Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

The best method of going about this would be to first contact Ed Greenwood, as he is the one who created the Forgotten Realms in the first place. I would ask him if you need to talk with him or Wizards of the Coast (WotC) to write in the Forgotten Realms. If Ed Greenwood, then find out from him what you have to do to get permission. If WotC, then read ...


0

For what you're deciding to write, you could create an outline and ask a lawyer to consider the possible ramifications if the authorities decided to act upon it. However, you'd probably be better off introducing a secondary character that performed the various actions that you're concerned about. In Farley Mowat's And No Birds Sang, his autobiographical ...


1

I am not a lawyer. But ... I don't know how police and courts treat an autobiography. I've never heard of someone being convicted of a crime because he confessed to it in an autobiography. But a very common method for police to catch a criminal is that he tells someone else about the crime and that person reports it to the police. Many criminals seem to get ...


0

You should be safe on legal footing, assuming that the copyrights were not assigned to your clients or that you don't have contractual obligations to request permission from the clients to use these works.


1

Disclaimer: This is the opinion of someone with no legal expertise. If a central part why you expect people to seek out your book is the enjoyment of the history and setting of a well-known universe, then you actually ARE seeking to profit off someone else's creative work and marketing, and you shouldn't do it unless they give you permission. If the ...


0

I would only think that the trademark rule would apply if the character's name was imperative to the plot of the story. For example, if someone were to write a novel about the comic book character "The Flash."


4

I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. First, check any license terms that accompany Company S's documentation. They might have published it with the intention that other vendors will incorporate it (e.g. some Apache platforms), or they might not intend that but allow it under their license (e.g. Stack Exchange, or anything else that uses the ...


1

This is a legal issue. Specifically, a copyright issue. Assuming we are talking about the United States, company S owns the copyright to their documentation. It is illegal for company M or anyone else to incorporate company S's documentation into their own without obtaining the right to do so from company S. Consult an attorney. Also, take a look at The ...


0

If this is classified information and you only know about it because you have a high-level security clearance, than publishing the information in any form could put you in danger of criminal charges. But assuming that this is publicly available information, so that there's no issue of espionage or treason charges, and you're just thinking about copyright or ...


1

In both of the examples you gave, I would assume that there is some level of public knowledge or information that has already been shared publicly. As a result, there would be no reason for you to not be able to write about it. One way to help you answer your own question is to ask yourself how you came to know about it. If you read about it online or ...


1

In response to Question 2: Likelihood implies a question of probability; rather than probability, you may wish to consider the possibility of legal ramifications. One possible legal ramification is your written statements being entered into evidence under one of the exceptions to the Rule Against Hearsay (Admission by Party Opponent, or Prior ...



Top 50 recent answers are included