] old and work as [your job] in [your town]. I have [never published anything before / published the following stories and novels:] Title of Short Story, Anthology, Year, Number Title of Novel, Year, Publisher Enclosed you will find [the first draft / treatment and first 50 pages / whatever] of ...


4

My personal opinion? Don't write. They'll never be able to tell you're not some hack just from the letter, and they will not bother to check by replying. Meet them in person at some book-signing or a conference or wherever they meet the public. Talk face to face. Answer their questions. Build a personal relationship. And primarily, value the person for who ...


4

A postscript is a passage at the end of a letter, following the signature. It only makes sense in the context of a letter composed by hand or on a typewriter, to accommodate an afterthought when you have already finished your letter, and don't want to retype or rewrite the whole thing again. It makes no sense in an email context - or even a paper letter ...


3

I think post by sotondolphin (based on info in the included link) is pretty good, but I have the following disagreements / additions: Make it mistake-free. [Many hirers' attitude is, "If they can't avoid mistakes in a cover letter, then it's guaranteed their work will be even sloppier after I hire them."] I disagree about the technical terms. Often, ...


3

A cover Letter has a fixed structure: The first paragraph describes which position you are applying for and where you found the position. The second paragraph explains why you think you are suitable for this position. The third paragraph is set for follow-up actions you are expecting or you may take (such as hearing from you or "I will call you to ...


3

I don't have much hands-on experience with recommendations. Here's my thoughts from a writing perspective. The role of a great recommendation is to explain what makes a particular person stand out. That means you need to be able to describe, at least to yourself, what makes this one person special. One way to do that is to heap on superlatives, just ...


3

First, you need to understand the type of organization (in this case the educational institution and program) and what THEY are looking for. In that way you will have a better idea as to what you need to "market." Also an understanding of how they "view" a letter like this. (Unfortunately, some are using software with key word searches and or "hirelings" ...


3

Write it as if you're the one apologizing to them. You know that they're the one who is dragging their feet. Pretend like you were instead. Frame the message in terms of "I must have missed an email somewhere, sorry" rather than "why haven't you sent me an email?" This lets them take the action you want without accepting blame for the delay, which for ...


2

I hope this email finds you well. I'm just emailing to check how far the (xxprogram/process/proceduresxx) goes. I’ll be waiting your (xxrecommendations/reply/answerxx) regarding (xxthis matter/the __ programxx). If you require any further (xxInfo/detailsxx) about (xxxx) , I remain at your disposal. Have a nice day Sir. Thank you. Kind regards,


2

I usually write something like: Hi. I was checking my mail and it looks like I didn't get a response to the mail I wrote you, am I wrong? I've found that the longer the mail, the lowest the probability that the guy actually replies back to me, so I keep emails short and polite.


2

Well, makes sure you're clear what you're asking about and don't assume they have the same information that you do. If you're following up on a submission make sure you tell them the title of the story and when you sent it off. It's possible that lost/misplaced your submission so this information well help them find your work. Just remember to give them ...


2

I'd call it "Reference" or "Subject."


2

It's a bit gushing but I guess that's your style. It looks good -- you don't really need help with writing. Except Capitalize "Compliance" if it's a department name. Replace "talented people like yourself," with "talented people," -- they know you're addressing them. Replace "I only hope that I find in my new role a fraction of the encouragement" with "I ...


2

1. In what format can I write a cover letter? Read the job posting carefully and see if they have any requirements, number one priority is to follow all instructions exactly. In general you want to start by stating the position you're applying for. After that you can use any format you'd like if you believe it will be professional and beneficial. There ...


2

There are many good and great writers in the world to learn from. You need not track down Faulkner. It is most likely a quest that will result in much wasted time and little gain. Many very great writers are easily accessible in their posts as college professors, where they have offices on campus you can find without any special effort, and get a chance to ...


2

First of all, don't let yourself be intimidated by this effort. You need to be yourself and remain respectful, and you will be fine. I would recommend opening your letter with a standard salutation: "Dear Sir", or simply "Professor Xxxxx". Next, introduce yourself and briefly explain your reason for writing. Follow up with a brief summary of your work ...


1

Instead of saying, "I have experience with X," consider describing what you did with X. "I created a global meteor defense system using Java and Arduino."


1

Make sure you have a job specification on hand and relate relevant experience for the new job. General platitudes are best avoided. Re-read the letter thinking "What justification do I have to rejecting this candidate based on this letter?". If you cannot come with anything, you probably did a good job. As a side note, if this is a professional ...


1

About.com refers to this as the Reference Line:- http://jobsearchtech.about.com/od/letters/l/bl_mblock_p.htm



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