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The best way to prevent anyone from stealing your idea, is to have a rubbish idea, and write it badly. Anything more than that and what you write will become part of the canon and people will build from it. You're protected from someone stealing the details of your story, but that isn't generally how work is copied. I remember when I first saw Iron ...


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As others have noted, no, you do not have to create a business of any sort in order to write and publish. Copyrights are usually registered in the name of an individual, not a company. Look at the copyright notice in the books on your shelf. Almost all will be a person's name, not a business. As a self-published author, the easiest way to get your books ...


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Once you write something, you officially own the copyright to it. That basically means that nobody else can use your story, characters, or setting to create their own story, because it would be considered a derivative work. Basic copyright laws protect the owner from such acts. To help ensure that other people do not assume that your work is "open source", ...


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You own the copyright on your book. It's a good idea to include a copyright notice when you publish. In the copyright notice, you can claim the copyright in your own name. You do not need to invent a company or alias. You do not need to register the copyright (though that may be a good idea). Publishing is more complex than you might imagine if you want to ...


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You are correct in your assumption that you do not need to have any type of company designation regarding a publisher, whether it be as a sole proprietorship or "doing business as". You simply operate as an individual publishing his own works, end of story. Some writers do choose to pursue some form of incorporation, but most don't need to bother with it. ...


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You'll need to check with the tax laws of the jurisdiction you're living in to be sure, but in general, you don't need to have any extra legal designations in order to publish, but you DO need to declare the income for tax purposes. Amazon sends out 1099-MISC forms to their author/publishers detailing the money earned in each tax year.One copy of that form ...


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Copyright is free. Assuming you're living in a country that's a signatory to the Berne Convention, which you almost certainly are, your work is copyrighted as soon as you record your ideas. Registering copyright may cost something, depending on where you live, but it's of dubious value, really. In the US, for example, registering copyright allows you to sue ...


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Unauthorized use of copyrighted material is (in the United States) a violation of federal law. Don't do it. Get a lawyer. Get permission.



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