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4

I'd send the person an email apologizing for accidentally sending them the document and requesting them to ignore it and throw it away. The probability that a random stranger is going to be interested in stealing your work is pretty close to zero. Unless he's a writer himself, odds are he doesn't have the faintest idea how to go about publishing it. He ...


0

Okay, using William Shakespeare as an example is bad. First off, he has been for centuries and this makes it harder to gauge his authenticity as a writer. Who could say William Shakespeare retold "Romeo and Juliet" ? Do you see how bad your example is without an historical account or anecdote? Use something more contemporary cases like Mother of the ...


3

We don't. It's a blurred line and a fortune in legal costs on arguing where it lies. Of course there is a classification, but the lines are always blurred. On the "white side" there's alluding - when you make your own characters, but draw specific parallels, exploring what-if's of the other work, mocking its shortcomings, or referencing its most brilliant ...


0

Legally, there have probably been millions of words written on the ramifications of this question for the law of every nation that has laws on the subject at all. Historically, Shakespeare didn't just get away with it because he was brilliant but because the laws and customs of Elizabethan England did not have any more than an embryonic concept of ...


1

There is a case pending that may answer this in court: Paramount v Axanar. See http://conlang.org/axanar for more info, including formal legal briefing and a memorandum from Dentons on conlangs & IP law. (Disclosure: I direct the Language Creation Society's lawyer on this.) You could also just commission a conlanger to make a language for you, so you ...



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