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-1

It will depend on the terms of your contract. Try consulting a contract lawyer and look it over.


1

I'm no legal expert, so this is just my best guess: In the case of a true story with a fictionalized character, the use of a fake name when everyone else is under their real name is enough to signal the distance between the real and fake person. In a story where everyone is under a fake name, however, the use of distinctive distinguishing traits might be ...


0

In the "Red Hat Club," it seems to me that the author was drawing on a SINGLE woman for the inspiration of her main character, rather than a generic "type." One of the tests I use is, are there 100, or better yet, 1000 people who could be the inspiration for the fictitious character? Or is she described so exactly that there could only be one person (or a ...


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I am not a lawyer. But according to copyright.gov, in the US, once you create a work, you have copyright protection. But you can register your copyright for added protection. When is my work protected? Your work is under copyright protection the moment it is created and fixed in a tangible form that it is perceptible either directly or with the aid ...


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There are traditionally three active defenses against charges of libel, slander or defamation. Yes, it is mean and nasty but it is true. (I called her a ^bad-word^ and she is, see here is the proof.) The standards of evidence is lower in this case, it only needs to be compelling not preponderance there of. Well it is not true, but it is nice. (As far as I ...


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Neither of those things will really do anything to provide you with any protection in a court of law. As far as a "low-budget" copyright method, the only thing you need to do is add the following line to the bottom of your manuscript: Copyright 2015, Author Name It's just as simple as that. Make sure that you have a copy for yourself before you send it ...


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I'm not a lawyer, so the views expressed here are those of a layman, and writer. Your situation appears to resemble the one in "The Red Hat Club" litigation, which the plaintiff won. This does not appear to be a situation where the author created a "generic" character that somewhat resembles you: female, college-educated, from a certain geography, etc. It ...


3

Ultimately it comes down to the type of story that you are writing and how you go about writing it. For example, if you are writing a book based on a historical event, you can usually get by with just classifying it as a historical novel or historical fiction based on real events. Most readers will immediately recognize what this means and will not hold you ...


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IANAL. Courts have ruled that you can say a lot of things about "public figures" and they will not have grounds to sue. That said, if a person with a lot of money found what you said about him offensive, he could still sue you. He might not win, but you would have to hire a lawyer to defend yourself, take time off work to go to court, etc. As others have ...


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I'm not a lawyer and my answer is based on the writing workshops I attended years ago. At workshop, I was told that celebrities in your story ought to be "minor characters" so that the reader doesn't lose focus on your main characters. For instance, you might your main character see a (celebrity) Jane Doe concert with their boyfriend/girlfriend, and then ...



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