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I would only think that the trademark rule would apply if the character's name was imperative to the plot of the story. For example, if someone were to write a novel about the comic book character "The Flash."


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I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. First, check any license terms that accompany Company S's documentation. They might have published it with the intention that other vendors will incorporate it (e.g. some Apache platforms), or they might not intend that but allow it under their license (e.g. Stack Exchange, or anything else that uses the ...


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This is a legal issue. Specifically, a copyright issue. Assuming we are talking about the United States, company S owns the copyright to their documentation. It is illegal for company M or anyone else to incorporate company S's documentation into their own without obtaining the right to do so from company S. Consult an attorney. Also, take a look at The ...


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If this is classified information and you only know about it because you have a high-level security clearance, than publishing the information in any form could put you in danger of criminal charges. But assuming that this is publicly available information, so that there's no issue of espionage or treason charges, and you're just thinking about copyright or ...


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In both of the examples you gave, I would assume that there is some level of public knowledge or information that has already been shared publicly. As a result, there would be no reason for you to not be able to write about it. One way to help you answer your own question is to ask yourself how you came to know about it. If you read about it online or ...


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In response to Question 2: Likelihood implies a question of probability; rather than probability, you may wish to consider the possibility of legal ramifications. One possible legal ramification is your written statements being entered into evidence under one of the exceptions to the Rule Against Hearsay (Admission by Party Opponent, or Prior ...


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I could be wrong, but I wonder what you could possibly know, unless you worked for them, that a government, etc. would get upset about you publishing. If it is public knowledge it is exactly that. Anthony Horowitz published a book where everyone given a particular injection would be killed when a radio transmitter was turned on activating the ingredients of ...


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If the item is a legitimate experiment from the military and it's not public knowledge (e.g. you have security clearances with access to that info), I would most definitely ask a lawyer, but my gut says no. If it is public knowledge, then pretty much anything is fair game, especially if you're writing fiction. Though to ease your mind, you may still want to ...


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As well as being a writer, I am a graphic designer and sign maker. I photograph the signs I make and include those photos and also images of logos I have designed, in my advertising materials: Web site, pamphlets, catalogue, and signs. In that regard, if I have read your question properly, I am doing much the same as you. Unless you have assigned the ...


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I am not a lawyer, so this is from a writer's, not legal point of view. As it were, anyone can sue anybody for anything at any time. So the issue is, how have people minimized the possibility of this happening (and worse, losing) One form of "protection" that has been used by some authors and publishers is to slightly "misspell" the place in question. For ...


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Let's take a step back. What is your goal in writing this story? If you think that some real person did something that would make an interesting story, and you don't have any desire to praise or condemn the real person, than just change details of the events and the person sufficiently that there is no obvious similarity. Like I said in response to another ...


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After consulting the Meta question about answering legal questions, I've decided to post what I've found regarding libel in fiction. I am not a lawyer. I am summarizing from this blog post supposedly written by a lawyer, but the disclaimer at the end is maybe the most important thing to note: Libel law is fact specific. Further, [there] is no single ...



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